1
vote
4answers
194 views

Detecting absolute motion inside a box

This is not a contradiction and I know it is impossible but still consider a thought experiment by me and point out if something is wrong. See the following picture and then the explanation follows. ...
0
votes
1answer
51 views

velocity in inertial and nontial frames

I got confused about the difference between the last term of both pictures. In the first one, we have w x r, but in the second we have w x r underlined. Does anyone have a better explanation? They ...
0
votes
2answers
49 views

Query into the cumulative velocity of mounted platforms

Consider throwing a stone at an object from rest, it travels at Vms-1. Now throw that stone whilst running at Ums-1. It seems in the latter scenario the total speed of stone is V + U. Now imagine ...
1
vote
2answers
91 views

State of constant motion

Why does an object remains in its state of constant motion if there are no forces acting on that object? My understanding is that all the energy of the motion will be kept inside and a change in the ...
10
votes
2answers
196 views

Conservation of phase space volume in Rindler space-time

Let us consider Rindler space-time, i.e. Minkowski space-time as seen by a constantly accelerating observer. My question is, does Liouville's theorem, i.e. the conservation of phase space volume in ...
3
votes
0answers
118 views

What is the theoretical upper limit on the rigidity of a material?

Take a perfectly rigid metal rod of length $\ell$ and some uniform linear density. Place one end at $(0,0)$ and the other at $(0, \ell)$. Over some reasonably short time interval $t$, perhaps on the ...
0
votes
2answers
169 views

What if a particle falls into the center of a central field? [closed]

Given a central field $U(r)$ satisfies $U(r) \rightarrow -\infty$ when $r \rightarrow 0$, then What if a particle falls into the center of a central field? Can you help me analysis this question in ...
0
votes
0answers
114 views

Problems at arriving on the fresnel drag coefficient $k=1-{1 \over n^2}$

I was studying about the Fizeau Water Experiment of 1851(I know the aether drag hypothesis has been replaced by Relativity, but I still wish to know the mathematical thinking about aether). So at one ...
2
votes
0answers
83 views

Consistency of equation with special relativity?

The following is the equation which, I want to know, if it is valid in relativistic domain. Consider two equal charges moving in same direction with velocity $v$ and charge $q$ at a separation of ...
1
vote
0answers
40 views

Calculate the acceleration of the trailing muon bunch

Two separate suitably short but intense bunches of muons, "A" and "B", are both supposed to be constantly accelerating (in an otherwise sufficiently flat region) with constant proper acceleration ...
1
vote
2answers
369 views

Why does weak equivalence principle say gravity is equivalent to acceleration?

I am told that the weak equivalent principle, that $m_i=m_g$ (inertial and gravitational masses are equivalent) is equivalent to the statement that in a small system you can't tell whether you are in ...
5
votes
3answers
572 views

Extended Rigid Bodies in Special Relativity

I was reading Landau & Lifshitz's Classical Theory of Fields and I noticed that they mention that an extended rigid body isn't "relativistically correct". For example, if you consider a rigid ...
6
votes
2answers
295 views

The notion called aether

I am trying to learn relativity theory and going through an introductory text on special relativity. I stumbled on the Michelson-Morley experiment. The book claims (accounts) that the result of this ...
10
votes
2answers
841 views

Deriving the action and the Lagrangian for a free point particle in Special Relativity

My question relates to Landau & Lifshitz, Classical Theory of Field, Chapter 2: Relativistic Mechanics, Paragraph 8: The principle of least action. As stated there, to determine the action ...
8
votes
8answers
671 views

Is “Causality” the equivalent of a claim that the future is predictable based on the present and the past?

In classical (Newtonian) mechanics, every observer had the same past and the same future and if you had perfect knowledge about the current state of all particles in the universe, you could ...
19
votes
3answers
1k views

Phase space volume and relativity

Much of statistical mechanics is derived from Liouville's theorem, which can be stated as "the phase space volume occupied by an ensemble of isolated systems is conserved over time." (I'm mostly ...
1
vote
1answer
169 views

Why doesn't relativistic momentum appear conserved in this frame?

