Solid-state physics studies how macroscopic properties of solids (mechanical, electrical, optical, etc.) result from their microscopic structure. It usually deals with the scale where quantum properties of the particles are substantial.

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Photoelectric effect

Why the photoelectric effect is observed only for metals and not for non-metals? Isn't it possible for the photon to release an electron from a non-metal surface?
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semiconductors-band theory [duplicate]

How conduction happens with the conduction band electrons? I mean does the electrons which are responsible for the conduction of holes(by just moving from one atom to other) are those which are ...
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How to understand the simplified tight-binding representation on square lattice?

I have read a paper in this website:http://cmt.nbi.ku.dk/student_projects/bsc/Haider_Moradi_BSc_thesis.pdf I am curious about how to understand the simplified tight-binding representation on square ...
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cicumfernatial vector

Once a sheet of graphite is rolled up into a nanotube, the allowed values of k are constrained by the imposition of periodic boundary conditions along the circumferential direction. this periodic ...
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What is crater's influence on laser ablation?

In many laser ablation experiments (especially Pulsed Laser Deposition), target is moving to avoid crater formation. But I can't find any source that says why it is needed to avoid it. So why is ...
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What is the underlying transport mechanism of electron drift in metals?

The equations involving drift speed, mobility and conductivity, $v_d=\mu E$ and $\sigma=\mu e n$, treat electrons in a Newtonian way. This model works well in practice (at least in macro scale), but I ...
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Quasi-electron lifetime at Dirac (Weyl) point

I would like to know how one should calculate the electron lifetime with chemical potential at the Dirac point from Fermi Golden Rule: \begin{equation} ...
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What are the current carriers in a PN junction?

Imagine a PN junction in forward bias mode. The conventional current goes from the p-side to the n-side. However, as mobile holes move to the n-side, aren't there mobile electrons on the n-side which ...
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What is the difference between Fermi level and Fermi edge?

Just as in title: What is the difference between Fermi level and Fermi edge? My friend makes some research about XPS and he encountered this term. He knows what is Fermi level, but never heard about ...
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For the transition metals, how does counting the number of up-spins and down-spins still give you a non-integer magnetic moment?

The transition metals like Fe, Co and Ni have magnetic moments of 2.2, 1.7 and 0.6 Bohr magnetons, respectively. The band theory says that you get this when you calculate the density-of-states of the ...
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Photon absorption and emission in 2nd quantization

I am looking for models which describe the interaction of matter (lets take a 1D chain of atoms) with photons, especially the emission and absorption. I would love to see the derivation of models in ...
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Why do Weyl points come in pairs in solid state system?

Quoted from "Beyond Band Insulators: Topology of Semi-metals and Interacting Phases" by Turner and Vishwanath: In 3D lattice models, Weyl points always come in pairs of opposite helicity; this ...
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Are deforming force and stress always equal? If they are equal, then why does shape of the body get deformed?

If the deforming force is equal to the restoring force then there is no impact of the deforming force on the body. Then the shape of the body remains constant. How does the body deform, then?
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Numerically evaluating momentum sums

For many-body systems, calculations often involve momentum sums, which are ultimately evaluated numerically for a finite system size $N$. The larger $N$ is, the more accurate the results. Is there ...
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Difference between mechanical modes and phonons

As stated in this review article: Mechanical modes are long compared to the interatomic spacing. It is natural to make the distinction between nanomechanical modes and phonons: The former are ...
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Why are only some materials ferromagnetic? [duplicate]

I've been told in my solid state class, that ferromagnetism occurs when electron spins are alligned. This happens, as I understand it, when it is "energitically favorable" and when the wavefunction is ...
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Why polymeric solids are said to be intermediate between crystalline solids and amorphous solids?

Crystalline solids have ordered arrangement and amorphous solids do not. Polymeric solids are simply formed by the joining of some monomeric units. It has nothing to do with ordered or not ordered ...
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How to escape freeze-out effects of semiconductors in very low temperature

In very low temperature, semiconductors suffer from freeze-out effects. I did see that degenerately doping eliminates freeze-out, but degenerate semiconductors behave like metals. Is/can there ...
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What is ferromagnetism?

Simple question. As far as I've understood it; a ferromagnetic material is one where all the electron spins are alligned parallely - that is, the wavefunction has an antisymmetric spacial part and a ...
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Properties of materials _not_ dependent on fermi surface?

So I'm studying a second solid state physics course where we've covered calculating things like magnetic susceptibility, specific heat and resistivity by considering excitations of electrons around ...
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Why do metals become insulators when oxidized?

I don't know the connection between how forming a new bond with oxygen then changes the density of states to transform the metal into an insulator. It seems like a very powerful transformation.
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Zero Hall coefficient for semiconductors

Is it possible to dope the semiconductors in a way that their hall coefficient is zero?
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Hall coefficient for semiconductors

I read somewhere that hall coefficient for intrinsic semiconductors is zero. But how is that possible because the mobiliities of holes and electrons are never the same?
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What is the relation between Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR)? [duplicate]

It seems to me that the basic principles are exactly the same, right? Then I am puzzled that the former was awarded a nobel prize while the later not. I noticed a similar question here What's the ...
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How do we know that the x-ray pattern is in the reciprocal space? [closed]

I wonder if any one can tell that why do we consider the x-ray pattern (for example, a x-ray pattern on a film for a crystal) in the reciprocal space? (I don't want any explanation about the Ewald ...
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How deep within the sample can the DOS(density of states) be detected by STM(scanning tunnel microscope)?

