0
votes
1answer
62 views

Electromagnetism in flat space

I want to get a deeper understanding of how Electric and Magnetic fields transform under Lorentz transformation. That is how to start from gauge transformation of Electric and Magnetic fields $$E= ...
0
votes
0answers
37 views

Relation involving the Lorentz transformation and the inverse of its transpose

The relation I was referring to in the title is $${\Lambda_a}^b= \eta_{ac} {L^c}_d \eta^{db}$$ where ${\Lambda_a}^b$ is the inverse transpose of $L$, the Lorentz transformation. I was wondering ...
4
votes
2answers
562 views

Is special relativity a special case of general relativity, qualitatively?

Since Einstein name his theory Special Relativity and General Relativity, there should be some expected relationship between them, particularly "Special Relativity" being a special case of the more ...
3
votes
1answer
81 views

Thought experiment: Tethered galaxies - to the extreme

If two rocks were tied together with a tight, absurdly long, non-elastic rope, and placed on planets at either end of Earth's observable universe - or beyond - What would happen? Is the structural ...
2
votes
0answers
50 views

Deformation of light-cone

In the paper The geometry of free fall and light propagation by Ehlers and his colleagues (Gen. Relativ. Gravit. 44 no. 6, pp. 1587–1609 (2012)), when the authors introduce the differentiable ...
4
votes
2answers
216 views

Metric tensor in special and general relativity

I'm having trouble understanding the metric tensor in general relativity. What I've understood so far has come from my course lecture notes used in conjunction with "The Road to Reality" by Roger ...
3
votes
2answers
120 views

Frame dragging — is there a “non-tiny” example?

Now. As I understand it, in fact, the earth (10^25 kg) creates a very small, very tiny, frame dragging effect. Indeed, we have measured this using satellite experiments. So, the Earth (10^25 kg) ...
2
votes
0answers
65 views

Gravitational atraction of fast object [duplicate]

Let's imagine a asteroid that travels with 0.99999999999999999c. (I know it's impossible). Anyway... Relativistic mass of such object would be almost equal to earth's stationary mass. Now let's ...
0
votes
1answer
98 views

Does physics recognize the particle of light separately from the wave of light? [closed]

To frame this question, we need to assume that time freezes when traveling at the speed of light. This is theoretically congruent with Einstein's theory of relativity and the theory of time dilation, ...
1
vote
1answer
133 views

GPS Satellite - Special Relativity

I'm going through an old relativity assignment, and I've been asked to calculate the time dilation for a satellite which orbits the earth in 12 hours at 26000km from the surface, and travels at a ...
3
votes
3answers
281 views

Link between Special relativity and Newtons gravitational law

If I make the two statements: General relativity is an extension of special relativity that accounts for gravity. Newton's law of gravitation is a special case of general relativity for when the ...
2
votes
1answer
77 views

Black holes and Time Dilation at the horizon

What is the difference between proper time and the observer time? Whilst thinking about Black holes, when we see the Schwarzschild metric $$c^2\tau ^2 = \left ( 1 - \frac{r_{s}}{r} \right )c^2t^2 - ...
0
votes
4answers
96 views

Would infinite time elapse relative to an outside observer if an object was completely at rest?

Here's my reasoning... time dilation due to velocity: t'=t√(1-v^2) v expressed as a % of the speed of light. If you are moving through distance at the speed of light, to an observer at rest relative ...
2
votes
1answer
62 views

Lorentz transformation via light clocks in parallel direction

In order to derive the Lorentz transformation one can use the picture of a light clock. A Photons bounces back and forth between two mirrors. This is then observed in two different inertial systems. ...
2
votes
0answers
81 views

A Subtle Connection Between Time Dilation in SR and GR - Why is this so?

I've been reading a book on General Relativity lately (Gravitation and Cosmology, Weinberg), and I was reading about the weak field approximation. It derived the time dilation in a weak gravitational ...
0
votes
1answer
73 views

Will we feel the gravity of a star 10 light years away for the next 10 years if, somehow, it vanishes today from its position? [duplicate]

I was watching a relativity video, and although I am not sure, I felt that it was trying to tell that the effect of gravitation of a body is instantaneous, in the sense that a sudden change in the ...
1
vote
0answers
22 views

