As a consequence of the Lorentz transformations, time and space transform into each other when changing reference frame. This calls for a unified description: Minkowski spacetime.

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103 views

Is imaginary time a fifth dimension? [duplicate]

I've read that by introducing the concept of imaginary time, the dimension of time can be treated like a spatial dimension mathematically. Assuming, without imaginary time, one considers the universe ...
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2answers
84 views

Does spacetime have a “mass” value? or What is “Spacetime” made out of?

When measuring the MASS within the Universe, does "space" or "spacetime" have a value? I only ask, because when speaking of expansion, space is expanding. Could it be possible, to reverse the ...
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55 views

Alternate theories of space and time [on hold]

Do mainstream theories in physics make implicit assumptions about the nature of space and time? In particular, are there any theories which implicitly assume that space and time are continuous, or is ...
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3answers
222 views

Where in, Einstein’s “On the Electrodynamics of Moving Bodies” (Relativity), is “Time” reasonably shown to exist, or why is it a valid assumption? [closed]

Given the widespread acceptance that “Einstein’s Relativity” reasonably proves the existence of Space-‘Time’, and thus “Time”... Can any member of the Physics StackExchange please show precisely ...
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2answers
91 views

Is space-time a property of mass?

Imagine looking at a quasar millions of light years away. From your perspective, a photon emitted by the quasar has spent millions of years travelling through space, and its trajectory has been ...
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0answers
30 views

Does a body curve spacetime at higher velocities? [duplicate]

Suppose we have two objects where the distance over time decreases. Now, as I understand it, general relativity says that we can observe the Universe from the perspective of both objects an get a ...
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0answers
32 views

Does infinity really exist? [duplicate]

Does infinity really exist, or is it just part of the fabric of our imaginations? Great mathematicians, like Gauss or Pointcaré, said that actual infinity does not exist.infinity is mathematical ...
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0answers
26 views

Relative time dilation in Schwarzschild metric

Let's say we use the Schwarzschild metric to model the curved spacetime around a planet of mass $M$ and radius $R_0$. One clock $A$ is hovering at distance $R_A$ > $R_0$ with the help of rockets, a ...
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2answers
199 views

Spacetime diagram of a collapse of a rotating star

There is a well-known "standard" spacetime diagram (Kruskal and Penrose) for the collapse of a spherically symmetric star to a Schwarzschild black hole (for example here, or here in EF), which stands ...
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1answer
583 views

Gravity is curved geometry: A fact of nature or model-dependent interpretation?

We are regularly taught in high-schools and universities that, according to General Relativity (GR), gravity is nothing but a manifestation of space-time curvature (which, in its turn, is caused by ...
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2answers
34 views

What are the end points in the action integral of field theory?

In the mechanics of particles when we apply the principle of the least action the two end points are two spatial coordinates. Therefore, if we consider the variation of the action with respect to the ...
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What does it mean that the universe is “infinite”?

This question is about cosmology and general relativity. I understand the difference between the universe and the observable universe. What I am not really clear about is what is meant when I read ...
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523 views

The Big Bang in an infinite universe

If the universe is spatially infinite (and assuming, if it makes a difference, that we don't have eternal inflation), what actually happened 13.7 billion years ago? Was the energy density infinite (or ...
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1answer
34 views

Infinite Universe and Big Bang

A common view now in the physics community is that the Universe is infinite in extent (which makes Hubble sphere an infinitely small part of the Universe). On the other hand, there is the Big Bang ...
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1answer
62 views

What happens to black holes if/when the universe “ends”

I've heard several ideas about what happens to the universe when it dies, and they range from infinite expansion and heat death, to a "big crunch". In the event that something like a "big crunch" ...
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1answer
42 views

What it would look like to observe people with a different time flows?

