Solid-state physics studies how macroscopic properties of solids (mechanical, electrical, optical, etc.) result from their microscopic structure. It usually deals with the scale where quantum properties of the particles are substantial.

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Is the ferromagnetism of iron understood completely?

In Feynman's lecture notes, he said that it is not (at his time). How is the situation today? Can first-principle calculation accounts the ferromagnetism of iron quantitatively now?
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What “propagates” a force through the rest of a solid?

So, in typing the title of this question I was recommended this awesome one, which confirmed my guess that this effect "propagates" at the speed of sound (though I just had a feeling, I don't really ...
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What is an electron/hole pocket and what is the significance?

What is an electron/hole pocket and what is the significance? I'm trying to get my head around this. I've read what Ashcroft and Mermin have to say on the subject, but it's a little convoluted. They ...
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600 views

Does a quantum phase transition have latent heat?

As the title says, I am thinking about the question that whether a quantum phase transition has latent heat. If so, at 0 temperature, we can drive the system by some parameter from disorder phase to ...
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267 views

maximum positive electric charge of solid body

What are the limiting factors on the positive charge of a solid body? If I assume a 'perfect insulator' environment that would not exchange charge with my solid body, I would guess that I can remove ...
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quantum and thermal fluctuations in 1D, 2D, 3D

Why do thermal and quantum fluctuations destroy long-range order in 1D and 2D? Why not in 3D? If the answer is quite elaborated (with many formulas) perhaps a reference would be better. Sorry if this ...
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335 views

Chronological and normal ordering

I've realized I'm little bit confused when I want to treat elements like this $$\left<\phi_0|T\{a_p(t)a_p^+(t')V(t_1)V(t_2)\}|\phi_0\right>$$ with $$V(t)=\dfrac12 \dfrac{1}{(2\pi \hbar)^9}\...
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796 views

Topological insulators - Surface states have a phase?

When I look at the circle of the Dirac cone around the Dirac point of, let's say, $Bi_2Se_3$, then the electron winds around and it is true that it goes from momentum $-k$ and spin-up to $+k$ and spin-...
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Why is calcium paramagnetic?

As far as I understand, magnetism comes from the 'unpaired electrons' in the subshells of atoms. Atoms with paired electrons are diamagnetic ('not magnetic') while atoms with unpaired electrons are ...
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653 views

How is a Majorana fermion created when a s-wave superconductors is in proximity to a topological insulator (e.g. via an antidot)

Kane and Fu proposed a few geometries how to create Majorana zero modes using a s-wave superconductor in proximity to a 3D topological insulator (TI). -> http://www.physics.upenn.edu/~kane/pubs/p56....
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How robust is Kramers degeneracy in real material?

Kramers theorem rely on odd total number of electrons. In reality, total number of electrons is about 10^23. Can those electrons be so smart to count the total number precisely and decide to form ...
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583 views

In what way do Cooper pairs of electrons bond and stay bonded in superconductors?

I understand how electrons initially move into another's vicinity, but nowhere can I find a fathomable answer to this. Also, does the pairs forming 'a condensate' mean a Bose-Einstein condensate?
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Can surface dipoles/charges change the work function of a metal?

As typically drawn in simplified band diagrams (see picture below), the metal Fermi Level is shown as the top of the conduction band, with the entire band filled. In many situations, including ...
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640 views

How does thermal broadening of the Fermi Function cause electron coherence loss?

Generally, there are two ways for electrons to lose their wave-like properties in a solid material. One is by way of collisions that cause changes in the energy and momentum of the electron. The other ...
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34 views

What's the difference in the film between sputtering deposition and an ebeam evaporator?

I know the differences between the two deposition techniques, but what about the difference in the properties of the resulting films? All things being equal (such as substrate temperature), would ...
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How does crystal lattice explain electrical conductance?

