Solid-state physics studies how macroscopic properties of solids (mechanical, electrical, optical, etc.) result from their microscopic structure. It usually deals with the scale where quantum properties of the particles are substantial.

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Is it possible to study solid state from kittel after taking only one course in quantum mechanics? [closed]

I have taken only QM I, which is the 1st half of Griffiths including the chapter on identical particles, will that be enough to understand Kittel's solid state? Should one have also taken a course ...
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Proof of existence of lowest temperature $0 K$

Im mathematics there is a concept of infinity meaning that whenever you pick a number and say that it is the smallest/Largest there is a way to further reduce/increase that number by ...
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Qualitative argument to determine energy of defects

In a book of "LES HOUCHES - Critical Phenomena, Random systems, Gauge theories" the author Frolich says that: 2D In two dimensions, the mean energy of an isolated point defect in a square area of ...
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What is the difference between contact-limited and space-charge-limited charge transport?

I am reading a paper ("Tunable Electrical Conductivity of Individual Graphene Oxide Sheets Reduced at 'Low' Temperatures," Jung, et al. Nano Lett. 2008, 8, 4283-4287) about electrical conductivity in ...
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316 views

What is the time correlation function in the Green-Kubo formulation of ionic current?

I am reading a paper, and I came across the Green-Kubo formulation, where the conductivity $\sigma$ of charged particles is related to the time correlation function of the $z$-component of the ...
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The Difference between Thomas-Fermi Screening and Lindhard Screening

Assuming the general theory of screening related to electron-electron interactions, I was wondering if anyone could provide a clear, yet conceptually complete explanation of the differences between ...
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840 views

Partially filled orbitals and strongly correlated electrons

Interesting behavior of strong correlation between electrons occur in metals with partially filled d or f orbitals (transition metals). Why these strong correlations do not appear with elements with ...
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Why is glass a good conductor of heat?

AFAIK Glass is insulator, it doesn't have free electron. It's said metal is a good conductor of heat because it has free electron, glass doesn't have free electron, why it is a good conductor of heat? ...
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888 views

Tight Binding Model in Graphene

I'm following a calculation done by a guy who's done it a bit different than what I've done before (used nearest neighbour vectors and a DFT instead of what I will show below), I'm not quite sure how ...
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Basic Question - Green's Functions in Quantum Mechanics

I am trying to learn about Green's functions as part of my graduate studies and have a rather basic question about them: In my maths textbooks and a lot of places online, the basic Greens function G ...
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467 views

Energy band diagram of a system of Silicon Quantum dots

Suppose that we have a system of Silicon nanoparticles embedded in ZnO dielectric matrix. i'm thinking about how to construct the energy band structure of this system , suppose that we already have ...
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293 views

A question about definition of Fermi energy

Wikipedia states the definition of Fermi energy as for "a system of non-interacting fermions". If we have to assume free electrons in a solid behave this way before we are able to calculate Fermi ...
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780 views

How is contact resistivity defined for a Schottky contact, or the Schottky barrier height for an ohmic contact?

Based on the transfer length method (TLM), one can accurately calculate the contact resistivity for an ohmic contact, by evaluating the absolute resistance measured through the test structure and ...
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What are the specific electronic properties that make an atom ferromagnetic versus simply paramagnetic?

As I understand it, paramagnetism is similar in its short-term effect to ferromagnetism (spins of the electrons line up with the magnetic field, etc.), though apparently the effect is weaker. What is ...
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Are all metals good conductor of electricity?

I am writing an article for kids, which is on conductors and insulators of electricity. If I make a statement that "All metals are electrical conductors and all non-metals are electrical insulators" ...
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809 views

Mathematical rigorous introduction to solid state physics

I am looking for a good mathematical rigorous introduction to solid state physics. The style and level for this solid state physics book should be comparable to Abraham Marsdens Foundations of ...
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681 views

Van Hove Singularity at Saddle Point

this is another one of those examples where textbooks always just gloss over it with the remark that it "can be done" and then just state the result: I want to compute the general form of a van Hove ...
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685 views

Can surface dipoles/charges change the work function of a metal?

As typically drawn in simplified band diagrams (see picture below), the metal Fermi Level is shown as the top of the conduction band, with the entire band filled. In many situations, including ...
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What are Low-lying energy levels?

I am reading about some canonical transformations of the Hamiltonian (of a system consisting of an electron interacting with an ionic lattice) due to Tomanaga and Lee, Low and Pines. One of the ...
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Why electrons are relativistic in Graphene and non relativistic in vacuum?

If a free region in space has a potential difference of one volt, an electron in this region will acquire kinetic energy of 1 eV. Its speed will be much smaller than the speed of light hence it will ...
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147 views

Working with atomic (?) units in solid state physics

I'm having some troubles understanding the units used in solid state physics paper. In the paper I read $\Lambda a \sim 1$ where $\Lambda$ is a momentum cutoff and $a$ is the lattice spacing of a ...
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269 views

Electron Fermi gas

My question is about 2-dimensional Fermi gas of electrons. What is magnetic susceptibility when $T<<T_F$ (where $T_F$ is Fermi Temperature) and, What is the ratio between Pauli and Curie ...
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609 views

Yet another question on the Lindhard function

Here's another question concerning the Lindhard function as used in the physical description of metals. First we define the general Lindhard function in the Random Phase approximation as ...
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278 views

Question concerning the Lindhard function

I'm having a question concerning the Lindhard function. The reference I'm using is the standard text "Quantum Theory of Solids" by Charles Kittel. I'm concerned with Chapter 6, subchapter "Method of ...
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Nonlinear absorption coefficient and the band gap

How does the nonlinear absorption coefficient depend on the band gap? How can that coefficient be calculated theoretically? (Preferably with an example)
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683 views

Possibility of Bose-Einstein condensation in low dimensions

I remember having a problem (for practice preliminary exams at UC Berkeley) to prove that Bose-Einstein condensation(BEC) is not possible in two dimensions (as opposed to three dimensions): For ...
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What happens to a Luttinger liquid under time reversal?

