Solid-state physics studies how macroscopic properties of solids (mechanical, electrical, optical, etc.) result from their microscopic structure. It usually deals with the scale where quantum properties of the particles are substantial.

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Why is Graphene So Strong?

There has been a lot of news about Graphene since its discovery in 2004. And as we are all told it is a revolutionary material which is very strong, conductive and transparent. But what is it about ...
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104 views

Semiconductors and energy bands

The valence and conduction band of a semi-conductor are often drawn as here click. This plot has essentially two features and I would like to understand them. The peak and the valley of the two ...
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985 views

What's the difference between hopping and tunneling?

My professor made a distinction between electron hopping (the closest wikipedia had an article on) and tunneling, saying that one (he didn't say which, but I assume hopping) was temperature dependent ...
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722 views

What does “optical conductivity” mean?

Does it just mean "AC electric conductivity"? If so, why have a special name for it, and why mention optical specifically? The wikipedia page on it is very sparse. This (warning, PDF) document just ...
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1k views

Question about the quantization of lattice vibration (phonons)

In my syllabus about solid state physics they state that lattice vibration is quantized, analogous to the harmonic oscillator: $$E = (n+\frac{1}{2})\hbar\omega$$ So the lattice vibration has ...
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339 views

Electric field and capacitance across a resistor

Using a simple lattice model of conduction, where electrons are accelerated by an electric field, and are slowed down by bumping into the lattice, you get the following equation for current density: ...
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50 views

Origin of interaction in inelastic neutron scatting

In solid state physics, inelastic neutron scattering is a commonly-used experimental technique for probing the energy spectrum of phonon and magnon excitations. This technique relies on the ...
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336 views

What is the difference between contact-limited and space-charge-limited charge transport?

I am reading a paper ("Tunable Electrical Conductivity of Individual Graphene Oxide Sheets Reduced at 'Low' Temperatures," Jung, et al. Nano Lett. 2008, 8, 4283-4287) about electrical conductivity in ...
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516 views

Nature of tetragonal distortion in Jahn-Teller effect

I am wondering: If I have a regular octahedron as my starting point, oriented along the x-y-z axis, and now Jahn-Teller suggest I elongate or compress along the $z$-axis, what happens along the other ...
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25 views

Honeycomb Bravais Lattice with Basis

I just had my second solid state physics lecture and we were talking about bravais lattices. As far as I understand a Bravais lattice is an infinite network of points that looks the same from each ...
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47 views

Free electron Gas shortcomings

I am studying surface states and the Rashba effect. A common model I keep coming across is to implement the free electron model. In this model we get the spin orbit interaction Hamiltonian by ...
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41 views

What does a bucked honeycomb lattice mean?

I was going through some literature where they have mention about bucked honeycomb lattice, but I was unable to understand about the bucked honeycomb term.
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72 views

What happens to the electron density in a metal during an electric discharge?

Suppose we are able to see into a grain of metal at the boundary between the grain and air (perhaps along one of the faces of this cube): (Source: Wikimedia Commons.) This image does not show the ...
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46 views

Symmetry in program for ewald summation

The formula for Ewald summation as given in Allen and Tildesley - $$ U = U^{(r)} + U^{(k)} + U^{(bc)} + U^{self} $$ where the k-space contribution of potential is given by $$ U^{(k)} = \frac{1}{\pi ...
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206 views

Why according to Hund's first rule all electron with same spin should occupy orbitals when partially filling?

I get that because of coulomb repulsion initially all the electrons will not occupy the same site but will single occupy the orbitals.But while doing so how do they know to keep their spins aligned ...
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533 views

What does $m^*>m_e$ imply? (the effective mass of electron is larger than its rest mass)

From what I understand, the concept of effective mass is just something people come up with to make electrons and holes obey the equation of motion $$ \vec{F}=m^* \vec{a} $$ without dealing with the ...
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106 views

Periodic momentum space in band structure

I often see pictures like this in physics, this one for Silicon band structure. (source, NB: it's the German page for Silicon). There you see the plot of the energy in terms of the momentum $k$. ...
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460 views

Time reversal operator in tight-binding model with second quantization form

In the tight binding model, $H=\sum_{r,r'}ta^{\dagger}_{r}a_{r'}+h.c.$. When conducting a time reversal transformation, what form will this Hamiltonian take? Or how can I express time reversal ...
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1k views

What are hot electrons?

What are they? How are they created? And what do they have to do with plasmons? I searched the web, but I would like more reliable and straightforward sources.
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173 views

Group analysis forbids band-crossing in 1D?

Group analysis forbids band-crossing in 1D in terms of conventional band theory. I read this in a good solid state physics book. But there's no explanation at all. Can anyone help on this?
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440 views

Determining Fourier Coefficients by inspection

I'm beginning to learn about Fourier series/transforms. My teacher hopes that by now we should be able to examine a simple potential function and decompose it without having to actually do the ...
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406 views

Can Rydberg states exist within the bulk of a metal?

I am aware that outer shell electrons in rubidium atoms in an optical lattice can be excited to Rydberg levels, in which the electrons orbit well beyond the atoms to which they are bound. Is this ...
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165 views

From the local Hooke's law to the global one

My system consist of a cylinder with axis Z that can contract and dilate along this axis. It obeys microscopically Hooke's law of elasticity: ...
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51 views

Are there any electro-optic crystals that are also pyroelectric but not birefringent?

