2
votes
2answers
48 views

Is my interpretation of how a gravitational wave is formed correct?

I'm sure many here are familiar with the following image showing the 2D representation of how the fabric of spacetime is warped by the presence of mass:- Can this fabric be interpreted as an ...
0
votes
3answers
91 views

Why does time slow down the closer you are to a mass?

When ever i look this up all I get is sites saying how its because general relativity says "-" why does it do it though? it is because there is more motion near gravity than further away? Or is it ...
-1
votes
1answer
53 views

Gravity in spacetime

Can the effect of gravity in spacetime be thought of as if nearby particles have a tendency to "align" their four velocity direction? I.e. "to point in the same direction".
0
votes
3answers
54 views

Quantum Scales and the Flatness of Space-time

I know that on the smallest scales, general relativity predicts that space-time is flat. But I've also read that space-time can be described as a sort of "quantum foam" for distances smaller than the ...
2
votes
1answer
123 views

How exactly and WHY does matter affect space-time? [closed]

According to general relativity, inertial mass and gravitational mass are the same, and all accelerated reference frames (such as a uniformly rotating reference frame with its proper time dilation) ...
1
vote
1answer
50 views

If a point r lies in the boundary of the chronological future of another point p, why does the chronological future of r belong to that of p?

I am studying the global causality of the spacetime. Here, I come across a problem. Suppose a point $r\in \partial I^+(p)$. $I^+(p)$ is the chronological future of a different point $p$ in ...
3
votes
1answer
142 views

How far can something travel in a straight line?

Suppose you have an object some distance from you and moving at a velocity different to the Hubble velocity you'd expect at that point. How does the motion of this object change with time? Does it ...
1
vote
0answers
43 views

In an Evolving Block Universe, does the growth rate of the universe give the value of C

In an Evolving Block Universe (http://arxiv.org/abs/0912.0808, http://arxiv.org/abs/1407.7243) the future does not exist. The present moment is the bounding edge of the universe in the time dimension. ...
0
votes
0answers
75 views

Minkowski to Euclidean

When dealing with solutions to Einstein's equations given by a 4d metric with signature $(-,+,+,+)$, we're able to move to Euclidean space using some transformation so that our signature is now ...
1
vote
2answers
144 views

The Alcubierre drive and closed timelike curves

Under what conditions would it be possible to create closed timelike curves, assuming an Alcubierre drive could exist? Would it be possible to have the latter without the former? See here for ...
2
votes
2answers
116 views

How can space be euclidean when light bends?

I have read people arguing that tridimensional space sections of space time continuum (whatever its number of dimensions) appears to be euclidean from empirical evidence. I cannot reconcile it with my ...
0
votes
1answer
87 views

Why point mass leaves it's own gravitational well? [closed]

I suppose that point mass has its own gravitational well. Why this point mass is still attracted by other gravitational waves. I expect that this point mass is surrounded by "gravitational hills". Why ...
0
votes
1answer
98 views

Does physics recognize the particle of light separately from the wave of light? [closed]

To frame this question, we need to assume that time freezes when traveling at the speed of light. This is theoretically congruent with Einstein's theory of relativity and the theory of time dilation, ...
3
votes
2answers
164 views

Can a curvature in time (and not space) cause acceleration?

I realize that the curvature of space-time causes acceleration (gravity). Is it possible to have a curvature only of space, or a curvature only of time? If so, would a curvature only of space, or a ...
4
votes
0answers
60 views

Asymtotically flat spacetime applicable for spacetimes which are not diffeomorphic to $\mathbb{R}^4$

I wanted to investigate changes on a compact 4-manifold $M$. More specifically it is the K3-surface. I follow a paper by Asselmeyer-Maluga from 2012. The idea there was to make sure that the manifold ...
0
votes
2answers
263 views

What is space made of?