From http://education.jlab.org In a metal, the atoms are arranged in a crystal-like configuration. ... Now, in a metal, the valence band is relatively close to the conduction band - ...
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364 views

If atoms have specific energy levels, why do opaque solids absorb all visible light, not just some? [duplicate]

Here's my question: if atoms have well defined energy levels and those differences correspond to the frequencies of light that can be absorbed, how is it that opaque objects absorb all or most visible ...
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433 views

Crystal Momentum in a Periodic Potential

I'm working through some basic theory on periodic potentials, and I would appreciate help in understanding the crystal momentum. Suppose we have a Bravais lattice with lattice vectors $\textbf{R}$. ...
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How do I calculate integral analytically for small $k$?

In a Heisenberg antiferromagnet, the dispersion relation is \begin{equation} \omega_{\mathbf{k}} =JSz\sqrt{ 1-\gamma_{\mathbf{k}}^2} \end{equation} where $\gamma_{\mathbf{k}}=\frac{1}{d}\sum_{i=1}^...
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Relation between density and refractive index of medium

Is there any relation between Refractive index and density of a material? It is not found to be proportional in my experimental results. Is there any equation to relate these parameters?
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How can I derive the Phonon Density of Normal Modes in two and three dimensions?

The density of normal modes in 1D has already been discussed in another post (LINK) In essence, the formula is: $$D(\omega) = \frac{1}{2\pi}\int\mathrm{d}q\,\delta(\omega-\omega(q))$$ resulting in ...
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63 views

Is diamagnetism a static or dynamic effect?

When we put a diamagnetic material in the presence of an external magnetic field $\vec B_0$, the magnetic field inside the material decreases to $$\vec B=(1+\chi_m)\vec B_0,$$ where the magnetic ...
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Electron degeneracy pressure

Why is it that in stars undergoing gravitational collapse electron degeneracy kicks in? Why couldn't the electrons form energy bands like in semiconductors?
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Why can we quantize macro(meso)scopic harmonic oscillator?

It is well known that we have got many kinds of quantized macro(meso)scopic harmonic oscillators or so in tiny mechanical systems. People are talking about cavity cooling and so on. However, it is ...
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In a positively biased PN junction, where do the injection carriers come from?

I am not quite understand i-v character of PN-junction diode. Here is the model in textbook. The PN junction diode can be divided into three regions. They are One depletion region near the PN ...
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How to interpret band structures

I'm currently taking a Solid State Physics class, and is currently reading about the quantum mechanical description of solids. I then came across the following figure: It's supposed to be the band ...
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366 views

Anisotropic refractive index with isotropic components?

In relation to my question here I wanted to make sure that my physical argument was not flawed. Anisotropic properties, (especially refractive index) is characteristic of a well-ordered solid (...
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987 views

Need help understanding Semiconductor physics

I am trying to read Kittel for a project, and he mentions the properties on silicon and germanium so briefly, that I don't understand it at all. He talks about p states, and I don't really know what ...
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108 views

Is diffraction through an aperture similar to diffraction by a plane of atoms?

I'm asking because I have a problem asking me what the diffraction pattern would be if instead of spherical atoms I'd have triangular atoms. I can't find anything about this in my X-ray diffraction ...
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399 views

What is crystal field anisotropy or effect ? It forces the magnetic moment to point in particular local direction..

Can you give a basic explanation of what is crystal field anisotropy ? What is the reason to arise ? In spin ice it forces the dipoles to point in the local 111 direction. For partially filled rare ...
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188 views

What is the mass of the emergent magnetic monopoles in spin ice and how is the mass of an emergent particle determined?

In solid state physics emergent particles are very common. How one determines if they are gap-less excitations? Do the defects in spin ice called magnetic monopoles have mass? What is the mass of ...
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338 views

Lorentz invariance of a frequency- and wavelength- dependent dielectric tensor

Suppose we have a material described by a dielectric tensor $\bar{\epsilon}$. In frequency domain, this tensor depends on the wave frequency $\omega$ and the wave vector $\vec{k}$. Clearly not all $\...
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Derivation of TKNN's main result from Kubo formula

I have a question about a small but meaningful (to me at least) step in the original TKNN paper (http://journals.aps.org/prl/abstract/10.1103/PhysRevLett.49.405). I understand the construction of the ...
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In what circumstances, can exchange interaction acquire temperature dependence?