Suppose you a have an ordinary Luttinger liquid with $$ H = \int dx \sum _{\eta= \pm 1 , \sigma =\uparrow,\downarrow } \psi^\dagger_{\eta, \sigma} (x) (-i v \eta \partial _x) \psi _{\eta,\sigma} (x). ...
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What are “electron holes” in semiconductors?

I'm tutoring senior high school students. So far I've explained them the concepts of atomic structure (Bohr's model & Quantum mechanical model) very clearly. Now the next topic to be taught is ...
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377 views

4 digit Miller Index for a cubic structure?

As the title states, can a Miller index for a cubic structure have 4 digits? If I have a structure with intercepts (2,8,3) on the x-y-z axes respectively, the following Miller index would be (12,3,8), ...
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439 views

How does thermal broadening of the Fermi Function cause electron coherence loss?

Generally, there are two ways for electrons to lose their wave-like properties in a solid material. One is by way of collisions that cause changes in the energy and momentum of the electron. The other ...
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Indirect band gap semiconductor for LEDs?

Can someone please explain why Indirect band gap semiconductor can not be used for LED creation. Can you also please give me some reference link for details.
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How to calculate 2D soft-body Physics [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: 2d soft body physics mathematics The definition of rigid body in Box2d is A chunk of matter that is so strong that the distance between any two bits of matter on ...
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534 views

Why does the density of states in a solid scale as $\sqrt{E}$?

In three dimensions, the density of states of a free electron is the square root of the energy of the electron. Can somebody explain the relationship between this dependence and the shape/formation of ...
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References for the source and application of bonding-antibonding splitting on electronic structure?

I am currently doing research on semiconductor materials, so I need a very strong background in band theory to understand the literature. I am currently trying to understand the relationship between ...
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883 views

Propagation of light in transparent media: absorption and reemission or scattering?

In the two Phys.SE questions What is the mechanism behind the slowdown of light/photons in a transparent medium? and Why glass is transparent? transparent media were discussed. But I'd like to clarify ...
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Importance of Kohn anomaly? [closed]

What is practical importance of Kohn anomaly for experimentalists and/or theorists?
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203 views

Fourier analysis in crystallography

What is the best reference for an introduction to the use of Fourier analysis in crystallography?
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295 views

Lorentz invariance of a frequency- and wavelength- dependent dielectric tensor

Suppose we have a material described by a dielectric tensor $\bar{\epsilon}$. In frequency domain, this tensor depends on the wave frequency $\omega$ and the wave vector $\vec{k}$. Clearly not all ...
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Any interesting physics theroies/equations to be used in a video game? [closed]

I am designing a little game based on Newtons Graviational Law. Are there any theories that I can use to create games? thanks
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Repulsive classical identical particles on a square lattice

I am not sure whether it is some well-known named model in statistical physics. I could not find it in any standard text-book that I know of. Let there be $N$ identical classical particles ...
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361 views

About symmetry, and about electron density in crystals in particular

The book Introduction to Solid State Physics by Kittel says: "We have seen that a crystal is invariant under any translation of the form T [...]. Any local physical property of the crystal, such as ...
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Number density of LO and LA phonons as a function of temperature?

I'd like to know the how the number density of longitudinal optical (LO) and longitudinal acoustic (LA) phonons varies as a function of temperature of the material. Is there a simple expression for ...
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How can the Hall effect ever show positive charge carriers?

The Hall effect can be used to determine the sign of the charge carriers, as a positive particle drifting along the wire and a negative particle drifting the other direction get deflected the same (as ...
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What does plasmon look like in 3D band structure graph?

Consider metal, and its reciprocal lattice representation with Fermi surface. What is the correct way to represent a plasmon in this system? M.b. rotating points on the surface? Or 3d membrane-like ...
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684 views

bandgaps for 2D square lattice with potential of the form V=V(x) + V(y) - what are the general properties?

Let us consider Bloch wave function solutions for a particle confined to a 2D square lattice with a potential of the form $V=V(x) + V(y)$ (that is, one that can be factorized). In this case we can ...
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how to find the effective mass of a hole

how can we find out the effective mass of a hole,since a hole in the valence band is just an absence of electron?
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Evaluation of band gap from transmittance

How can I evaluate the band gap of my ZnO thin film. Thickness=d=80 nm I’m aware of alpha=-1/d*log(T) But I can’t fit a line to my data. And: How can I smoothen my data on about 346 nm? Do you have ...
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745 views

When is use of the 'effective mass' concept appropriate?

In textbooks the characteristic length scale of an exciton, or an electron bound to dopant atom, in silicon is calculated by analogy to the vacuum case. Bohr radius in vacuum: $$a_0 = \frac{4 \pi ...
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230 views

Mobile “muonic hydrogen”

If we look at the atomic positions in a single crystal sample with a diamond like lattice, there exist directions along which there are long hexagonal "tubes" (I'm not sure if these have a proper ...
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Madelung constant list (for surfaces as well)

Searching for this on google proved to be quite tedious, but I reckon that someone working with crystals a lot might know this off the top of his head: Is there a good source that lists the Madelung ...