General Relativity posits that matter curves spacetime, such that geodesics point towards the object in question, hence, gravity. Now, how does matter do this? What is spacetime "made of", anyway, ...
4
votes
1answer
135 views

Non-stationary spacetime

What is an example for a spacetime that is non-stationary that is considered as a description of something in nature? So far all the spacetimes I encounted have always been stationary ...
4
votes
3answers
184 views

What exactly is charge? [duplicate]

If gravity is really the bending of space/time causing objects with mass to experience acceleration, is there a similar physical meaning to 'charge' besides 'a property of matter which causes it to ...
2
votes
1answer
67 views

Does negative energy density (i.e. weak energy condition violation) create closed timelike curves?

I remember reading something about Stephen Hawking denying the fact you can't make CTC's (Closed Timelike Curves) without weak energy condition violation. If this is true, where do the light cones ...
0
votes
1answer
63 views

Observation of light bending spacetime [duplicate]

Has radiation or energy bending spacetime ever been observed? If not, is it likely that it ever will, assuming current technology? Note: This is not a question of space bending light, but of light ...
3
votes
1answer
95 views

Is the concept of space-time curvature a recursive one? [duplicate]

A way some people explain (or try to explain) how gravity works is using space-time curvature: an object with high mass distorts the surrounding space-time plane like a bowling ball distorts a sheet ...
0
votes
2answers
153 views

Does gravity actually contract space-time?

In the Big Crunch Theory it says that gravity (curvature in space-time) will stop the universe's expansion and gravity will cause the universe to contract on itself. My question is if gravity is a ...
4
votes
2answers
286 views

What does it mean to “convert energy into time”?

In a recent article about creating electron-positron pairs by colliding photons in a laboratory, Andrei Seryi, director of the John Adams Institute at Oxford University, was quoted to said: It's ...
1
vote
1answer
73 views

Knots and singularities

Can space-time singularities be treated as mathematical knots occurring in dimensions greater than four? I just drew an analogy with knots in one-dimensional strings. When a rubber-band is looped over ...
0
votes
2answers
74 views

Understanding emergent phenomena in the block universe. (Reworded question)

Each person exists as an unchanging 4D worldtube in the block universe. At each slice of the worldtube there is a present, past and future. However, there is a black box* which appears to exist in ...
23
votes
3answers
2k views

Why is spacetime curved by mass but not charge?

It is written everywhere that gravity is curvature of spacetime caused by the mass of the objects or something to the same effect. This raises a question with me: why isn't spacetime curved due to ...
5
votes
1answer
211 views

Why is $S^1\times\mathbb{R}^{n-1}$ the topology of $AdS_n$?

Anti-de Sitter $AdS_n$ may be defined by the quadric $$-(x^0)^2-(x^1)^2+\vec{x}^2=-\alpha^2\tag{1}$$ embedded in ${\mathbb{R}^{2,n-1}}$, where I write ${\vec{x}^2}$ as the squared norm ${|\vec{x}|^2}$ ...
6
votes
4answers
968 views

How to measure the curvature of the space-time?

I know G.R. change our vision of space and time as a unique surface than can bend. We can associate the curvature of the space-time as the gravity created by the mass of planets, stars... But how can ...
2
votes
2answers
178 views

What is the meaning of space-time curvature?

What is the difference between the Space-time curvature and Space curvature?
0
votes
0answers
77 views

Does non-matter energy curve spacetime? [duplicate]

I know that matter (mass) curves spacetime, but do other forms of energy do the same? I.e. is matter the only form of energy that curves spacetime?
1
vote
2answers
81 views

What are the factors affecting the spacetime curvature?

Large masses in space as stars and planets cause a curvature in the spacetime fabric. What are the factors that affect this curvature? Is it only mass? And can we conclude these factors using Tensors? ...
1
vote
0answers
42 views

Space time curvature due to electric charge or magnetic charges [duplicate]

since we know that gravitational force is nothing but a curvature in space-time. I have a similar analogous for the electric or magnetic charges. Similarity is that both electromagnetic and ...
0
votes
2answers
201 views

Does the stretching of space time have a limit?

Why does the stretching of spacetime have no limit? If multiple universes exist. Wouldn't each universe occupy a defined area? If these universes do occupy a defined area wouldn't there be a limit to ...
58
votes
4answers
8k views

Why would spacetime curvature cause gravity?

