Solid-state physics studies how macroscopic properties of solids (mechanical, electrical, optical, etc.) result from their microscopic structure. It usually deals with the scale where quantum properties of the particles are substantial.

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How to interpret band structures

I'm currently taking a Solid State Physics class, and is currently reading about the quantum mechanical description of solids. I then came across the following figure: It's supposed to be the band ...
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999 views

Partition Function for Two Level System

I have a system with $N_s$ sites and $N$ particles, such that $N_s >> N >> 1$. If a site has no particle, then there is zero energy associated with that site. The $N$ particles occupy the ...
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Why do excitonic absorptions have small bandwidth?

Below is an image of the optical density (proportional to the absorption coefficient) of KBr crystal at low temperature. Indicated at 6.6 ev and 7.7 eV are the absorption by excitons. As you can see, ...
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578 views

Derivation of Matrix Components of Hamiltonian in Tight Binding Method

Im currently struggling with the description of the tight binding method in the original paper by Slater and Koster from 1954 (where a free version of the paper can be found under this link). In ...
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3k views

Geometric Structure Factor for Monatomic FCC lattice

I am trying to find the geometric structure factor and my work here is clearly wrong. I will put my wrong answer and then I will throw up the link to wikipedia for the correct answer, because I cannot ...
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260 views

A few questions about the Fermi Level/Energy

My first question is, how is the Fermi Energy for a material actually determined? I know this derivation, but it seems to say that the Fermi Energy is just based on the electron density (and maybe ...
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610 views

valence bands in graphene

In Graphene, each carbon use 3 electrons to form sp2 bonding with neighboring, and in a unit cell, there are 2 carbon atoms, so at least these 6 electrons contribute to 6 valence bands. Then my ...
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119 views

Is this 2D structure triclinic?

The only rotation axis obvious to me is rotation by 360 degrees, the identity. Vertical mirror planes I've been dicing and cutting it through several planes and I still see none. Yet, the structure ...
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680 views

Dopant concentration and changes in band gap energy

Thanks to this lovely website, I was able to pop out reasonable values for my band gap energies from a translucent material. As expected, I found a decrease in band gap energy due to my treatments. ...
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986 views

I can't figure out crystal planes with negative intercepts

As seen above, I don't follow how you figure out those planes. It seems they're not using the origin labeled. I'm not really sure I understand spatially what's going on in the left figure so let's ...
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186 views

Electric current streamlines in induction cooking vessel

I am looking for a plot of the typical streamlines of the electric induced currents ("eddy currents") in a induction cooking vessel. How can one theoretically predict the streamlines? How is it ...
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106 views

Estimate the difference between two sets of atoms

I've been working on amorphous structures derived from a crystalline one (using MD) containing $N$ atoms. I want to prove that these structures are different and to quantify their "differentness". One ...
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230 views

Dispersion relation in continuum mechanics

I'm looking at the vibration of a solid having a lattice structure, they obey the following equation: $$\rho\partial_t^2u_i = C_{ijkl}\nabla_j\nabla_ku_{l}$$ with $u(\vec{x},t)$ the displacement to ...
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130 views

How creation of point defects in semiconductors is affected by strain?

When the effect of the strain on solids is discussed, normally the explanation is the following: increasing stress, first point defects created, then dislocations, then plastic deformation starts, ...
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119 views

What is Z3 exciton?

I am searching and studying excitons and I confronted with a term named Z3 exciton. What is it? And what is its difference with, for instance Z1 or Z2 exciton?
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240 views

Inhomogeneous Effective Mass in a 2D Lattice

Consider a tight-binding square lattice in 2D. This lattice has two different nearest neighbor tunneling rates along the x and y directions; call them $J_{x}$ and $J_{y}$. All longer range tunneling ...
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340 views

A question about definition of Fermi energy

Wikipedia states the definition of Fermi energy as for "a system of non-interacting fermions". If we have to assume free electrons in a solid behave this way before we are able to calculate Fermi ...
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Van Hove Singularity at Saddle Point

this is another one of those examples where textbooks always just gloss over it with the remark that it "can be done" and then just state the result: I want to compute the general form of a van Hove ...
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245 views

Fourier analysis in crystallography

What is the best reference for an introduction to the use of Fourier analysis in crystallography?
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Effective mass in Aluminium lattice?

How do we calculate the effective mass of an electron in an Aluminium lattice? Is there any simple analytical way to work it out?
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Definition of luminescence

I saw a definition of luminescence as "any light not resulting from blackbody radiation", but in my view it's too broad. Is an accelerating electron producing luminescence? Or an electron recombining ...
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Perturbation theory in second quantization

I am dealing with electron/phonon interaction in QM. In particular, given the Hamiltonian of a solid, $$H=H_{el}+H_{ion}+H_{el-ion}$$ we have that the el-phonon Hamiltonian is treatened ...
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63 views

About the definition of the spin current

People have been talking about the spin current for a while. But there is a fundamental problem. Unlike charge, or mass, spin is not conserved. Let us take the 1d spin-1/2 Heisenberg chain as an ...
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DOS integral when surface is not closed

According to the density of states (DOS) formula $$\rho(\varepsilon)\propto \int_{\varepsilon=\text{const}}\frac{dS}{|\nabla_k \varepsilon_k|}$$ Since there is an integral on the constant energy ...
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Interpretation of the diode constant in a LED

For a real diode the current as function of the potential difference between its terminals (for big enough voltage) is given by: $$I=A e^{\frac{eV-E}{\eta k_B T}} \tag{1}$$ So in the case of LEDs ...
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Spectroscopy from a classical light wave or photon only?

