Solid-state physics studies how macroscopic properties of solids (mechanical, electrical, optical, etc.) result from their microscopic structure. It usually deals with the scale where quantum properties of the particles are substantial.

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Fermi Energy and the Electric Potential

In an extrinsic semiconductor the electric potential is: $$\phi = \frac{1}{q}(E_{\mathrm{F}} - E_{\mathrm{Fi}})$$ where $E_{\mathrm{F}}$ is the Fermi energy, $E_{\mathrm{Fi}}$ is the intrinsic Fermi ...
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66 views

The origin of contact noise?

I was trying to measure the noise of a device with metal probes. I was not sure whether I should trust the results because I was told contact noise might contribute to some degree. I am a little ...
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33 views

Thermal expansion and conductivity

When thinking about how the lattice constant of silicon can be given up to eight decimal places without a remark for the temperature I realized that, it seems most insulators and semiconductors seem ...
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70 views

Questions on the elementary excitations in the resonating-valence-bond(RVB) states?

It is known that the RVB states can support spin-charge separations and its elementary excitations are spinons and holons. But it seems that there are some different possibilities for the nature of ...
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126 views

Typical time scales for spin dynamics and lattice vibrations in magnetic solids

In a paper from the 1990s ([1]) on magnetovolume effects in ferromagnets, it is written that in most real situations, the moment (or spin) autocorrelation time is much larger than the period for ...
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109 views

Hall effect with similar positive and negative carriers?

The Hall effect includes the transverse (to the flow of current) electric field set up by the charges which accumulate on the edges, to counter the magnetic component of the Lorentz force acting on ...
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69 views

Brillouin Zones in a nanowire

My professor told me something I didn't understand the other day: I was reading a paper on a crystalline nanowire (NW), and in the paper they look at how the band structure changes (from that of the ...
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144 views

How should I think about reciprocal lattice and Miller indices?

When I hear someone talking about a (100) plane or a (111) plane or an (hkl) in general, my first thought is, is the system cubic. The reason I think this is because I tend NOT to think of the planes ...
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165 views

A few questions about the Fermi Level/Energy

My first question is, how is the Fermi Energy for a material actually determined? I know this derivation, but it seems to say that the Fermi Energy is just based on the electron density (and maybe ...
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149 views

Difference between charge density wave and charge distribution

We can always see modulated charge density, the Friedel Oscillation, around an probe charge due to other electrons' response. Can this be called charge density wave (I believe not)? If not, what is ...
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65 views

The boundary between polycrystalline and crystalline

My current understanding of solid crystalline-like materials (please correct me if I'm wrong!) is that it is a continuum in terms of crystallinity, from amorphous (basically no periodicity) to single ...
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89 views

Phase diagram of SO(5) rotor model

It was originally a problem from Professor Eugene Demler's problem set. Consider an SO(5) rotor model: \begin{align}\mathcal{H}=\frac{1}{\chi} ...
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73 views

Is this a correct description of bonding in a metal?

I am reading the paper "Twenty five years of Finnis-Sinclair potentials" by Graeme Ackland, Adrian Sutton, and Vasek Vitek, Philosophical Magazine 2009, 89, 3111-3116. It is a review-type article ...
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330 views

Pauli paramagnetism for electrons with external magnetic field

Apparently it is to be shown that for electrons under an external magnetic field, in the limit as $B\to 0 $ $$ \chi = \frac{dM}{dB} \approx \frac{n\,\mu^{*^2}}{k\,T}\,\frac{f_{1/2}(z)}{f_{3/2}(z)} $$ ...
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92 views

Why does silicon have an indirect gap?

Is there an intuitive explanation as to why silicon has an indirect gap? I have heard that this can explained using pseudopotentials.
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118 views

Crystal momentum and the vector potential

I noticed that the Aharonov–Bohm effect describes a phase factor given by $e^{\frac{i}{\hbar}\int_{\partial\gamma}q A_\mu dx^\mu}$. I also recognize that electrons in a periodic potential gain a phase ...
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93 views

What is Z3 exciton?

