Solid-state physics studies how macroscopic properties of solids (mechanical, electrical, optical, etc.) result from their microscopic structure. It usually deals with the scale where quantum properties of the particles are substantial.

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How can a metal and an insulator have high dielectrics yet one is conducting and one is insulating?

I don't get it: insulators are referred to as dielectrics. The higher the dielectric the higher the insulation(?). But the dielectric constant of metals is considered infinite. Aren't they supposed to ...
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27 views

What does it mean lattice softening and stiffening?

Which kind of proceedings does it pretend? And why it is applied to examine high temperature superconductivity?
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12 views

How Cooper pairs conduct curent [duplicate]

we know that electrons in superconductor are coupled somehow (How does Cooper pairing work?) creating quasi-particles called cooper pairs which are Bosons and going to ground state ( do not obey ...
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10 views

conduction mechanism

How can someone distinguish between hopping and thermal activation conductivity respectevely, if in a Arrhenius plot (Log[σ] to 1000/T) the activation energy is constant and independent of DC electric ...
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45 views

Why do we use the anticommutation relation for particle-hole and chiral symmetries?

In physics we say that a quantity is conserved if its operator commutes with Hamiltonian. For example, in condensed matter systems, when the momentum $k$ commutes with the Hamiltonian $H$ as ...
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In non-metallic solids w/ just atoms or ions (no molecules), are bonds (vibrations) and electronic transitions the sole cause of blackbody radiation?

Since there wouldn't be a conduction band filled with any electrons in a non-metallic solid made of just atoms or ions (no molecules), it's hard to imagine any other type of movement and dipole moment ...
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19 views

Are k-points in the reciprocal lattice, points where constructive interference is the strongest?

I saw a video on youtube that seemed to imply that k-points are the positions where constructive interference is strongest. The link is https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DFFU39A3fPY Is this true? I ...
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68 views

Derivation of the Brillouin function

In a Solid State Physics problem, I am asked to demonstrate that the magnetization of a set of atoms or ions with identical angular momentum $J$ is proportional to the Brillouin function, defined as ...
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18 views

The probability of photoluminescence

Was reading about premeditated doping in semiconductors and the effect it imposes on the emission spectrum, doping as I read introduces defect states which are close to either the valence band edge or ...
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3answers
35 views

Number of atoms in HCP unit cell

Whenever the atomic packing factor for the hexagonal close-packed (HCP) crystal structure is discussed, such as in this wikipedia article, it is stated that the (effective) number $N$ of atoms in a ...
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23 views

How is Q-carbon made?

How is Q- carbon made ? https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Q-carbon Why a nanosecond laser is needed? How is it cooled ?
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28 views

Tight-binding model of graphene - filling in a few steps

I'm trying to figure out the tight-binding model for graphene after not using any of my solid-state knowledge for a few years. I am getting lost in notation and I was hoping for some help filling in ...
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23 views

Understanding derivation of tight-binding model of graphene

I am trying to understand the derivation of the tight-binding model for graphene. In several papers I have come across on the subject, I see notation like that found in equation 4 here: ...
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54 views

chern number as an obstruction to choose a smooth gauge

In condensed matter physics, I heard that if chern number of a band $n$ is non zero, it is impossible to choose a gauge such that $\psi_{nk}$ is smooth in the whole brillouin zone. However, it is ...
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43 views

Application of Sommerfeld model on Weyl semimetals

I'm studying Solid State Physics. I know how to describe the Sommerfeld model, but I don't know how to apply it on Weyl semimetals. The dispersion relation on Weyl semimetals is the following: ...
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33 views

When electrons absorb energy and get excited then jump to a higher energy level do they do so in steps or do it directly?