4-acceleration of rotating frame

Consider the 3-dimensional Minkowski space $$ ds^2=dt'^2-dr'^2-r'^2d\phi'^2 $$ Now we transform it into a rotating frame: $$ t'=t,r'=r,\phi'=\phi+\omega t $$ Then the metric becomes $$ ...
0
votes
0answers
50 views

Conditions that the coordinate must satisfy in order to become local inertial

Consider the coordinate transformation $$ \tilde x^a=x^a+\frac{1}{2}\Gamma^a_{bc}x^bx^c $$ I have shown that at the origin $O=(0,0,0,0)$, $$ \frac{\partial\tilde g_{ab}}{\partial\tilde x^c}=0 $$ ...
0
votes
0answers
33 views

(Special Relativity) Points that can be seen by an observer

Let the metric be $$ ds^2=(1+gz)^2dt^2-dx^2-dy^2-dz^2 $$ where $g$ is a positive constant. Let an observer be stationary at $x=y=0$ on the surface $z=0$ and look upwards at an angle $\theta$, how ...
0
votes
0answers
53 views

Exercise Lorentz Transformations

I have 2 inertial frames, both are in relative motion along the x axis moving with constant velocity $v_x$. It is called with Standard figuration where the Lorentz transformations relate the ...
4
votes
1answer
107 views

Infinitesimal transformations for a relativistic particle

The action of a free relativistic particles can be given by $$S=\frac{1}{2}\int d\tau \left(e^{-1}(\tau)g_{\mu\nu}(X)X^\mu(\tau)X^\nu(\tau)-e(\tau)m^2\right).$$ If we then make an infinitesimal ...
3
votes
2answers
216 views

The wave equation in general relativity, special relativity, and Cartesian coordinates

The relativistic wave equation is $$\square\varphi=\rho$$ where $\varphi$ is the field, $\rho$ is the source, and $\square$ is the D'Alembert operator, defined by ...
1
vote
2answers
129 views

Confused about the concept of time and time dilation [duplicate]

I am having a hard time understanding what is time. If scientists define time as a multiple of caesium frequency, then time itself is dependent on motion, so what if I have a number of particles that ...
1
vote
0answers
90 views

Newtonian Physics vs Relativity - the results [closed]

Does anyone have examples of the results calculated by using Newtonian physics vs the same ones calculated using relativity, compared with real measurements obtained in those experiments? Please ...
1
vote
5answers
149 views

Can the equivalence principle be shown to follow from special relativity?

Einstein showed in various papers that the energy content of a body was a measure of its inertial mass. If you increase the internal energy of a system while keeping the center of energy at rest, its ...
0
votes
1answer
53 views

velocity in inertial and nontial frames

I got confused about the difference between the last term of both pictures. In the first one, we have w x r, but in the second we have w x r underlined. Does anyone have a better explanation? They ...
1
vote
0answers
61 views

Are there 'special' cases for when special relativity can be applied for accelerating bodies?

I have the following theoretical situation: A space station modeled as a ring in free space is rotating about its centre point at a high speed. I am trying to work out where time flows slower. From ...
0
votes
2answers
122 views

Can relativistic momentum (photons) be used as propulsion for 'free' after the initial generation?

In discussing this question about propelling a spacecraft with photons and their relativistic momentum, the author asked that I restate my comment as another question. If photons can really be used ...
2
votes
0answers
146 views

How did the scientific community receive Einstein's theories when he published them? [closed]

By now, we have had multiple indications through observations and experiments that Einstein's theories on general and special relativity are correct. We recently had our second observation of ...
14
votes
2answers
421 views

Why isn't general relativity the obvious thing to try after special relativity?

To preface my question, I ask this as a mathematics student, so I don't have a very good sense of how physicists think. Here is the historical context I'm imagining (in particular taking into account ...
0
votes
1answer
91 views

What happens if a body free-falls at a certain speed?

It is known that a body falling to the ground is affected by gravity, and its velocity increases by 9.8 m/s per second. But when this body is falling, and it reaches the speed of 340 m/s (the speed of ...
4
votes
2answers
299 views

Can special/general relativity be derived from the standard model?

Can special/general relativity be derived from the standard model? For example the time dilatation in strong gravitation? My feeling is yes, but I am not quite sure.
4
votes
2answers
216 views

Unitary representations of the diffeomorphism group in curved spacetime

In (special) relativistic quantum mechanics there is a standard argument that says that the (rigged) Hilbert space of states $H$ should be equipped with a projective unitary representation $U$ of the ...
0
votes
2answers
423 views

How does time dilate in a gravitational field having a relative velocity of v with the field?

