Solid-state physics studies how macroscopic properties of solids (mechanical, electrical, optical, etc.) result from their microscopic structure. It usually deals with the scale where quantum properties of the particles are substantial.

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Why is Graphene Transparent?

Graphene is always in the news now a days and its key features are that it is; very strong, conductive and transparent. It is so transparent that each layer of graphene will only absorb 2% of Light ...
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Pn junction voltage drop?

This image from wikipedia, explains that there occurs a potential drop across a pn semiconductor junction, and an electric field confined to the depletion region. I already know the reason for the ...
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Mathematical rigorous introduction to solid state physics

I am looking for a good mathematical rigorous introduction to solid state physics. The style and level for this solid state physics book should be comparable to Abraham Marsdens Foundations of ...
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bare Phonon and Symmetry Breaking

In condensed matter physics, the phonon is considered as a quasiparticle which is a result of the quantization of lattice vibrations. In many textbooks on solid state physics, it can be done if we ...
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Are there materials that get softer with temperature decrease?

Could be there material that begins melting/softening when it's temperature is lowered? I would say no, but I've seen enough physics to know that not always life is so easy. Moreover I think I've ...
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Is it possible to have solid light? [closed]

Is it possible to have solid light? If so, what would it be like?
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How many of the 230 crystallographic groups are realized in nature?

All of them or only a subset? This is a famous and fundamental result in solid state physics.
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Numerical analytic continuation for Green's function

Recently, I happened to hear about the possibility of doing analytic continuation numerically. That sounds attractive for the ubiquitous $\mathrm{i}\omega_n\rightarrow\omega+\mathrm{i}0^+$ procedure, ...
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Lagrangian of 2D square lattice of point masses connected by springs

Zee's QFT book mentions the Lagrangian of a square 2D horizontal lattice of point masses, connected by springs, and considering only vertical displacements $q_{i}$, as $ L = \frac{1}{2} \sum\limits_{...
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Basic Question - Green's Functions in Quantum Mechanics

I am trying to learn about Green's functions as part of my graduate studies and have a rather basic question about them: In my maths textbooks and a lot of places online, the basic Greens function G ...
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If I take a handful of salt and wait for an infinite time will it become a single crystal?

That pretty much says it. Suppose I have some powder of $NaCl$. It is kept in contact with itself in vacuum. You are free to remove all the disturbances that bother you. Is that true that, well, ...
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What are the six degrees of freedom of the atoms in a solid?

A monoatomic ideal gas has heat capacity $C_v=1.5$ which comes from the three translational degrees of freedom. For solids at high temperature, $C_v=3$, implying six degrees of freedom. What are ...
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To what extent can the superconducting order parameter be thought of as a macroscopic wavefunction?

I know that the order parameter does not obey the Schrodinger equation; it instead obeys the Ginzburg-Landau equation. However, I am unclear as to the situations under which the view of the ...
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Simulating the evolution of a wavepacket through a crystal lattice

I am interested simulating the evolution of an electronic wave packet through a crystal lattice which does not exhibit perfect translational symmetry. Specifically, in the Hamiltonian below, the ...
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Quantum numbers and the band structure of solids

I got a question concerning the band strucutre of solids. The reference I'm using is the book on solid state physics by Ashcroft/Mermin. My problem is that I don't completely understand the reason ...
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408 views

Adiabatic approximation

The adiabatic approximation for solid state systems is rather radical. I was wondering in which cases it breaks down. As it is based on the idea of the nuclii being much heavier than the electrons I ...
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Why do Fermi liquids have T^2 resistivity?

I have often read that metals that are Fermi liquids should have a resistivity that varies with temperature like $\rho(T) = \rho(0) + a T^2 $. I guess the $T^2$ part is the resistance due to electron-...
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Nano-particle or Molecule?

What's the difference between something being labeled a "nano-particle" or it being called a "molecule"?
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What is the difference between Raman scattering and fluorescence?

What is the difference between Raman scattering and fluorescence? Both phenomena involve the emission of photons shifted in frequency relative to the incident light, because of some energetic ...
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Graphene +1 extra carbon bond

I'm not a physicist just a curious mind, so please go easy! I was just watching a BBC Horizon Documentary that featured a piece on the recently discovered material Graphene. One of the facts ...
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Are there solid materials with controllable porosity?

In analogy to piezoelectric materials, where the application of an electrical field creates mechanical deformation in the material, I have the following question. Are there solid materials whose ...
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270 views

What is the phenomenological logic behind Fermi liquid theory

I am a super beginner when it comes to Solid State Physics and when wanting to learn more on the subject, I end up reading on Landau's Fermi liquid theory that supposedly justifies the quasi-free ...
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When is use of the 'effective mass' concept appropriate?

In textbooks the characteristic length scale of an exciton, or an electron bound to dopant atom, in silicon is calculated by analogy to the vacuum case. Bohr radius in vacuum: $$a_0 = \frac{4 \pi \...
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Are they the same thing: Wigner distribution in quantum Boltzmann equation and Wigner function in quantum optics?

We know that quantum Boltzmann equation (QBE) is an equation of motion for the interacting Green's function $G^<(\vec{x}_1,t_1;\vec{x}_2,t_2)\equiv\mathrm{i}\langle \psi^\dagger(x_2)\psi(x_1)\...
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Real and imaginary parts of dielectric constant vs refractive index?

