1
vote
2answers
78 views

State of constant motion

Why does an object remains in its state of constant motion if there are no forces acting on that object? My understanding is that all the energy of the motion will be kept inside and a change in the ...
0
votes
0answers
35 views

Including special relativistic effects in momentum in Heisenberg's Uncertainty Principle

I've been told that an electron is somewhere within the space of $10^{-10}m$ and am supposed to find the uncertainty in its velocity. Simply applying $m\Delta x \Delta v \geq \frac{h}{4\pi}$ results ...
4
votes
2answers
128 views

Unitary representations of the diffeomorphism group in curved spacetime

In (special) relativistic quantum mechanics there is a standard argument that says that the (rigged) Hilbert space of states $H$ should be equipped with a projective unitary representation $U$ of the ...
4
votes
1answer
99 views

The choice of measurement basis on one half of an entangled state affects the other half. Can this be used to communicate faster than light?

It is often stated, particularly in popular physics articles and videos, that if one measures a particle A that is entangled with some other particle B, then this measurement will immediately affect ...
5
votes
1answer
128 views

Is basic quantum mechanics mathematically as robust a theory as special relativity?

This question is specifically about the robustness of mathematical models. Special relativity can be derived from very basic principles. Assuming that space is homogeneous and isotropic and that ...
1
vote
1answer
81 views

Understanding the operation of Thomas precession

How can we physically understand the operation of Thomas Precession? This modifies the effective energy of coupling between the spin and the orbital angular momentum of the electron by an extra factor ...
0
votes
0answers
50 views

When do wave function collapse in this case?

In relativity, an event A can occur before another event B in one frame while A may occur after event B in another. In quantum mechanics, we may measure the spin of two entangled electrons: If you ...
2
votes
1answer
130 views

Has QFT successfully mediated between QM and Special Relativity?

I understand that QFT is the theoretical framework for combining QM and Special Relativity, but as I understand it, though even without proof or experimental confirmations; has QFT managed to "behind ...
2
votes
1answer
55 views

Theoretical Upper Bound on Processor Speed?

Barring aside considerations such as heat dissipation, capacitance, etc... (aka any sort of technological issue) what is the fastest speed of a processor? I am told that at distances of 1 planck ...
0
votes
1answer
109 views

Photons and proper time

Why is there no proper time without inertial frame? In question n°95054 I learned that there is no proper time zero and no proper distance zero for photons because they are no inertial frames. That ...
3
votes
2answers
145 views

Why is $U(\Lambda)^{-1} = U(\Lambda^{-1})$ for a unitary representation?

This is from the beginning of Srednicki's QFT textbook, where he writes (approximately): In QM we associate a unitary operator $U(\Lambda)$ to each proper orthochronous Lorentz transformation ...
-2
votes
1answer
163 views

Resolution of the EPR paradox using relativity of simultaneity

A simple explanation for photon entanglement experiments Example: Quantum teleportation La Palma-Teneriffa in 2012 (distance 143 km) - Photons were entangled in such a way that when measuring ...
-3
votes
1answer
76 views

Resolution of the EPR paradox using special relativity

Please refer to the question "Resolution of the EPR paradox using relativity of simultaneity" I hope that this question will be clearer. EPR photon experiments are a paradox for scientists. Can ...
2
votes
0answers
91 views

Spacetime and uncertainty principle

I only have limited knowledge of relativity and quantumphysics but as far as I know, the uncertainty principle relates the uncertainty of space and momentum of a particle. Einstein however, explained ...
3
votes
1answer
66 views

Did the Goudsmit-Uhlenbeck analysis of spin consider relativity?

It's frequently mentioned in introductory quantum mechanics texts that Goudsmit and Uhlenbeck conjectured that the magnetic moment of an electron was due to angular momentum arising from the electron ...
1
vote
0answers
85 views

Quantum Eraser under Lorentz Boost

Suppose I am conducting the Quantum Eraser experiment. The results of this experiment are easy to understand with the traditional quantum mechanical interpretation of a pair of entangled photons. ...
1
vote
1answer
155 views

Properties of Lorentz transformation generator?