Consider a Mass on earth. The time dilation on the surface of Earth is $$T' = T \sqrt{1 - \frac{2GM}{rc^2}}$$ Now if the mass is moving around the earth at velocity of v w.r.t Earth, what will be ...
2
votes
3answers
444 views

Does a moving object curve space-time as its velocity increases?

We always hear how gravity bends space-time; why shouldn't velocity? Consider a spaceship traveling through space at a reasonable fraction of the speed of light. If this spaceship, according to ...
5
votes
2answers
145 views

Can a revolving body self-gravitate?

If a body is revolving around a point at radius R with tangential velocity V, does General Relativity predict that at some tangential speed, the body will revolve around the point without any external ...
2
votes
1answer
97 views

Physical meaning of the Rindler hyperbola vertex and the Rindler lines

Two questions regarding the Rindler diagram: 1) Does the vertex of a given hyperbola in the diagram have physical meaning? I know it is the inverse of the constant proper acceleration ($\alpha$) ...
0
votes
2answers
96 views

What does this summation mean in relativity?

Equation 1.2 of 't Hooft's Introduction to General Relativity gives the Lorentz transformations: $$ (x^\mu)' = \sum\limits_{\nu = 1}^4 {L^\mu}_\nu x^\nu $$ Is this the sum of four square matrices ...
1
vote
0answers
44 views

Allowed transformations in General Relativity [duplicate]

So in Special Relativity we have: $$ \Lambda \eta \Lambda^T=\eta $$ Is there an analagous formula for the metric in General Relativity?
1
vote
0answers
72 views

Relativistic Black Hole? [duplicate]

So recently, looking at high energy particles through the lens of General and Special Relativity has peaked my interest. One thing I was considering, using the electron as the first example, is as ...
2
votes
1answer
177 views

Proper time in Nordstrom gravity

This wikipedia article claims that there are two interpretations of Nordstrom's scalar theory of gravity: 1) A scalar field theory on flat space. The reason why an apple falls is that its mass is ...
2
votes
2answers
399 views

About the standard derivation of the gravitational redshift

The objective is to derive the gravitational redshift ONLY from the Einstein's equivalence principle (E.E.P.), without using the whole theory of Relativity. This is the standard "informal" derivation ...
2
votes
0answers
67 views

(References) Study of Asymptotically Flat spacetimes

I am interested in studying the asymptotic structure of Minkowski spacetime in General Relativity. I believe most of the work in this area concerns the asymptotic structure of Minkowski space at null ...
0
votes
2answers
183 views

What if a particle falls into the center of a central field? [closed]

Given a central field $U(r)$ satisfies $U(r) \rightarrow -\infty$ when $r \rightarrow 0$, then What if a particle falls into the center of a central field? Can you help me analysis this question in ...
2
votes
1answer
87 views

Why is general relativity only formulated in continuum terms?

So, when we are discussing Newtonian mechanics, we treat particles as point particles. In continuum mechanics, which I understand to be a version in which mass is continuously distributed, we have ...
1
vote
1answer
33 views

Flat space current conservation sign confusion

It is said that in Minkowski spacetime, the current conservation law for the number current $N^\mu$ where $N^0$ is the number density and $N^i, i=1,2,3$ is the particle flux in the $x^i $ direction, ...
1
vote
1answer
200 views

Is mass an inherent property?

Suppose I have an electronic weighing machine placed in a uniform gravitational field. Now I put a mass above it and register the reading. Now I give the system (mass + machine) an impulse so that it ...
1
vote
2answers
286 views

Can a scalar field model gravity? How accurate would be the results? Are there any difficulties with such a model?

Newtonian gravity can be described by the equation: $$ \nabla^2 \phi = 4 \pi \rho G $$ where $\rho$ is the mass density, $\phi$ is the gravitational potential, and G is the universal gravitational ...
3
votes
4answers
841 views

Why acceleration is not relative in General Relativity?

I was thinking of it, If I say: "I'm moving at a velocity $v_1$ relative to a reference frame $M$ then the acceleration will be the derivative of $v_1$ relative to the reference frame $M$." In other ...
16
votes
2answers
375 views

In relativity, can/should every measurement be reduced to measuring a scalar?

Different authors seem to attach different levels of importance to keeping track of the exact tensor valences of various physical quantities. In the strict-Catholic-school-nun camp, we have Burke ...