2
votes
0answers
20 views

Can isotropy (or anisotropy) be expressed in terms of intervals ($s^2$) between pairs of events?

Considering a set $\mathcal S$ of events and given the values of intervals $s^2[~P, Q~] \in \mathbb R$ for all pairs of events $P, Q \in \mathcal S$ (up to a common non-zero scale factor): how can ...
7
votes
2answers
101 views

What are the linear maps which preserve the time-like cone?

I'm looking at the set of time-like vectors: $\mathcal{T}_+ = \{ x \in \mathbb{R}^4 \mbox{ s.t. } x^T \eta x \geq 0 \:, x^0\geq 0\} $, where $\eta = \mbox{diag}(1, -1, -1, -1)$. I want to be able to ...
0
votes
0answers
47 views

How to express “curvature scalars” in terms of "discrete curvature values $\kappa_n$?

We know from MTW [1] and Synge [2] how, for participants who were (pairwise) rigid to each other, it may be determined whether or not they were straight to each other, plane to each other, or ...
3
votes
1answer
84 views

Are there any restrictions on building the topology of spacetime out of the complement of open balls?

I assume that for a Lorentzian manifold (i.e. with Minkowski signature), the analog of an open ball is the interior of a light cone. My question is motivated by the observation that whereas any point ...
3
votes
1answer
128 views

An issue about the compactness and the existence of CTCs

There is a well known fact that a compact spacetime necessarily contains a closed timelike curve (CTC). Proof can be found in several books on GR (e.g. Hawking, Ellis, Proposition 6.4.2), and in ...
11
votes
4answers
602 views

Can physics get rid of the continuum?

Almost every physical equation I can think of (even though I don't actually feel comfortable beyond the scope of classical mechanics and macroscopic thermodynamics, as that's enough for dealing with ...
2
votes
1answer
413 views

Orientability of spacetime

In many theoretical setups it is implicitly assumed that the underlying manifold (i.e. spacetime) is orientable. Then our analysis depends on this implicit assumption. For example, Stokes' theorem ...
4
votes
2answers
231 views

Is the Assumption That Space-time Has to Be a Continuum Just a Matter of Mathematical Taste?

Is the assumption that space-time has to be a continuum just a matter of mathematical taste? Isn't there any physical significance associated with it?
9
votes
5answers
1k views

Hubble's law and conservation of energy

If all distances are constantly increasing, as Hubble's law say, then lots of potential energies of form ~$\frac{1}{r}$ changes, so how is the total energy of the Universe conserved with Hubble's ...