In chapter 2 of Srednicki, the author defines: $$ U(1+\delta \omega) = I +\frac{i}{2h}\delta \omega_{\mu \nu} M^{\mu \nu} $$ where the $M^{\mu\nu}$s are hermitian operators and are the generators of ...
0
votes
1answer
144 views

Classically, how can an electron orbiting a proton radiate given its relativistic energy

In classical relativistic Electrodynamics, we are often told that any accelerating point charge inherently radiates (Bremstrallung). (This is the basis for the need for a QM conception of electrons.) ...
1
vote
1answer
145 views

About Pauli-Lubanski 4-vector

I saw you answered someone else about the Pauli-Lubanski 4-vector properties. I was doing some simple analysis of polarized leptons, started with the canonical convention of the spin operator wich is ...
5
votes
3answers
274 views

Uncertainty principle and the energy-momentum 4-vector

In each of the uncertainty relations $$\Delta p_x \Delta x \geq \hbar/2$$ $$\Delta p_y \Delta y \geq \hbar/2$$$$\Delta p_z \Delta z \geq \hbar/2$$$$\Delta E \Delta t \geq \hbar/2$$ the second term on ...
1
vote
1answer
99 views

Four vector manipulation

I have started doing Relativistic Quantum Mechanics from Greiner. I'm having difficulty understanding the following derivation for commutation relations (page 4): $$[\hat{p}^\mu, x^\nu] = ...
1
vote
2answers
164 views

Energy transfer using quantum entanglement

Can we transfer energy from one place to another separated by arbitrarily large distances without any time lag? For instance, if Alice and Bob are two observers making measurements having a singlet ...
0
votes
0answers
117 views

Quantum Entanglement and Causality [duplicate]

How does Quantum Entanglement not violate the principle of relativity? Alice and Bob are working on an entangled system of electrons which is spaced long apart. Now if Alice measures one electron to ...
5
votes
2answers
318 views

How does QFT help with entanglement?

I'm a bit confused. QFT is claimed to incorporate both Quantum Mechanics and Special Relativity. Therefore it should address the problem of non-locality caused by entanglement. However when I search ...
0
votes
1answer
94 views

Space and Time Equality and information transfer between particles existing at different time

Since space and time are the same is it that whatever happens at different positions in space should take place at different time? If what I think is correct consider an electric dipole, the charges ...
0
votes
1answer
166 views

Special relativity and quantum mechanics

I know how the Dirac's equation about the relativistic quantum mechanics works. Can anyone tell me how can one combine special relativity and quantum mechanics as a whole - special relativity is valid ...
13
votes
2answers
355 views

Why does nonlinearity in quantum mechanics lead to superluminal signaling?

I recently came across two nice papers on the foundations of quantum mechancis, Aaronson 2004 and Hardy 2001. Aaronson makes the statement, which was new to me, that nonlinearity in QM leads to ...
0
votes
1answer
100 views

Moving electron - finding the wavefunction

On our modern physics class my professor did a problem: Write down a wavefunction of an electron which is moving from left to right and has an energy $100\text{ eV}$. At first i said: "Oh i know ...
5
votes
2answers
378 views

The problem of a relativistic path integral

Many books have described the path integral for non-relativistic quantum. For example, how to get the Schrödinger equation from the path integral. But no one told us the relativistic version. In fact, ...
3
votes
1answer
144 views

How can “quantum particles have positive masses, even though the classical waves travel at the speed of light”?

Clay Mathematics Institute writes about the Yang-Mills and mass gap problem on this page http://www.claymath.org/millennium/Yang-Mills_Theory/: The successful use of Yang-Mills theory to describe ...
2
votes
1answer
112 views

Anti-symmetric 2 particle wave function

Suppose we want to construct a wave function for 2 free (relativistic) fermions. As we are dealing with fermions the total wave function has to be antisymmetric under interchange of the coordinates, ...
0
votes
0answers
94 views

How does special relativity affect this photon/mirror experiment?

Here is a simple experiment showing how amplitudes add and cancel in a simple photon-mirror experiment. In the comments, someone pointed out What confuses me about the actual verification of ...
1
vote
3answers
138 views

Measurements and simultaneity [duplicate]

Picture a situation where we have two observers, $A$ and $B$, and a system in a certain quantum state. If $B$ makes a measurement of some observable, say energy for example, the state will collapse to ...
4
votes
1answer
136 views

Quantum Mechanical Effects of an object accelerating near speed of light $c$?

