7
votes
3answers
743 views

Maxwell's Equations using Differential Forms

Maxwell's Equations written with usual vector calculus are $$\nabla \cdot E=\rho/\epsilon_0 \qquad \nabla \cdot B=0$$ $$\nabla\times E=-\dfrac{\partial B}{\partial t} \qquad\nabla\times ...
4
votes
1answer
204 views

Galilean invariance of a subset of Maxwell equations

I read in Feynman's proof of Maxwell equations the statement that the subset of Maxwell equations comming from the Bianchi identity: $$ \nabla \cdot {\bf B} = 0, \quad \nabla \times {\bf E} + ...
4
votes
4answers
523 views

Do Maxwell's equations independently impose constraints on the speed of light?

My question is about the relations and equations that makes us to impose constraints on the velocity at which electromagnetic waves propagate. Do Maxwell's equations independently impose constraints ...
0
votes
2answers
1k views

Lorentz and Galilean transformation

I read about Lorentz and Galilean transformation in a book of modern physics some days back, but couldn't clearly understand the difference between the two? Also it was stated there that maxwell's ...
3
votes
1answer
216 views

Faraday's Law and Galilean Invariance

In Jackson's text he says that Faraday law is actually: $$ \oint_{\partial \Sigma} \mathbf{E} \cdot \mathrm{d}\boldsymbol{\ell} = -k\iint_{\Sigma} \frac{\partial \mathbf B}{\partial t} \cdot ...
1
vote
2answers
551 views

Special Relativity: Transforming Maxwell's equations

I'm working through Einstein's original 1905 paper*, and I'm having trouble with the section on the transformation of Maxwell's equations from rest to moving frame. The paper proceeds as follows: ...
15
votes
4answers
716 views

Why do Maxwell's equations contain each of a scalar, vector, pseudovector and pseudoscalar equation?

Maxwell's equations, in differential form, are $$\left\{\begin{align} \vec\nabla\cdot\vec{E}&=~\rho/\epsilon_0,\\ \vec\nabla\times\vec B~&=~\mu_0\vec J+\epsilon_0\mu_0\frac{\partial\vec ...
5
votes
4answers
256 views

The necessity of the B field

It is fairly easy using basic special relativity to arrive at the conclusion that the magnetic force effect on nearby charges of wires carrying currents on nearby charges is only due to the length ...
3
votes
3answers
732 views

Maxwell equations invariant under Lorentz transformation but not Galilean transformations

Why Maxwell equations are not invariant under Galilean transformations, but invariant under Lorentz transformations? What is the deep physical meaning behind it?
1
vote
2answers
590 views

Lorentz Invariance of Maxwell Equations

I am curious to see a simple demonstration of how special relativity leads to Lorentz Invariance of the Maxwell Equations. Differential form will suffice.
2
votes
2answers
190 views

Applying $\nabla\times\mathbf{B} = \mu_0\mathbf{J}$ in the presence of magnetic shielding

2012-06-13 - Revised question in experimental format (This is a thought experiment for which RF experts may have an immediate answer.) I'll assume (I could be wrong) the possibility of creating a ...
2
votes
4answers
506 views

How is this classical “paradox” resolved in electromagnetism?

A magnet and a coil move relative to each other. In the frame of reference of the magnet, there is a magnetic field and consequently a force acting on the charges in the coil according to the Lorentz ...
2
votes
2answers
413 views

A Paradox in Special Relativity

Two inertial frames K and k’ are considered. They are in relative uniform motion along the x-x’ direction with relative speed =v. In the frame K’ we have a cuboidal piece of dielectric [at rest wrt ...
36
votes
9answers
4k views

Can Maxwell's equations be derived from Coulomb's Law and Special Relativity?

As an exercise I sat down and derived the magnetic field produced by moving charges for a few contrived situations. I started out with Coulomb's Law and Special Relativity. For example, I derived the ...