In chemistry we mostly regard light/electromagnetic radiation as a beam of particles or photons. This is a very useful model to explain molecular excitations and ionisations from quantum interactions. ...
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Energy levels in molecules

I apologize in advance if this turns out to be a duplicate question. As far as I can understand, if you bring two or more atoms together their wave functions begin to interfere and, since there ...
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Is the photon truly not absorbed in Raman scattering?

In reading about Raman Scattering, I was thinking while reading it "okay, incident photo absorbed by molecule, molecule goes to higher energy vibrational state, molecule re-emits photon with either ...
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Is molecular vibration just phonon modes for a single molecule?

I'm reading about Raman Scattering, of which a big part is measuring the energy lost to/gained from Molecular Vibrations. I wasn't totally clear on exactly what is "vibrating" in vibrational modes (is ...
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Where does an LED use energy other than emitting light?

I have a quantum formula describing what kind of photon should be emitted by an LED depending on its voltage. Of course the colour is depending on the material, but every type of LED also needs its ...
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166 views

Software to calculate and visualize reciprocal lattice

I am currently preparing XRD experiments for an epitaxial thin film on a silicon wafer. I am looking for software (Win oder Mac) to calculate the reciprocal lattice from the cell parameters and ...
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How can I calculate the character table for double group in spin-orbit interaction

When I read the book(Group theory: application to condensed matter physics) page 347, I found I don't know how to derive the new irreducible representations in the double group.
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60 views

Are the 14 Bravais lattices really distinct?

I have learned that there are 14 distinct Bravais lattices in 3D and any other thought lattice form could be reduced to or expressed in one of these 14 forms. But the primitive unit cell for f.c.c ...
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29 views

What material could be used to study magnetic phase transitions in a college laboratory exercise?

I am working to develop a simple laboratory exercise in solid state physics to be conducted by fourth year students of physics. The idea of the exercise is for the student to get some experience in ...
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54 views

Why does Pressure Increase the Tc (Critical Temperature) of a Superconductor?

Just a heads up - please make this answer understandable to around 1st year degree level physics - not PhD research. So I can understand it - thanks. I was wondering why they Critical Temperature ...
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Why do electrons form Cooper pairs below certain temperature? [duplicate]

Just a heads up - please make this answer understandable to around 1st year degree level physics - not PhD research. So I can understand it - thanks. 1) In solid state physics, why is it that below a ...
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How to compute matsubara frequency summation over computer?

Matsubara frequency sum usually takes the following form: $S_\eta = \frac{1}{\beta}\sum_{i\omega_n} g(i\omega_n).$ But in my problem, $g(i\omega_n)$ is a lengthy expression, which can not be ...
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Potential Energy in solids: Why are different equations used for deriving lattice constants and for deriving the properties of phonons?

While deriving the equilibrium lattice constants we use expressions for potential like Lennard-Jones potential which have 6th and 12th order terms or Madelung energy for ionic crystals. While ...
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Thermal healing of defects in crystals

Thermal treatment can heal point defects due to the diffusion of atoms towards empty points. In a solid crystal structure, atoms do not diffuse at room temperature (correct?) Energy of thermal ...
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Does a conducting wire give off measurable radiation?

In the Drude model (semiclassical, but should still apply here I think), the conducting electrons are in a constant electric field, and, in between collisions with the lattice ions (that happen, on ...
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Does the real part of the inverse dielectric function have to be negative at some point for Cooper pairs to form?

Electrons naturally repel one another. However, in a superconductor, a phonon-mediated interaction causes the electrons to have a weak attractive interaction. Suppose that the interaction between two ...
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Problem with derivation of phonons in crystal

In this derivation of phonon solutions, everywhere, we are forcefully assuming the wavelike characteristics along the length of the chain. While all we can deduce for finding out the fundamental ...
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In k$\cdot$p theory, how does one calculate the bulk inversion asymmetry coefficients given in table 6.3 in Winkler?

In k$\cdot$p theory, how does one calculate the bulk inversion asymmetry coefficients given in table 6.3 in Winkler? Winkler's book on spin-orbit coupling effects is available free online. In ...
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297 views

What is the Fermi energy of (undoped) graphene?

All of the sources I have found for this online have been wildly unclear. Many use the phrase "Fermi energy" to refer to the "Fermi level" (which is emphatically not what I'm looking for; I want the ...
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Force constant of metals - Kohn anomaly

In Introduction to Solid State Physics (Kittel), it assumed the force constant between plane $s$ and $s+p$ $C_p=A\frac{\sin pk_0a}{pa}$ in metals to represent a Kohn anomaly. It says such a form is ...
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108 views

Out-of-Plane Phonons

I am trying to derive the out-of-plane phonon dispersion relation for a membrane. As far as I can tell, one of the simplest ways to do so is with a Lagrangian of the form: ...
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161 views

Pseudocubic unit cells: how to construct one?

I keep coming across the term pseudocubic unit cell while reading about orthorhombic perovskite structures. No clear explanation ...
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68 views

Uncertainty principle characterizing metallic bonding?

So I was trying to think through the statement that the uncertainty principle can characterize metallic bonding. I know that the uncertainty principle is: $\Delta p \Delta x = \frac{\hbar}{2}$. And ...
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Does the Fermi sea have plane waves, or wave packets?

Consider a zero-temperature, one-dimensional crystal with allowed electron momenta $k_n = \frac{2\pi n}{L}$. Question: Which is the more correct way to think about the Fermi sea? Sharp plane ...
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Derivation of existence of energy band gap in semiconductor (solid State)

I am looking for both a mathematical and a physical reason for energy band gap in metals. For Physical reason, I was told that at each reciprocal lattice, you could have Bragg scattering, that would ...