As I learned, that the bigger gravity source you are influenced by the more slow time ticks for you, the farther away you are from a gravity source the faster times ticks. So Imagine two different ...
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1answer
53 views

Why is $\mathbb{R}^1$ different than Euclidean space $\mathbb{E}^1$? Roger Penrose road to reality

In Roger's book, the following is stated: (I'm paraphrasing because my book is in spanish) "We consider time as part of a space, namely $\mathbb{E}^1$, instead of it just being a copy of the line ...
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5answers
1k views

How to measure the curvature of the space-time?

I know G.R. change our vision of space and time as a unique surface than can bend. We can associate the curvature of the space-time as the gravity created by the mass of planets, stars... But how can ...
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1answer
37 views

Convergent series in the real world with equal time for each term

A few months ago someone was explaining a philosophical principle in Aikido (a martial art) which involved a convergent series. The analogy he used was that, say you have a pool, and each day the pool ...
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0answers
46 views

Visualizing bending of Spacetime around a heavy object

The commonly used example of viewing bent SpaceTime around a heavy object such as the Sun is the Trampoline. However, this image is limited as it shows only the bending below the Sun. What about the ...
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1answer
231 views

Questions about MTW's “thousand” tests of the Einstein principle

In Misner, Thorne, Wheeler (henceforth written as "MTW"), "Gravitation", Box 16.4, there's an experimental setup construction (or method) presented by which "Each geodesic clock is constructed and ...
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1answer
83 views

If a point r lies in the boundary of the chronological future of another point p, why does the chronological future of r belong to that of p?

I am studying the global causality of the spacetime. Here, I come across a problem. Suppose a point $r\in \partial I^+(p)$. $I^+(p)$ is the chronological future of a different point $p$ in ...
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1answer
35 views

The Higgs field and spacetime intervals

The Higgs field imparts a rest mass to certain fundamental particles, but it also seems to do something more interesting. Particles that don't couple to the Higgs field, i.e. the rest-massless, are ...
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2answers
60 views

Gravitational force of several massive bodies, from the viewpoint of general relativity

According to Wald's GR, "absolute gravitation force has no meaning". The text goes on to describe two cases: one where a gravitational force can be defined, and one in which it cannot. I'd like to ...
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1answer
30 views

Higgs field and the null geodesic

How does coupling to the Higgs field take a particle with a spacetime interval of zero and give it a non-zero value, i.e, how does it move it off the null geodesic? [of course, the Higgs field is ...
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21 views

Do three spacelike separated events on the same lightcone satisfy the triangle inequality?

If three events are (pairwise) spacelike related to each other then their interval ratios do not necessarily satisfy the triangle inequality. (For example, consider the case that two of the three ...
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3answers
80 views

Is it possible to express various nonlinear motions as straight lines in transformed spacetime?

I am trying to understand simple examples of space-time curvature. Assume for the moment that $c$ is infinite (classical curvature due to Newton's laws). Also, I will only consider 1+1-dimensional ...
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1answer
56 views

A true singularity at $t=0$, coordinate independent Big Bang

Consider a flat Robertson-Walker metric. When we say that there is a singularity at $t=0$, clearly it is a coordinate dependent statement. So it is a "candidate" singularity. In principle there is ...
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3answers
93 views

Is acceleration caused by curvature or space or time or both?

I'm trying to get a hold of the idea of gravity in general relativity and spacetime. I've seen plenty of demonstrations of the rubber mat analogy to describe gravity and spacetime curvature. Is this ...
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3answers
81 views

Is the world we are living in discretized? [duplicate]

I do not know how to use professional words to ask my question, so I will try to use a layman language. Please bear with me for a moment. A ROUGH GUESS The world our eyes are seeing every moment is ...
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2answers
64 views

Meaning of general covariance

Quoting from Wald's GR: In the context of special relativity, the principle of general covariance states that the spacetime metric $\eta_{ab}$, is the only quantity pertaining to spacetime ...
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0answers
39 views

Is time dilation a mechanical slowdown only? [duplicate]

I've recently read about the time dilation occurs at very high speeds. But I'm really wondering if it is just a mechanical slowdown of the clock only? What if we use clocks that does not use moving ...
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1answer
82 views