I am searching and studying excitons and I confronted with a term named Z3 exciton. What is it? And what is its difference with, for instance Z1 or Z2 exciton?
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118 views

Stiffness tensor

Let's have a stiffness tensor: $$ a^{ijkl}: a^{ijkl} = a^{jikl} = a^{klij} = a^{ijlk}. $$ It has a 21 independent components for an anisotropic body. How does body symmetry (cubic, hexagonal ...
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331 views

Simple model of edge states for a two-dimensional topological insulator

Quantum spin Hall states or, topological insulators are novel states of matter that have insulating bulk and gapless edge states. Are there any simple models that show these features? See e.g. the ...
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409 views

The Hendriks-Teller Model

So I am working on understanding the Hendriks-Teller model of 1D disorder. So the way I understand it is the following. You have a random smattering of particles. Each mass is separated by some unit ...
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149 views

Discrete sum over an exponential with imaginary argument, considering only every second lattice site?

Let's say I sum an exponential function $e^{\imath \left(k-k^{\prime}\right) x_{i}}$ over a chain system where every member of the chain is of the same type, e.g., A-A-A-...-A-A (total of N sites) ...
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147 views

What does plasmon look like in 3D band structure graph?

Consider metal, and its reciprocal lattice representation with Fermi surface. What is the correct way to represent a plasmon in this system? M.b. rotating points on the surface? Or 3d membrane-like ...
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how to find the effective mass of a hole

how can we find out the effective mass of a hole,since a hole in the valence band is just an absence of electron?
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158 views

Is an “infinitely sharp blade” possible?

A staple of science fiction and fantasy is a blade (knife, sword, ...) that cuts through literally any solid object (wood, steel, concrete, skulls, ...) without effort, often even without the need to ...
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3answers
139 views

Why are free electrons free?

This is what I understand so far: in a conductor, the ions have a weak pull on the valence electrons. So when an electric field is applied, the free electrons are able to easily move about. Makes ...
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2answers
530 views

Continuous vs. Discrete Spectra in various materials

I read that the reason solids emit continuous spectra is that they don't have time to let their electrons decay-they are too close together. Given that electrons decay on the order of 100 nanoseconds ...
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How would a diffraction pattern change if the atoms were triangular instead of spheres?

On a related note, what's a good book/source that would answer questions that go very in depth with these kinds of "what if" questions because I am also asked the same if the atoms were long cylinders ...
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37 views

What does (001) Silicon mean?

If someone gives me a thin film of Si, and they tell me it's (001) Si, does that mean that the (001) planes of Si are the ones making up the surface of the film?
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158 views

Dispersion Relation (e vs. k) clarification (crystal momentum or electron momentum)

If we get the dispersion relation from the Fourier transform of the lattice vectors then how do we get electrons information? Specifically, for the $k=0$ point of the graph, does this mean the ...
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1answer
129 views

Accelerated charged particles produce electromagnetic radiation, but holes (the charge carriers) do not. Is this correct?

Holes are treated as particles in solid-state physics, so I've had some trouble with reasoning through this properly.
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1answer
181 views

What would be the basis vectors for this 2D crystal structure?

In the above image, I have a 2D crystal structure. The lattice vectors are described by: a = {-1/2, -Sqrt[3]/2}; b = {1, 0}; and the location of atoms A and B ...
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2answers
60 views

Is this two forms of Hubbard model equivalent?

I have seen two form of Hubbard model, one is: $$H=-t\sum_{<ij>s}c_{is}^\dagger c_{js}+h.c.+U\sum_i(n_{i\uparrow}-1/2)(n_{i\downarrow}-1/2)-\mu\sum_{is}n_{is}$$ The other is a more familiar ...
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1answer
67 views

Band gaps: are they at the centre or at the edge of the Brillouin zone?