Consider a space ship, undergoing constant acceleration (which for our purposes means that the same amount of energy is being used per second to increase its speed). According to special relativity ...
6
votes
4answers
419 views

Why is the Dirac equation not used for calculations?

From what I understand the Dirac equation is supposed to be an improvement on the Schrödinger equation in that it is consistent with relativity theory. Yet all methods I have encountered for doing ...
4
votes
3answers
178 views

Reaching the speed of light via quantum mechanical uncertainty?

Suppose you accelerate a body to very near the speed of light $c$ where $v = c - \epsilon$. Although this would take an enormous energy, is it possible the last arbitrarily small velocity needed -- ...
3
votes
1answer
139 views

Difference between vector and pseudo-scalar

In physics, a pseudo-scalar is a quantity that behaves like a scalar, except that it changes sign under a parity inversion such as improper rotations while a true scalar does not. Can someone show me ...
5
votes
4answers
865 views

Does entanglement not immediately contradict the theory of special relativity?

Does entanglement not immediately contradict the theory of special relativity? Why are people still so convinced nothing can travel faster than light when we are perfectly aware of something that ...
1
vote
1answer
130 views

The Klein–Gordon equation

As we know that the Schrödinger equation presents basis of Quantum Mechanics and analogy with Newton second law in Classical Mechanics, I thought that relativistic interpretation of Schrödinger ...
0
votes
2answers
157 views

If inherent randomness exist in quantum mechanics, what then of eternalism implied by relativity?

I am nothing but a curious layman so don't go too technical on me. First of all, I am well aware that a lot of people consider the question of determinism vs indeterminism to be unsolved and others ...
6
votes
2answers
436 views

Meaning of spin

I'm pretty astounded that I did not hear about this sooner, but in my course on QFT our professor told us that the concept of spin can be used to mean three things: Mechanical spin (apparently a ...
1
vote
1answer
111 views

The status / acceptance of block time?

What is the current status or acceptance of block time as it relates to Einstein's theory of relativity? Has quantum mechanics ruled it out or is it still the favored view of the world? Perhaps there ...
6
votes
2answers
573 views

Does quantum mechanics allow faster than light (FTL) travel?

Let's suppose I initially have a particle with a nice and narrow wave function[1] (I will leave these unnormed): $$e^{-\frac{x^2}{a}}$$ where $a$ is some small number (to make it narrow). Let's also ...
6
votes
1answer
372 views

Is there any uncertainty between mass and proper length or time?

I was trying to naively draw a parallel between special relativity and the Heisenberg uncertainty principle. I try to understand uncertainty principle as a consequence of 4-position and 4-momentum ...
1
vote
0answers
204 views

Matrix manipulation for Dirac matrices

From the Dirac equation in gamma matrices, we know that $$\gamma^i=\begin{pmatrix} 0 & \sigma^i \\ -\sigma^i & 0 \end{pmatrix}$$ and $$\gamma^0=\begin{pmatrix} I & 0 \\ 0 & -I ...
3
votes
2answers
287 views

Matrix operation in dirac matrices

If we define $\alpha_i$ and $\beta$ as Dirac matrices which satisfy all of the conditions of spin 1/2 particles , p defines the momentum of the particle, then how can we get the matrix form ? ...
11
votes
1answer
460 views

How is quantum mechanics compatible with the speed of light limit?

Consider a free electron in space. Let us suppose we measure its position to be at point A with a high degree of accuracy at time 0. If I recall my QM correctly, as time passes the wave function ...
3
votes
1answer
79 views

Empirical meaning of relativity in the context of QM

In special relativity an event E is mapped to coordinates (x,t) in one inertial frame, and to coordinates (x',t') in another, and SR provides the relation between (x,t) and (x',t'). What is the ...
7
votes
1answer
473 views

Classical vs. Quantum use of the spin 4-vector

I have a few basic questions about the Pauli-Lubanski spin 4-vector S. I've used it in quantum mechanical calculations as an operator, that is to say each of the components of S is a matrix operator ...
2
votes
2answers
484 views

Two photons of different frequencies collide to create electron and positron

A photon of frequency f, and another of frequency f' (take f' as given) collide to create an electron-positron pair. The frequency f is such that when the collision is head on, there is exactly enough ...