Solid-state physics studies how macroscopic properties of solids (mechanical, electrical, optical, etc.) result from their microscopic structure. It usually deals with the scale where quantum properties of the particles are substantial.

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What does a bucked honeycomb lattice mean?

I was going through some literature where they have mention about bucked honeycomb lattice, but I was unable to understand about the bucked honeycomb term.
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111 views

Can a material made of a heavier isotope of an element become harder or stronger?

I was wondering if any experiments have been done to measure if there is a change in the hardness or strength of a material made solely of a heavier isotope of an element which is a constituent of the ...
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64 views

Can the occupation of Floquet bands be calculated from the Keldysh Green's function?

A periodically driven band structure can be semiclassically described by Floquet theory, resulting in photon-dressed Floquet bands (non-equilibrium steady states). Usually, for non-equilibrium systems,...
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49 views

Effect of Particle Mass on Thermal Conductivity

Fouriers law of thermal conductivity is $$ \vec{q} = -k\nabla T $$ where $q$ is the heat flux, $k$ is the thermal conductivity. Mass does not seem to appear in the equation. So I'm wondering what ...
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23 views

How do phonon modes and other collective atom processes fit in with the Clausius-Mossotti relation?

The Clausius-Mossotti Relation relates the molecular polarizability of a chemical (that is, how much an electric field polarizes the molecule) to its dielectric constant, which determines its optical ...
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37 views

compound bars in series

Compound bars 1 and 2 have lengths L1 and L2, areas A1 and A2, Young moduli E1, E2,thermal expansion coefficient a1 and a2. subjected to a change of temperature T. Two ends of the bar are fixed. The ...
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80 views

What happens to the electron density in a metal during an electric discharge?

Suppose we are able to see into a grain of metal at the boundary between the grain and air (perhaps along one of the faces of this cube): (Source: Wikimedia Commons.) This image does not show the ...
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70 views

Confusion with poles of single particle green's function / propagator

On p22 of "Green's Functions for Solid State Physicists" by Doniach and SondHeimer, there is the following definition: $$G^0(\omega)=\frac{1}{2M\Omega_0}\left( \frac{1}{\omega-\Omega_0+i\eta} - \frac{...
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141 views

Dispersion of light in metals and the plasma frequency

I've been reading about the dielectric function and plasma oscillations recently and I encountered the following dispersion relation for EM waves in metals or in plasma (Is it correct to treat those ...
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1answer
36 views

What does it mean that an electron-hole pair is the fundamental unit of generation?

I wasn't certain to post this in chemistry or physics section. I was reading the wikipedia article on "Carrier generation and recombination" and in the second paragraph it says something that I ...
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119 views

What is a clear definition of vibrons?

What is a clear definition of vibrons? Vibrons are localized Phonons and I need more information about them. It is somewhat vague to me. Can you give some references, please?
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292 views

If s1 and s2 are the spin operators of two electrons, FInd out (s1 .s2) for the singlet and triplet states of hydrogen molecule [closed]

If s1 and s2 are the spin operators of two electrons, FI nd out (s1 .s2) for the singlet and triplet states of hydrogen molecule.
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64 views

Translating Electronic Bands back to first Brilluoin Zone

For phonons, I understand why we can translate everything back into the first Brillouin Zone: there is a minimum wavelength defined by two lattice sites. For electrons, which are delocalized, I see ...
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15 views

Diffusive or balistic? Spread of the wave packet when localized and extended states coexist

If the lattice is perfectly periodic, then the wave packet of a particle initially located on a site spreads balistically. Namely, its size increases linearly in time. Now, introduce disorder into ...
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43 views

How can we prove that each point (hkl) in the reciprocal lattice corresponds to a set of lattice planes (hkl) in the real space lattice?