Reading about electronic band structures, I came across the following: Band gaps open at the edges of the Brillouin zone (BZ), since that is where the Bragg scattering occurs. I am slightly ...
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120 views

Questions about Statistical Mechanics

For grand partition ensemble, is it true that the introduction of chemical potential allows us to have the sum of number of the particles in each state to be the total number of particles ("On ...
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138 views

Paramagnetism and large N

In a paramagnetic system, we have: $$N = N_\uparrow + N_\downarrow$$. If we have a large system, with $N >> 1$, is it generally okay to assume $N_\uparrow \approx \frac{N}{2}$ and ...
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1answer
111 views

What does the wavevector $\textbf{k}$ mean?

In Ashcroft, Mermin Solid State Physics, Eq. 17.43 is $$ \epsilon(\textbf{k}) = \frac{\hbar^2 k^2}{2m} - e\phi(\textbf{r}) $$ where $\textbf{k}$ is the wavevector and all other symbols have their ...
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171 views

Eigenfunctions in periodic potential

For Hamiltonian $\operatorname H$ and lattice translation operator $\operatorname T$, if $$\operatorname H\psi=E\psi, \qquad \operatorname T\psi=e^{ik\cdot R}\psi,$$ and $$\operatorname ...
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What is the approximate electrical conductivity $\sigma$ of graphene in S/m or S/cm?

I am trying to find an approximate value of the electrical conductivity $\sigma$ of graphene in units of S/m or S/cm. This table on Wikipedia gives $\sigma$ values for a variety of materials ...
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1answer
66 views

n-p-n p-n-p and n-n-n heterostructure for LED

I was studying LED Heterostructures and I found out that my book is always giving reference to p-p-n type heterostructure. So I looked up into another book in order to find other type of ...
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1answer
51 views

Getting nonphysical results when solving for the index of refraction of a slab?

I'm trying to computationally find the refractive indices (real and imaginary) for a thin slab suspended in air (so the only indices to deal with are air and my material's). I've experimentally taken ...
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1answer
38 views

How do you justify neglecting electron-electron interaction in the Drude model?

I'm sure there's some way to justify it. Maybe a screening effect?
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1answer
82 views

Density of states (treating states in continuum)

If we have a particle in a 3D infinite square well box, with length $L$, e.g. an electron in a conduction metal. By solving the Time independent Schrodinger equation, we can get the formula of ...
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1answer
46 views

Fermi surface questions

In order to define the fermi surface we must need to know about the momentum space. But I found a little bit about momentum space. Can you elaborate it pleaese? what is the meaning of the line ...
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1answer
103 views

Electric field and capacitance across a resistor

Using a simple lattice model of conduction, where electrons are accelerated by an electric field, and are slowed down by bumping into the lattice, you get the following equation for current density: ...
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3answers
301 views

when we rub objects together, what determines which material will pick up electrons?

For example We know glass when rubbed by silk will become positively charged while the silk will be charged negative. What exactly makes glass appropriate for losing electrons in that experiment? (
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1answer
230 views

Distinguish electron-like and hole-like orbits in reciprocal space, with reference to the Brillouin Zones

So I have a solid state and thermodynamic exam next week and I've been going through some of the previous exams from years gone by to prepare. I came across this question "Distinguish electron-like ...
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2answers
168 views

Reciprocal lattice and phonon

As we obtain a reciprocal lattice for a given crystal we see that discrete values of wavevectors are allowed but a phonon wavevector spectrum is a continuum. Is there a relation between reciprocal ...
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2answers
103 views

What are some ways of inducing spin polarization?

I saw a talk today and they mentioned how nitrogen-vacancy diamond centers can be used to optically induce spin polarization and now I wonder what other ways there are to induce a spin polarization. ...
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299 views

Semi-conductor band-gap and deformation potential

Submitting a semi-conductor to stress leads to a deformation in the energy-bands, roughly described by:$$H_{ij} = {\cal{D}}_{ij}^{\alpha\beta}\;\epsilon_{\alpha\beta}$$ $\epsilon$ being the strain ...
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Effective Mass and Fermi Velocity of Electrons in Graphene:

In graphene, we have (in the low energy limit) the linear energy-momentum dispersion relation: $E=\hbar v_{\rm{F}}|k|$. This expression arises from a tight-binding model, in fact $E =\frac{3\hbar ...