So I was reading about Fermi surfaces. One of the first things that is obvious is that energy excitations happen at the boundary of the surface as the electrons deeper inside the surface do not have ...
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Semiconductors, Solid-State Physics

We know, that conductors, conduct because their valence energy band is "half" full, and k ("wave vector") can increase and therefore the electrons under the influence of a electric field can "move", ...
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electron blocking layer and hole blocking layer

What is basically an electron blocking layer and a hole blocking layer in contrast to an electron transport layer or a hole transport layer? In terms of the bandgap, I think if the case is one of a ...
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309 views

Measuring the effective mass

Intro: To avoid any terminology confusion, this is asked in the context of Solid State Physics and semiconductors. The canonical definition given for the effective mass is that it is related to the ...
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How do we determine whether the tight binding model is valid for a material?

Right now I know that the tight binding model applies when electrons are tightly localized around the ions in the material. How do we determine whether the electrons are actually tightly localized for ...
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132 views

How should I be thinking about phonons?

I have started learning solid state physics and i am struggling with the concept of phonons. I understand how the vibrational wave can be quantised (because of quantum oscillators) and thought of as ...
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In solids, is it phonons, or is it the oscillations of electrons in bands, that emit most of the blackbody radiation?

In solids (most any object we see), which tends to emit most of the blackbody radiation: phonons (atomic, or molecular dipole, lattice vibrations) or oscillating electrons in their energy bands?
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2answers
75 views

Difference between a wavevector and wavefunction

I often see both terms used in textbooks, but I am not sure whether I understand the difference between them. Both describe the state of a system, however, they seem different in some ways. From what ...
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variable range hopping

Having an Arrhenius plot for the logarigthm of conductivity vs 1000/T, I noticed a region in which i assume variable range hopping takes place. Then i draw the plot logarigthm of conductivity vs ...
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Which crystal defects might single, very bright Reflexes in Laue Images indicate?

In a Laue X-ray crystallography , if you observe a single Laue reflex very bright, which is not one of the main reflexes, can that indicate a certain crystal defect or is it a peculiarity in the ...
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What is the equation of bending of the rectangular plate under the pressure?

I want to figure out bending shape of the glass window under the wind pressure, with these assumptions: Wind pressure is homogeneous. All of edges of window are fixed. Glass is isotropic material. ...
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1answer
37 views

Review article recommendation in the field of 2d materials

I am new to 2d materials. I tried to search related review articles in review of modern physics, but did not find anyone covering the whole of the 2d material area. Anybody can recommend some latest ...
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What is the best book for understanding solid state physics for undergraduates? [duplicate]

I have read Charles Kittel's book. But I thought it is higher than undergraduate level. Can any body suggest a best book which explains from the beginning of the topic?
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Proof that 1d lattice displacement by phonons is given $u_{n\pm 1}(t) = A_ke^{i\omega_k t} e^{i knd}e^{\pm i k d}$

I looked in «Kittel - Introduction to solid state physics», Wikipedia and Google for the derivation that: A phonon of wavenumber $k$ displaces the $s$-th atom in a monoatomic 1d crystal lattice by a ...
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31 views

Why photoluminescene spectrum is not identical to electroluminescence spectrum?

Electroluminescence (EL) and photoluminescence (PL) spectra are not identical: there's a small red-shift of the PL spectrum relative to the EL spectrum. Why is this happening if both EL and PL are ...
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48 views

what does d spacing between planes in a crystal lattice mean?

I have trouble understanding the meaning of d-spacing. d spacing is supposed to give the interplanar distance. for a cubic lattice $$d_{hk \ell}= \frac {a} { \sqrt{h^2 + k^2 + \ell ^2} } $$ What i ...
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1answer
46 views

What is the Goldstone mode when rotation symmetry breaks in lattice?