In crystallography, we always speak about the direct and reciprocal lattice spaces. One property about these spaces in mentioned here, as follows: Each point (hkl) in the reciprocal lattice ...
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137 views

Photoelectric effect

Why the photoelectric effect is observed only for metals and not for non-metals? Isn't it possible for the photon to release an electron from a non-metal surface?
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15 views

semiconductors-band theory [duplicate]

How conduction happens with the conduction band electrons? I mean does the electrons which are responsible for the conduction of holes(by just moving from one atom to other) are those which are ...
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29 views

How to understand the simplified tight-binding representation on square lattice?

I have read a paper in this website:http://cmt.nbi.ku.dk/student_projects/bsc/Haider_Moradi_BSc_thesis.pdf I am curious about how to understand the simplified tight-binding representation on square ...
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25 views

cicumfernatial vector

Once a sheet of graphite is rolled up into a nanotube, the allowed values of k are constrained by the imposition of periodic boundary conditions along the circumferential direction. this periodic ...
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54 views

What is crater's influence on laser ablation?

In many laser ablation experiments (especially Pulsed Laser Deposition), target is moving to avoid crater formation. But I can't find any source that says why it is needed to avoid it. So why is ...
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1answer
50 views

What is the underlying transport mechanism of electron drift in metals?

The equations involving drift speed, mobility and conductivity, $v_d=\mu E$ and $\sigma=\mu e n$, treat electrons in a Newtonian way. This model works well in practice (at least in macro scale), but I ...
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28 views

Quasi-electron lifetime at Dirac (Weyl) point

I would like to know how one should calculate the electron lifetime with chemical potential at the Dirac point from Fermi Golden Rule: \begin{equation} \frac{1}{\tau_k}=\frac{2\pi}{\hbar}\frac{1}{V^2}...
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56 views

What are the current carriers in a PN junction?

Imagine a PN junction in forward bias mode. The conventional current goes from the p-side to the n-side. However, as mobile holes move to the n-side, aren't there mobile electrons on the n-side which ...
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1answer
111 views

What is the difference between Fermi level and Fermi edge?

Just as in title: What is the difference between Fermi level and Fermi edge? My friend makes some research about XPS and he encountered this term. He knows what is Fermi level, but never heard about ...
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157 views

For the transition metals, how does counting the number of up-spins and down-spins still give you a non-integer magnetic moment?

The transition metals like Fe, Co and Ni have magnetic moments of 2.2, 1.7 and 0.6 Bohr magnetons, respectively. The band theory says that you get this when you calculate the density-of-states of the ...
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Photon absorption and emission in 2nd quantization

I am looking for models which describe the interaction of matter (lets take a 1D chain of atoms) with photons, especially the emission and absorption. I would love to see the derivation of models in ...
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125 views

Why do Weyl points come in pairs in solid state system?

Quoted from "Beyond Band Insulators: Topology of Semi-metals and Interacting Phases" by Turner and Vishwanath: In 3D lattice models, Weyl points always come in pairs of opposite helicity; this ...
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50 views

Are deforming force and stress always equal? If they are equal, then why does shape of the body get deformed?

If the deforming force is equal to the restoring force then there is no impact of the deforming force on the body. Then the shape of the body remains constant. How does the body deform, then?
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31 views

Numerically evaluating momentum sums

For many-body systems, calculations often involve momentum sums, which are ultimately evaluated numerically for a finite system size $N$. The larger $N$ is, the more accurate the results. Is there ...
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1answer
42 views

Difference between mechanical modes and phonons

As stated in this review article: Mechanical modes are long compared to the interatomic spacing. It is natural to make the distinction between nanomechanical modes and phonons: The former are ...
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27 views

Why are only some materials ferromagnetic? [duplicate]

I've been told in my solid state class, that ferromagnetism occurs when electron spins are alligned. This happens, as I understand it, when it is "energitically favorable" and when the wavefunction is ...
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207 views

Why polymeric solids are said to be intermediate between crystalline solids and amorphous solids?