So for a complex dielectric constant $\epsilon = \epsilon_a + i\epsilon_b$, the wave vector and index of refraction are related to it through $k = \frac{\omega}{c}n$ and $n = \sqrt{\frac{\mu \epsilon}{...
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The definition of Density of States

The density of states (DOS) is generally defined as $D(E)=\frac{d\Omega(E)}{dE}$, where $\Omega(E)$ is the number of states. But why DOS can also be defined using delta function, as $$D(E)~=~\sum\...
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Why is glass a good conductor of heat?

AFAIK Glass is insulator, it doesn't have free electron. It's said metal is a good conductor of heat because it has free electron, glass doesn't have free electron, why it is a good conductor of heat?
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Is the thermal conductivity of metals affected by magnetic fields?

Especially for a ferromagnet a magnetic field should have a field-induced band shift in the density of states but I wonder if this shift is big enough to be significant and affect the thermal ...
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Why is the Hubbard model written down so late?

It is just the tight binding model plus on-site interaction. What prevented people from arriving at the Hubbard model?
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Change of basis in non-linear Schrodinger equation

At the mean-field level, the dynamics of a polariton condensate can be described by a type of nonlinear Schrodinger equation (Gross-Pitaevskii-type), for a classical (complex-number) wavefunction $\...
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Are electronic wavefunctions in band gap insulators localized? is a single-particle picture sufficient in this case?

I am having trouble understanding the physics of band gap insulators. Usually in undergrad solid state physics one looks at non-interacting electrons in a periodic potential, with no disorder. Then, ...
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Temperature dependence of resistivity in metals

We know that in high temperature, resistivity in metals goes linearly with temperature. As temperature is lowered, resistivity goes first as $T^5$ due to "electron-phonon" interaction, and then goes ...
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Order of magnetic phase transitions

Is there any phase transition occur in paramagnetism to diamagnetism transitions state. What should be the order and how will I calculate the order?
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Is differential geometry used in solid state?

I'm an undergraduate in physics interested in a career in solid state. While I know that any additional math is helpful--I am on time constraints, and can only take a few supplemental classes. That ...
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Real part of the AC conductivity has a discrete spectrum => What physics?

If the real part of the AC conductivity $\text{Re}[\sigma(\omega)]$ has a discrete spectrum only, i.e., $\text{Re}[\sigma(\omega)]=a_1\delta(\omega-\omega_1)+a_2\delta(\omega-\omega_2)+\cdots,$ what ...
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The skin effect and the reflectivity of gold

I am simulating a waveguide in COMSOL, a FEM solver. My model looks like this (it is similar to a standard Quantum Cascade Laser geometry): Therefore there is a very thin (30nm) layer of gold ...
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Reduce integration over crystal to integration over unit cell

I am wondering when I can reduce integrals over a periodic crystal to a an integral over the unit cell. Especially I consider the following two-electron integral $$ I=\langle \varphi_i \varphi_j | V | ...
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Finding difficulties in taking continuum limit in nonlinear sigma model

I am learning nonlinear sigma model from Assa Auerbach's book "Interacting Electrons and Quantum Magnetism" and getting some difficulties in taking continuum limit. I am following chapter 12: The ...
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Temperature dependence of the relaxation time in Boltzmann equation for impurity scattering in metals

Is there any temperature dependence of relaxation time in impurity scattering of conducting electrons? It seems to me that there is none. But, some people claim that there is. So if you could explain,...
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What prevents bosons from occupying the same location?

The Pauli exclusion principle states that no two fermions can share identical quantum states. Bosons, one the other hand, face no such prohibition. This allows multiple bosons to essentially occupy ...
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Proof of existence of lowest temperature $0 K$

Im mathematics there is a concept of infinity meaning that whenever you pick a number and say that it is the smallest/Largest there is a way to further reduce/increase that number by subtracting/...
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How does an electron move through a metal or a semiconductor

I understand that atoms in a metal or semiconductor are bonded and that they will have several eigenstates where electrons can reside. When a voltage is applied electrons in eigenstates will move to ...
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How does current flow in superconductors if Cooper pairs have zero momentum?

I've been reading a lot of condensed matter textbooks, which state both that the net momentum of a Cooper pair in a superconductor is zero, and that Cooper pairs have momentum when they carry current. ...
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Why doesn't topological phase transition break any symmetry? Hidden symmetry?

This question may be superficial. However why all people saying this without a proof? Just like the "hidden variables" assumption in quantum mechanics, can one disproof that there is no hidden ...
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Why are most ferromagnets metals while antiferromagnets are insulators?

This seems to be experimentally true, but I don't quite have an intuition as to why. In the Ising model, we usually consider an insulating ferromagnet if $J>0$, where $J$ is the exchange coupling. ...
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What is the state of matter of a (solid) yogurt?

Maybe this is a silly question, but I'm not quite sure. Consider a solid yogurt. Can we assign a specific state of matter to it? I mean, it behaves like solid. However, if we "mix" it with a spoon, ...
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What is the difference between a photon and a phonon?

More specifically, how does a wave-particle duality differ from a quasiparticle/collective excitation? What makes a photon a gauge boson and a phonon a Nambu–Goldstone boson?
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Difference between steady state and equilibrium?

In semiconductor physics, what is the difference between steady state and equilibrium. How analysis of devices varies in these processes?
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Why do some things crystallize? (And others don't, for that matter.)

Ice, for example, will form a crystal when frozen under certain circumstances. Why is this the case for ice? While on the subject of water crystallization, why do snowflakes usually form in base 6 ...
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Does it make sense to define the mean free path in quantum mechanics?

The mean free path defined in classical molecule dynamics has a strong classical flavor. Is it sensible to generalize the idea to quantum mechanics?