It is fine to say that for an object flying past a massive object, the spacetime is curved by the massive object, and so the object flying past follows the curved path of the geodesic, so it "appears" ...
5
votes
5answers
1k views

Naive visualization of space-time curvature

With only a limited knowledge of general relativity, I usually explain space-time curvature (to myself and others) thus: "If you throw a ball, it will move along a parabola. Initially its vertical ...
0
votes
1answer
155 views

General relativity, gravity and spacetime curvature [duplicate]

There is a very fundamental flaw in the common explanation given of the space-time curvature due to massive objects. It is said that a massive object curves space time just like a bowling ball on a ...
2
votes
1answer
88 views

Regarding the possibility of Closed Timelike Curves

I've been looking a lot at Closed Timelike Curves, and how if a theory allows for these curves it doesn't respect causality. I understand that about the curves themselves (Grandfather Paradox), but ...
0
votes
4answers
157 views

How to determine “timelike”-ness without using a coordinate system?

It has been stated here that: we can say, without introducing a coordinate system, that the interval associated with two events is timelike, lightlike, or spacelike. This assertion appears at ...
2
votes
2answers
735 views

Can Flow of time become still?

According to theory of time dilation, flow of time slows down significantly at the speed of light.Is there any conditions practically or theoretically when flow of time is reduced to zero means it ...
10
votes
1answer
327 views

How to prove that a spacetime is maximally symmetric?

In Carroll's book on general relativity, I found the following remark: In two dimensions, finding that $R$ is a constant suffices to prove that the space is maximally symmetric [...] In higher ...
8
votes
2answers
993 views

Does space curvature automatically imply extra dimensions?

Total newbie with basically no physics knowledge here :) I would welcome any correction to the steps of my reasoning that lead to my question, which could easily turn out to be invalid :) My current ...
0
votes
1answer
219 views

Why does the Alcubierre drive require negative energy?

The Alcubierre drive is an idea for a faster-than-light spaceship. It works by contracting space-time in front of the ship, and expanding it behind the ship. Physicists say that this requires the use ...
2
votes
6answers
313 views

Curvature of Spacetime

I have been exploring for some time both the Special and General Relativity, hoping to glean at least a conceptual grasp of their basic tenets. In reading the book "Gravitation" by Misner, Thorne and ...
2
votes
0answers
82 views

Why is the mass of a Kerr black hole proportional to it's angular momentum?

I'm a third year mathematics undergrad, and have just started the module General Relativity and spacetime geometry, I also have a keen interest in black holes. However I would like to know why and ...
0
votes
0answers
81 views

Light cones and reference frames

I'd like to know what does it mean exactly to find a reference frame in which two events occur at the same time or in the same space coordinates. As I picture it if we have two events A and B in a (x, ...
1
vote
1answer
198 views

Questions about MTW's “thousand” tests of the Einstein principle

In Misner, Thorne, Wheeler (henceforth written as "MTW"), "Gravitation", Box 16.4, there's an experimental setup construction (or method) presented by which "Each geodesic clock is constructed and ...
1
vote
0answers
69 views

The time dilation in an oscillating elevator

Suppose you are in an elevator which oscillates vertically with a frequency $\nu$. How will we find the time dilation in this oscillating reference frame ? If the lift is accelerating upward or ...
0
votes
0answers
80 views

What is the physical meaning of the Eddington - Finkelstein metric?

I want to see a some physical process (experimental) that could explain the many transformations of coordinates into this mathematical procedure. (really two transformations, but i think that is a ...
0
votes
0answers
53 views

General relativity and global aspects [duplicate]

The theory of general relativity tells me something about the global structure of space-time, eg simply connected ?
1
vote
1answer
96 views

Best way to check for anisotropy given a metric tensor

Carroll gives the definition of isotropy at a point as given vector $V$ and $W$ in $T_{p}M$, there is some isometry that can push $V$ forward such that it ends up parallel to $W$. I understand what ...