Crystalline solids have ordered arrangement and amorphous solids do not. Polymeric solids are simply formed by the joining of some monomeric units. It has nothing to do with ordered or not ordered ...
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36 views

How to escape freeze-out effects of semiconductors in very low temperature

In very low temperature, semiconductors suffer from freeze-out effects. I did see that degenerately doping eliminates freeze-out, but degenerate semiconductors behave like metals. Is/can there ...
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43 views

What is ferromagnetism?

Simple question. As far as I've understood it; a ferromagnetic material is one where all the electron spins are alligned parallely - that is, the wavefunction has an antisymmetric spacial part and a ...
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24 views

Properties of materials _not_ dependent on fermi surface?

So I'm studying a second solid state physics course where we've covered calculating things like magnetic susceptibility, specific heat and resistivity by considering excitations of electrons around ...
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2answers
182 views

Why do metals become insulators when oxidized?

I don't know the connection between how forming a new bond with oxygen then changes the density of states to transform the metal into an insulator. It seems like a very powerful transformation.
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114 views

Zero Hall coefficient for semiconductors

Is it possible to dope the semiconductors in a way that their hall coefficient is zero?
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15 views

Hall coefficient for semiconductors

I read somewhere that hall coefficient for intrinsic semiconductors is zero. But how is that possible because the mobiliities of holes and electrons are never the same?
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1answer
36 views

What is the relation between Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR)? [duplicate]

It seems to me that the basic principles are exactly the same, right? Then I am puzzled that the former was awarded a nobel prize while the later not. I noticed a similar question here What's the ...
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1answer
73 views

How do we know that the x-ray pattern is in the reciprocal space? [closed]

I wonder if any one can tell that why do we consider the x-ray pattern (for example, a x-ray pattern on a film for a crystal) in the reciprocal space? (I don't want any explanation about the Ewald ...
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1answer
41 views

How deep within the sample can the DOS(density of states) be detected by STM(scanning tunnel microscope)?

Using STM equipment, we can get the LDOS(local density of states) on the surface of a sample. I want to know whether the LDOS within the sample(not surface) can be detected by STM. what is the ...
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198 views

Is the thermal conductivity of metals affected by magnetic fields?

Especially for a ferromagnet a magnetic field should have a field-induced band shift in the density of states but I wonder if this shift is big enough to be significant and affect the thermal ...
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56 views

Is the saturation magnetization of a thin film different if you apply the field at different directions?

I'm getting different values of the saturation magnetization when I measure them in-plane versus out of plane. The saturation magnetization for the out of plane measurement is greater than in the in ...
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1answer
40 views

Why is the vapor pressure important for people that grow films in high vacuum chambers?

I don't understand what this vapor pressure is. The definition from wikipedia is unclear to me. If I look at two materials and one has a higher vapor pressure than the other, does that mean that the ...
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1answer
233 views

What is the significance of the Debye temperature from a materials perspctive?

If I look at a table of different metals and their Debye temperatures, what does the variation in these temperatures tell me about these materials?
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1answer
221 views

Relation between band structure, dispersion, density of states, and the Fermi energy and Fermi level

Despite the long title, this question is mostly qualitative (although I am interested in quantitative results if possible). Say you have an electronic band structure (energy as a function of "k") for ...
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2answers
138 views

Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculation for metals

Why is DFT not used in calculating electronic structures and properties of metals? I know DFT calculations are not accurate for metallic structures. Can someone explain why?
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26 views

Band structure and k vectors

If there is a restriction on the allowed states (k vectors) for a system, ie the no of states is equal to twice the number of unit cells in the crystal.. why do we plot k continuously on the x axis? ...
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Why dopant energy levels differ from one material to another?

Dopant levels in Si, Ge and GaAs are very different from each other. Even "similar" materials such as Si and Ge exhibit different dopant energy levels. (source: Pierret, Advanced Semiconductor ...
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56 views

What is theMost compressible material commonly found? [closed]

I'd like to know which solid material is highly compressable . I think plastic is widely available and quite compressable. What is something better?