In textbooks for introducing Goldstone mode, people usually consider about phonon as a Goldstone mode emerging from translation symmetry breaking in lattice. However, the rotation symmetry also ...
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How to determine the basis of any crystal

In the following example, I have a rutile TiO2. Here the basis of O with respect to Ti is (0.3*x, 0.3*y, 0*z), where a,b,c are the lattice vectors. So in order to build a crystal, I need the basis and ...
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41 views

Basic question about valence/conduction bands

In most introductions to solid state physics that I've read, they explain the origin, basically, of the band gap as follows: By doing a superposition of the standing waves inside a BZ, one can find ...
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114 views

Density of states for graphene

I have seen a lot of plots for the density of states for graphene: but have been unable to find the calculation explicetely. I know the dispersion relation for graphene is $E_{\pm} (\textbf{k}) ...
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In what circumstances, can exchange interaction acquire temperature dependence?

Heisenberg exchange interaction (sometimes called as magnetic stiffness?), originating from the Coulomb interaction and the Fermion statistics, is widely used in theories of magnetism. Conventionally, ...
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19 views

Conductive n-type material in pn junction

I'm interested in this question from the point of view of a solar cell. In a pn junction (example, p: CIGS, n: CdS), when the n-type material is very conductive, why will the junction not be ...
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2answers
68 views

Why is amorphous classified solid?

Because it does not have a crystal structure, it is hard to find physical similarities with a solid. Why isn't it then another state other than solid? The physics of amorphous is also quite different ...
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20 views

Is it possible to derive the shape of the bending plates by use calculus of variations?

Of course the main idea to solve this problem is find the physical quantity which is have smallest or largest value. I’ve tried some, such as area of surfaces, But I think it can’t be a solution. Does ...
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1answer
30 views

Generate exciton with parallel/anti-parallel spin

How can I experimentally generate excitons, controlling the spin-polarization of the participated electron and hole to be either exclusively parallel or anti-parallel?
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What is the status of energy storing battery technology? [closed]

Most of electronic devices work off electric mains for short time (e.g., on smart phones - for a day or less). It is disappointing the solid state battery technology is moving slowly while othe ...
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What's the difference in the film between sputtering deposition and an ebeam evaporator?

I know the differences between the two deposition techniques, but what about the difference in the properties of the resulting films? All things being equal (such as substrate temperature), would ...
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Intersection of $\rho_{xx}$ and $\rho_{xy}$ in Drude magnetotransport

Okay, so I've recently been working through the rather elementary derivation of the Hall effect in a 2 dimensional electron gas, using the Drude model. The idea is that with an E field in the x ...
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1answer
72 views

Simple questions about reciprocal lattice and brillouin zone

I have few simple questions about Brillouin zone. I will take the example of a 1D lattice with a period of "a". If I have well understood, the reciprocal lattice shows all the point in "k-space" ...
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1answer
60 views

Symmetry and Group theory book

I would like to start learning about symmetries in physics and how they affect physical quantities. As far as I know, the mathematical language that describes symmetries is the Group Theory. So, I ...
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2answers
112 views

Reciprocal lattice and bloch waves

I have a simple question (but I precise that I am very a beginner in solid states physics). I know that the reciprocal vectors have this form : $ ...
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1answer
108 views

Density of states for arbitrary dispersion relation

If I have a 3D dispersion relation $E=E(k_x, k_y, k_z)$ I have an equation for the density of states, which is $D(E)=\frac{1}{\nabla_k E}\int\frac{dS}{(2\pi)^3}$ 1) I am confused about the ...
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1answer
14 views

Why are pressure/potential differences across a barrier measured from inside to outside?

I don't know if I'm asking clearly, but I'm a Medical Student who is trying to intuitively understand pressure differences and electrochemical gradient (across a semipermeable membrane) differences. ...
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51 views

Why are Brillouin zones for graphene and monolayers of transition metal dichalcogenides the same?

The geometrical model of graphene is the flat honeycomb lattice, so the Brillouin zone is also flat honeycomb lattice. However, monolayer of transition metal dichalcogenides is not flat as it consists ...
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Simple Explanation of Kondo Effect

Does anyone have a simple explanation of the Kondo Effect? (i.e. a simple physical picture + maybe equations to think of?) My current understanding is this: If we consider an electron scattering ...