Einsteins gravity Space time

I'm having a difficulty in understanding Einstein's version of gravity as "space time curvature" (I could be a total physics idiot, please point out !). How does an object on the surface of earth ...
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2answers
397 views

Regarding time dilation and particle entanglement

I have a question regarding time dilation and particle entanglement. As I have read a few forums and questions here, I am aware both aspects do not contradict each other. Still, a question that I am ...
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3answers
100 views

Spacetime, space observables and time observables

It appears to me that the concepts of space and time play a privileged role in Physical Theories. If we look at classical non-relativistic theories such as point particle mechanics, rigid body ...
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1answer
624 views

Questions after watching the movie Interstellar [closed]

Awesome movie, but as a physics student, some questions do crop up When they travel to the watery planet, they say that 1 hour on this planet is 7 yrs om earth. How is this possible? Is the planet ...
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1answer
55 views

What will I see if I travelled to a distant planet in 100 times faster than speed of light and look back? [closed]

Consider this scenario. I enter a space ship at 10:00 AM, it starts to move at a speed 100 times faster than light, I travel for 55 mins. And then slow down to very much less than speed of light and ...
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83 views

What Would Negative Mass Do To Spacetime?

It's known that positive mass bends space-time to create a curvature. But if something had negative mass what would it do? Make it flat or like a crest?
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1answer
120 views

Do we exist in multiple dimensions?

I have heard that there are 12 spatial dimensions. Does this mean that this many are possible, or that 12 dimensions actually exist? If the latter, then do the same things that exist in 3 dimensions ...
2
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1answer
61 views

Does space-time cause time dilation at relativistic speeds?

I'm trying to understand the concept of the space-time continuum and it's effect on time dilation but am having difficulty with parts of it. To me there seems to be two separate components to time ...
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0answers
44 views

Examples of warped product manifolds?

Bishop and O'Neil defined warped product manifolds. Space-times are good examples of such warped product manifolds. Is there a famous and important example of space-times $I×M$ where $M$ is itself a ...
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2answers
198 views

What is the physical meaning of the Eddington - Finkelstein coordinates?

I want to see a some physical process (experimental) that could explain the many transformations of coordinates into this mathematical procedure. (really two transformations, but i think that is a ...
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3answers
117 views

Understanding emergent phenomena in the block universe. (Reworded question)

Each person exists as an unchanging 4D worldtube in the block universe. At each slice of the worldtube there is a present, past and future. However, there is a black box* which appears to exist in ...
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4answers
70 views

Question about dot product of four vectors?

I am looking back over some old notes and see that I have written $\bar{p}=\left(\overset{E}{\vec p}\right)$ and $\bar{x}=\left(\overset{t}{\vec x}\right)$ (using Plank units) And then $\bar{p} ...
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1answer
29 views

Direction of formation of Black Hole

When Black holes are getting formed, in which direction in space they form? For example, I have read that formation of Black Holes is same as forming a hole on a rubber sheet by a spherical ball, so ...
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2answers
54 views

Why don't objects following a geodesic maintain their rotational state?

If I throw a ball into the air, it comes back down because that is the shape of spacetime and the ball is just following it. But if I paint a spot on the ball and throw it upwards with no rotational ...
5
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2answers
153 views

Are the implications of an infinite universe necessarily so unsettling

I have often heard it said (by professional cosmologists) that if the universe is infinite, then there necessarily exist infinitely many copies of me repeated throughout. The reasoning seems to be ...
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0answers
15 views

Reaction force due to the curvature and gradient drift [closed]

We know that a charged particle will have a drift velocity in both a curved magnetic field and when there is a transverse spatial gradient in the magnitude of the magnetic field. This drift velocity ...
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1answer
50 views

Newtonian tidal forces and curvature

Today in my physics class, my lecturer said something which confused me. He said: "Newtonian tidal forces are reinterpreted as a manifestation of curvature in General Relativity". Now I know what ...