Using STM equipment, we can get the LDOS(local density of states) on the surface of a sample. I want to know whether the LDOS within the sample(not surface) can be detected by STM. what is the ...
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Is the thermal conductivity of metals affected by magnetic fields?

Especially for a ferromagnet a magnetic field should have a field-induced band shift in the density of states but I wonder if this shift is big enough to be significant and affect the thermal ...
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Is the saturation magnetization of a thin film different if you apply the field at different directions?

I'm getting different values of the saturation magnetization when I measure them in-plane versus out of plane. The saturation magnetization for the out of plane measurement is greater than in the in ...
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Why is the vapor pressure important for people that grow films in high vacuum chambers?

I don't understand what this vapor pressure is. The definition from wikipedia is unclear to me. If I look at two materials and one has a higher vapor pressure than the other, does that mean that the ...
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What is the significance of the Debye temperature from a materials perspctive?

If I look at a table of different metals and their Debye temperatures, what does the variation in these temperatures tell me about these materials?
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Relation between band structure, dispersion, density of states, and the Fermi energy and Fermi level

Despite the long title, this question is mostly qualitative (although I am interested in quantitative results if possible). Say you have an electronic band structure (energy as a function of "k") for ...
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Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculation for metals

Why is DFT not used in calculating electronic structures and properties of metals? I know DFT calculations are not accurate for metallic structures. Can someone explain why?
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Spin flip scattering & Spin dependent scattering [closed]

What causes, i mean the mechanism spin flip scattering & spin independent scattering?
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Band structure and k vectors

If there is a restriction on the allowed states (k vectors) for a system, ie the no of states is equal to twice the number of unit cells in the crystal.. why do we plot k continuously on the x axis? ...
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Why dopant energy levels differ from one material to another?

Dopant levels in Si, Ge and GaAs are very different from each other. Even "similar" materials such as Si and Ge exhibit different dopant energy levels. (source: Pierret, Advanced Semiconductor ...
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What is theMost compressible material commonly found? [closed]

I'd like to know which solid material is highly compressable . I think plastic is widely available and quite compressable. What is something better?
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Elementary introduction to (quantum) hall effect

Where can I find an elementary introduction to classical and quantum hall effect? Only physics I know is some basic quantum mechanics, EM and statistical physics. My goal eventually is to understand ...
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conduction band and free electrons the properties of electrons in conduction band

Do electrons in conduction band consider as free electrons? or they are not completely free? so that we can calculate the distribution function and the density if states ??
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If I know how many atoms I have in a film, can I know the total magnetic moment?

Say I have a Co film and I know its volume so I know the total number of atoms in it. Using this plus the knowledge that each atom has a magnetic moment of 1.7 Bohr magnetons, would the total magnetic ...
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In what cases would using a non-resonant spectroscopy be preferable to using the resonant type?

Here it is mentioned that non-resonant Raman spectroscopy is desirable for avoiding fluorescence and for studying water due to water's low polarizability. How is non-resonant Raman desirable in the ...
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What is the significance of Fermi temperature?

The Fermi temperature of a solid is related to Fermi energy by relation $$ { E }_{ F } ={ k }_{ B }\times{ T }_{ F } $$ where $ { k }_{ B } $ is Boltzman constant. But what is the significance of ...
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Solving Bloch Waves for Potentials with Few Fourier Components

Suppose we have a potential in 1D $$U(x) = 2A\cos(\frac{2\pi}{a} x)$$ Let $G_\alpha$ be reciprocal lattice coordinates $$G_\alpha = \frac{2\pi \alpha}{a},\;\;\;\;\alpha\in \mathbb{Z}$$ As in Ashcroft ...
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Fermi Surfaces meeting

I know the fermi level is the highest energy level in an atom for its electrons and the fermi surface is (in reciprocal space) a sphere of radius fermi level, if that makes sense. So when two ...
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Why Solid Insulators have highest breakdown voltage?

Why does solid insulating materials have a higher breakdown voltage when compared to that of liquids and gases? Can anyone explain this in simple words?
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Particle Hole Transformation of Hamiltonian

The particle hole transformation for a bipartite lattice $\Lambda$ (with sublattices $A$ and $B$) can be written as $$U^\dagger c_{i,\uparrow} U = \epsilon(i) c^\dagger_{i\uparrow} \\ U^\dagger ...
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Sign conventions in Hubbard model

The Hubbard model is often expressed as $$H=-J\sum\limits_{<i,j>} \sum_\sigma c_{i,\sigma}^{\dagger}c_{j,\sigma} +h.c.+U\sum\limits_{i} c_{i,\uparrow}^{\dagger} c_{i,\downarrow}^{\dagger} ...
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What is the mechanism of heat exchange of a bouncing ball?

Imagine a falling ball on a perfectly hard ground. The kinetic energy will be first converted into a deformation of the ball, then the ball will restore it into kinetic and heat energy and recover ...
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Energy magnetization in the presence of temperature and chemical potential gradient

In the following paper (Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 026603) http://journals.aps.org/prl/abstract/10.1103/PhysRevLett.97.026603 the energy magnetization part of the energy current is given in the presence ...
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Valence bands question

I'm currently doing solid state physics and learning about semiconductors. During the course, I have seen a lot of energy/wavevector graphs, like this one (pic from Kittel): I did not have a ...
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Band-gap for solids with isoelectronic atoms

Isoelecronic atoms have same number of electrons but different nuclear charge. It is said that many of the chemical properties of these elements are equal or at least similar. Can I form solids with ...