Suppose I have an inelastic head on collision between two idential particles of mass $m$ that come to rest in the centre of momentum frame where relativistic momentum is obviously conserved. If I now ...
2
votes
2answers
577 views

Calculate relativistic boost to COM frame from two arbitary velocities?

Looking in Goldstein's book, there doesn't seem to be a standard formula to calculate the COM frame velocity for two particles, from their relativistic velocities in the lab frame, although it is done ...
3
votes
1answer
581 views

Can relativistic kinetic energy be derived from Newtonian kinetic energy?

Relativistic kinetic energy is usually derived by assuming a scalar quantity is conserved in an elastic collision thought experiment, and deriving the expression for this quantity. To me, it looks ...
2
votes
2answers
541 views

Is the change in kinetic energy of a particle frame independent?

Intuitively, I would expect the change in kinetic energy of a particle to be frame independent. It just doesn't "feel" right that between two points in time-space, one frame should measure a change in ...
3
votes
2answers
152 views

Does locality emerge from (classical) Lagrangian mechanics?

Consider a (classical) system of several interacting particles. Can it be shown that, if the Lagrangian of such a system is Lorenz invariant, there cannot be any space-like influences between the ...
1
vote
0answers
373 views

How equivalent are heat energy and work energy in connection with a spinning flywheel?

Let's say we have two identical spinning flywheels, that have arbitrary geometry, and are made of copper. Now we apply some heat energy at the center point of flywheel A, causing it to slow down a ...
4
votes
1answer
319 views

Some questions about the logics of the principles of independence of motion and composition of motion

In high-school level textbooks* one encounters often the principles of independence of motion and that of composition (or superpositions) of motions. In this context this is used as "independence of ...
3
votes
2answers
605 views

Relativistic effects

When are relativistic effects justifiably negligible? (I know that that is true for 'small velocities', but how small is 'small enough'?) 0.1c, 0.01c, etc.? And how does one properly justify that? I ...
3
votes
2answers
362 views

How did L.H. Thomas derive his 1927 expressions for an electron with an axis?

I'm looking at the 1927 paper of Thomas, The Kinematics of an Electron with an Axis, where he shows that the instantaneous co-moving frame of an accelerating electron rotates and moves with some ...
11
votes
2answers
496 views

Essential background for QFT study

The preface to Mark Srednicki's "Quantum Field Theory" says that to be prepared for the book, one must recognize and understand the following equations: $$\frac{d\sigma}{d\Omega} = ...
5
votes
5answers
2k views

Maximum speed of a rocket with a potential of relativistic speeds

Ultimately, the factor limiting the maximum speed of a rocket is: the amount of fuel it carries the speed of ejection of the gases the mass of the rocket the length of the rocket ...
6
votes
2answers
251 views

Why absoluteness of time implies galilean transformations?

In Landau course, vol.1 Mechanics, one finds the statement: ...the absoluteness of time necessarily implies that the ordinary law of composition of velocities is applicable to all phenomena. I ...
1
vote
2answers
273 views

Under what conditions do the Galilean transformatons become more accurate?

For S and S' in standard configuration, the Galilean transformations are: x' = x - vt, y' = y, z' = z, t' = t From the Lorentz transformations for v << c: x' = x - vt, y' = y, z' = z, t' = t ...
13
votes
2answers
2k views

Is kinetic energy a relative quantity? Will it make inconsistent equations when applying it to the conservation of energy equations?

If the velocity is a relative quantity, will it make inconsistent equations when applying it to the conservation of energy equations? For example: In the train moving at $V$ relative to ground, ...
2
votes
3answers
553 views

Why is it hopeless to view differential geometry as the limit of a discrete geometry?

This is a follow-up question to Introductions to discrete space-time: Why is this line of thought hopeless? Classical mechanics can be understood as the limit of relativistic mechanics $RM_c$ ...