0
votes
2answers
78 views

$F=ma$ calculation taking relativity into account?

Newton's second law of motion states that $f = ma$. However, in this equation, theoretically there could be a value of $f$ and $m$ that results in an acceleration that is enough to push an object past ...
2
votes
0answers
65 views

Gravitational atraction of fast object [duplicate]

Let's imagine a asteroid that travels with 0.99999999999999999c. (I know it's impossible). Anyway... Relativistic mass of such object would be almost equal to earth's stationary mass. Now let's ...
0
votes
1answer
73 views

Will we feel the gravity of a star 10 light years away for the next 10 years if, somehow, it vanishes today from its position? [duplicate]

I was watching a relativity video, and although I am not sure, I felt that it was trying to tell that the effect of gravitation of a body is instantaneous, in the sense that a sudden change in the ...
0
votes
0answers
55 views

Action-reaction principle in special relativity

Consider a relativistic train of weight $W_t$ in its rest frame. Force transformation equations say that in the planet's frame its weight is reduced to $W_p=\frac{W}{\gamma}$. My question is: what is ...
5
votes
2answers
434 views

Force in Special Relativity

I have a question regarding how force on a body works in the framework of special relativity. As far as I am aware, the equation for force in special relativity is: $$F=m\alpha$$ Where $\alpha$ is the ...
2
votes
0answers
85 views

Consistency of equation with special relativity?

The following is the equation which, I want to know, if it is valid in relativistic domain. Consider two equal charges moving in same direction with velocity $v$ and charge $q$ at a separation of ...
4
votes
2answers
618 views

Relativistic Lorentz force law

If we consider the the relativistic Lorentz force law: $$\frac{d}{dt} (m\gamma \vec{u})=e(\vec{E}+\vec{u} \times \vec{B})$$ How can we deduce: $$\frac{d}{dt} (m\gamma c^2)=e \vec{E} \cdot \vec{u}$$ ...
7
votes
3answers
298 views

Relativistic equivalent of a spring-force?

Usually what helps me understand a concept better in physics is to write a simulation of it. I've got to the point where I'm competent in the basics of special relativity, but, I can't figure out how ...
-3
votes
1answer
64 views

Assuming collision , are there fundamental forces associated with absorbtion?

I just learned that strong and weak nuclear forces relate to decay/emission. I know absorbtion depends on Energy levels(QM) and heat(thermodynamics , kinetic energy , entropy) and E = gamma mc^2 ( ...
2
votes
1answer
525 views

Conservation of Energy in Special Relativity

In classical Newtonian mechanics, from what I understand, conservation of energy stems from the fact that all known forces are conservative forces, and vector calculus tells us that they can be ...
5
votes
1answer
432 views

Lorentz force law in Newtonian relativity

I know that in special relativity Electric and Magnetic fields mix together in different reference frames, but my question is about classical mechanics. It seems weird to me is that the Lorentz Force ...
8
votes
3answers
429 views

Whether $m$ in $E=mc^{2}$ and $F=ma$ are both relativistic mass?

I know that $m$ in $E=mc^{2}$ is the relativistic mass, but can $m$ in $F=ma$ can also be relativistic? If the answer is yes, then can you tell me whether this equation is valid $E=\frac{F}{a}c^{2}$? ...
2
votes
1answer
556 views

How are fundamental forces transmitted?

How are the fundamental forces transmitted? In particular I wonder, are all "processes" local, i.e. without superluminal distant interactions? But if they are local, then particles would have to ...
2
votes
1answer
186 views

Can non-free forces change the rest mass?

While reading Hobsen et al.'s "General Relativity: An Introduction for Physicists", I came across a bit confusing derivation. Multiplying the 4-force and 4-velocity, the following derivation can be ...
6
votes
6answers
562 views

Derive $\frac{\mathrm{d}}{\mathrm{d}t}(\gamma m\mathbf{v}) = e\mathbf{E}$ from elementary principles?

It is experimentally known that the equation of motion for a charge $e$ moving in a static electric field $\mathbf{E}$ is given by: $$\frac{\mathrm{d}}{\mathrm{d}t} (\gamma m\mathbf{v}) = ...