As the title says, a crystal that is electr-optic and pyroelectric can it be non-birefrigent?
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170 views

Repulsive classical identical particles on a square lattice

I am not sure whether it is some well-known named model in statistical physics. I could not find it in any standard text-book that I know of. Let there be $N$ identical classical particles ...
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272 views

Experimental samples with rare earth metal

Many experiments, such as optical, superconductivity, etc, use the samples that involve rare earth metals and transition metals. Why are they used that often. Is the main reasons: They have the ...
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42 views

Semiconductors, Solid-State Physics

We know, that conductors, conduct because their valence energy band is "half" full, and k ("wave vector") can increase and therefore the electrons under the influence of a electric field can "move", ...
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314 views

Many Body Physics: Hamiltonian block structure and Symmetries

Consider a many body problem of a small cluster, e.g. the 'Hubbard-Cluster' (albeit the question may be of relevance for other Hamiltonians as well): $$\mathcal{H}=\sum_{<ij>\sigma} t_{ij} ...
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219 views

Is the photon truly not absorbed in Raman scattering?

In reading about Raman Scattering, I was thinking while reading it "okay, incident photo absorbed by molecule, molecule goes to higher energy vibrational state, molecule re-emits photon with either ...
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74 views

Intuition for the density of states of the free electron gas model

The density of states as a function of energy for a free electron gas (inside some solid-thing where the electrons are modeled due to the free elecetron gas model) is in: 1D: D(E) ~ $\sqrt[-1/2]{E}$ ...
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390 views

Why is Bose-Einstein condensation a phase transition?

Bosons may succumb to a Bose-Einstein condensation at a certain critical temperature $T_c$, thus entering the BEC phase. The only thing I know about the BEC is that since we are talking about bosons ...
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39 views

Why do we still get sharp scattering spots with quasi-crystal?

In a quasi-crystal, there is no translational invariance. This means there is no delta-function in the Fourier transform. But to get a sharp scattering spot, we need a delta function. Physically, ...
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180 views

Statistical Mechanics - Distribution of Energies

Consider a state space $\mathbb{X}$. The probability density function under a canonical ensemble is given by the Boltzmann distribution $$\pi_{\mathbb{X}}(x)=\frac{e^{-\beta ...
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161 views

Possibility of stable muonic structures?

In an analogy to the neutron, which decays rapidly as a free particle, but when bound in a nucleus it is stable, would it be possible to crease a structure that permits the stability of muons - be it ...
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377 views

What determines Phonon - Phonon collisions?

I was in Solid State Physics lecture yesterday and we BRIEFLY went over what causes phonons to collide with one another. Things such as crystal imperfections, boundaries, Temperature, but I was ...
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88 views

Forward-scattering for a single impurity in an infinite system

I'm slightly confused with the following situation: Suppose you have an electron in a tight-binding model, and let's say we are in one dimension with $N$ lattice sites. Add to this a single ...
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279 views

Algorithm for identifying planes in a Bravais Lattice

I have a lattice with Lattice Vectors $(\vec{t}_1,\vec{t}_2,\vec{t}_3)$ which are NOT orthogonal in general. How can I identify the atoms/unit cells that belong to a plane - that is normal to a given ...
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Crystal visualization software for visualizing lattice with reciprocal vectors drawn in same image [closed]

I'm looking for a free crystal visualization program, preferably for Linux, that can visualize the common lattice structures in 3D interactively (rotatable with mouse) and draw in the same picture the ...
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690 views

Thomas-Fermi approximation and the dielectric function (+ small bit on graphene)

1) With the dielectric function, which is a function of wavenumber and frequency,how is it possible to take the limit of either to zero without changing the other one? I thought that frequency and ...
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149 views

Inelastic Scattering and coherent scatterng

Another Scattering Question So I have this Bravais Lattice of sites R vibrating with some normal mode with a small displacement amplitude $u_o$, some wave vector k and some frequency $\omega$. We can ...
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746 views

The Hendriks-Teller Model

So I am working on understanding the Hendriks-Teller model of 1D disorder. So the way I understand it is the following. You have a random smattering of particles. Each mass is separated by some unit ...
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115 views

What is the energy in eV between atoms in a typical solid state material?

Comps 2 question: What is the energy in eV between atoms in a typical solid state material ? Just rough estimate ? How is that related to the thermal energy that needs to be supplied in order to ...
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316 views

How are quantum potential wells fabricated?

Potential wells, such as infinite and finite potential well, have been the standard examples in quantum mechanics textbooks for tens of years. They started being only theoretical toy models but as ...
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921 views

What are Low-lying energy levels?

I am reading about some canonical transformations of the Hamiltonian (of a system consisting of an electron interacting with an ionic lattice) due to Tomanaga and Lee, Low and Pines. One of the ...
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333 views

Lorentz invariance of a frequency- and wavelength- dependent dielectric tensor

Suppose we have a material described by a dielectric tensor $\bar{\epsilon}$. In frequency domain, this tensor depends on the wave frequency $\omega$ and the wave vector $\vec{k}$. Clearly not all ...
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835 views

Madelung constant list (for surfaces as well)

Searching for this on google proved to be quite tedious, but I reckon that someone working with crystals a lot might know this off the top of his head: Is there a good source that lists the Madelung ...
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394 views

Scattering of phonons and electrons within solids

I got a question concerning the scattering of phonons and electrons. I read an introductory explanation to this process that is somehow not very satisfactory. It goes like this: Let $\psi_{k}$ and ...
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1answer
34 views

Momentum operator in effective mass approximation

When we calculate the band structure of some solid then we often find that in the bottom of the conduction band the dispersion looks approximately quadratic with some new effective mass: $$E(k) = ...
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Linear Response And path integral

I'm following Wen's book on Quantum field theory, and I'm struggling with section 2.2.1 on linear response and response functions. Specifically I'm unable to reproduce equation 2.2.7 in which the ...
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How to determine the direction of the wave with the wave vector at Gamma point in the Brillouin zone center?

In the Brillouin zone, such as M point in the Brillouin zone of hexagon lattice, we can determine the direction of this wave vector in the real space; however, for Gamma point,I can't determine the ...