Heisenberg exchange interaction (sometimes called as magnetic stiffness?), originating from the Coulomb interaction and the Fermion statistics, is widely used in theories of magnetism. Conventionally, ...
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Does a conducting wire give off measurable radiation?

In the Drude model (semi-classical, but should still apply here I think), the conducting electrons are in a constant electric field, and, in between collisions with the lattice ions (that happen, on ...
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75 views

How can one reasonably theoretically model polycrystalline materials?

Many techniques are taught in advanced solid state courses but they are almost all derived for perfectly crystalline materials. For example, band structure really only appears theoretically when you ...
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Separating the hamiltonian for a superlattice — is it this easy?

I've been banging my head against a wall trying to figure out what I'm sure is a very simple problem. I want to solve the Kronig Penney model for a superlattice, which is just a normal periodic 1D ...
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Distinguishable, Indistinguishable Paramagnetic Ideal Gas

In the canonical ensemble, the partition function for an ideal gas is given by: $$\frac{Z}{N!}$$ The factor $N!$ accounts for the indistinguishability of the particles of the ideal gas. What ...
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Non-Hermiticity when Fourier transforming onto a finite lattice

I'm doing numerical simulations. I have the Haldane model in a honeycomb lattice where $$ H = \sum \limits_{<ij>}a^\dagger_i b_j + h.c $$ Where $i$ belongs to sublattice $A$, and $j$ to ...
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Where to learn Temperature Dependent Conductivity induced by Electron-Phonon Interaction? [closed]

I want to learn how to calculate the temperature dependent conductivity induced by electron-phonon interaction. I know in low temperature, the resistance in metal $\rho$ is proportional to $T^5$, $T$ ...
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Do we say that phonon has effective mass through its dispersion relation?

The effective mass is proportional to the second derivative of the dispersion relation d2k/dE2. Do we say that phonon have effective mass through it ? Spin wave have.
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Can Non-Magnetic Dust Particles become magnetic if their particle size is decreased (by grinding them probably)?

Problem: Take some dust particles whose size is big. Bring a magnet near them. They do not get attracted to the magnet and thus we conclude that they are non-magnetic. However, when you grind the ...
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159 views

The conduction electrons in metals is a thermal phenomenon?

When applying an external electric field in a metal at absolute zero, there is electrical current? There must be thermal fluctuations in the electron's band to be occurs current?
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Are all metals good conductor of electricity?

I am writing an article for kids, which is on conductors and insulators of electricity. If I make a statement that "All metals are electrical conductors and all non-metals are electrical insulators" ...
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877 views

Intro to Solid State Physics

I didn't see this listed on the books page so here it is. I'm currently in an introductory Solid State course, and we are using Kittel's book. I have been having a rough time with this book although I ...
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3k views

Fermi level alignment and electrochemical potential between two metals

I'm trying to get a more intuitive/physical grasp of the Fermi level, like I have of electric potential. I know that, for just a single piece of metal in equilibrium, you have to have the electric ...
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What is different between resolvent and green function

I bumped into a book, where Resolvent $R^{\pm}(E)$ is defined as $e^{\mp iHt/\hbar}=\pm\frac{i}{2\pi}\int_{-\infty}^{\infty}dER^{\pm}(E)e^{\mp iEt/\hbar}$ and $R^{\pm}(E)=\frac{1}{\pm i\hbar}\int_0^{...
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Why does the density of states in a solid scale as $\sqrt{E}$?

In three dimensions, the density of states of a free electron is the square root of the energy of the electron. Can somebody explain the relationship between this dependence and the shape/formation of ...
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Dispersion relation for lattice vibrations: Why are there two and not four solutions?

A linear chain of diatomic molecules can be modeled by a chain of molecules with different spring constants $C_1$ and $C_2$ (See Figure) The corresponding equations of motion are: $$M\ddot{u}=-c_1[...
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What does it mean that a Cooper pair behaves as a boson but respects the obligations of fermions?

I refer to the fact that it has integer spin, but antisymmetric wavefunction. How is this possible?