Solid-state physics studies how macroscopic properties of solids (mechanical, electrical, optical, etc.) result from their microscopic structure. It usually deals with the scale where quantum properties of the particles are substantial.

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Synthesis of Fe-based superconductors

Polycrystal cuprate superconductors are generally prepared by solid state reactions: Starting reagents are in powder form, they are mixed to each other and placed into furnace on high temperature ...
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542 views

Horrifying electron gas model

I am given the Hamiltonian, in an exercise called plasmons, and where $\langle, \rangle $ denotes the expectation value. $$ H = \sum_{k} \varepsilon_k a_k^{\dagger} a_k + \sum_{k_1,k_2,q} V_q ...
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Where does the Berry phase of $\pi$ come from in a topological insulator?

The Berry connection and the Berry phase should be related. Now for a topological insulator (TI) (or to be more precise, for a quantum spin hall state, but I think the Chern parities are calculated in ...
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956 views

Why is the AdS/CFT approach to superconductors rarely cited in condensed matter publications?

Let me put things into perspective by comparing with other applications of string theory. Nowadays review papers written by cosmologists about inflation models often discuss string theory scenarios ...
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943 views

Why do Fermi liquids have T^2 resistivity?

I have often read that metals that are Fermi liquids should have a resistivity that varies with temperature like $\rho(T) = \rho(0) + a T^2 $. I guess the $T^2$ part is the resistance due to ...
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221 views

Topological entanglement entropy only defined for a system in the ground state?

What happens to the topological entanglement entropy of a system, when it is driven out of its groundstate by increasing the temperature?
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171 views

Finding difficulties in taking continuum limit in nonlinear sigma model

I am learning nonlinear sigma model from Assa Auerbach's book "Interacting Electrons and Quantum Magnetism" and getting some difficulties in taking continuum limit. I am following chapter 12: The ...
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207 views

What happens to a Luttinger liquid under time reversal?

Suppose you a have an ordinary Luttinger liquid with $$ H = \int dx \sum _{\eta= \pm 1 , \sigma =\uparrow,\downarrow } \psi^\dagger_{\eta, \sigma} (x) (-i v \eta \partial _x) \psi _{\eta,\sigma} (x). ...
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97 views

Non-Hermiticity when Fourier transforming onto a finite lattice

I'm doing numerical simulations. I have the Haldane model in a honeycomb lattice where $$ H = \sum \limits_{<ij>}a^\dagger_i b_j + h.c $$ Where $i$ belongs to sublattice $A$, and $j$ to ...
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39 views

In what circumstances, can exchange interaction acquire temperature dependence?

Heisenberg exchange interaction (sometimes called as magnetic stiffness?), originating from the Coulomb interaction and the Fermion statistics, is widely used in theories of magnetism. Conventionally, ...
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41 views

Can the occupation of Floquet bands be calculated from the Keldysh Green's function?

A periodically driven band structure can be semiclassically described by Floquet theory, resulting in photon-dressed Floquet bands (non-equilibrium steady states). Usually, for non-equilibrium ...
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78 views

Dispersion of light in metals and the plasma frequency

I've been reading about the dielectric function and plasma oscillations recently and I encountered the following dispersion relation for EM waves in metals or in plasma (Is it correct to treat those ...
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56 views

Is it possible to have a line rather than a point where the three states of a substance can exist?

Most of us are familiar with state diagrams that define which of the three states a substance will take given the pressure and temperature. And that some substances, such as water for example, exhibit ...
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75 views

What is the origin of the “polarization catastophe”?

According to the Clausius-Mossotti relation, $$ \frac{\epsilon_r - 1}{\epsilon_r + 2}=\frac{n\alpha}{3\epsilon_0} $$ So when $n\alpha = 3\epsilon_0$, the relative permittivity $\epsilon_r$ ...
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46 views

Energy dependence of integrating dosimeters

The graph shows the relative response of a dosimeter at different energies, normalized to 1.25 MeV Co-60 gamma rays. Curve A is the graph of the equation $$ ...
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198 views

Where does an LED use energy other than emitting light?

I have a quantum formula describing what kind of photon should be emitted by an LED depending on its voltage. Of course the colour is depending on the material, but every type of LED also needs its ...
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35 views

What material could be used to study magnetic phase transitions in a college laboratory exercise?

I am working to develop a simple laboratory exercise in solid state physics to be conducted by fourth year students of physics. The idea of the exercise is for the student to get some experience in ...
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64 views

What is the the real world interpretation of the high dimensionality of quasicrystals?

One of the examples of the problems of 5-fold symmetry is that pentagons tiled on a 2D plane do not completely fill that plane, leaving voids. This may be solved by "folding" it into 3D space, and ...
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146 views

About SU(2) gauge symmetry of the large U limit of the Hubbard model

I have been studying about the SU(2) symmetry in Heisenberg Hamiltonian with a paper 'SU(2) gauge symmetry of the large U limit of the Hubbard model' written by Ian Affleck et al(Phys. Rev. B 38, 745 ...
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462 views

How should I think about reciprocal lattice and Miller indices?

When I hear someone talking about a (100) plane or a (111) plane or an (hkl) in general, my first thought is, is the system cubic. The reason I think this is because I tend NOT to think of the planes ...
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581 views

Simple model of edge states for a two-dimensional topological insulator

Quantum spin Hall states or, topological insulators are novel states of matter that have insulating bulk and gapless edge states. Are there any simple models that show these features? See e.g. the ...
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125 views

Qualitative argument to determine energy of defects

In a book of "LES HOUCHES - Critical Phenomena, Random systems, Gauge theories" the author Frolich says that: 2D In two dimensions, the mean energy of an isolated point defect in a square area of ...
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49 views

In what cases would using a non-resonant spectroscopy be preferable to using the resonant type?

Here it is mentioned that non-resonant Raman spectroscopy is desirable for avoiding fluorescence and for studying water due to water's low polarizability. How is non-resonant Raman desirable in the ...
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32 views

Landau levels in ferromagnets

Consider a spontaneously magnetised (uniformly) conducting ferromagnet. Now suppose that there is no external magnetic field. The question is as follows: will the motion of electrons be quantized via ...
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What are the key differences between a Wigner crystal and charge density wave?

We know that Wigner crystal is a crystal formed due to interaction(kinetic energy is quenched). It is a crystal of electrons and therefore has periodical oscillations in the charge density. Therefore ...
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101 views

Does the Mermin-Wagner theorem forbid superconductivity in the 2D Hubbard-Model?

"In the 2D Hubbard model (two spatial dimensions) the Mermin-Wagner theorem does not allow a phase transition." I am quite illiterate concerning this theorem and hearsay. Does the theorem apply to a ...
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48 views

Definition of luminescence

I saw a definition of luminescence as "any light not resulting from blackbody radiation", but in my view it's too broad. Is an accelerating electron producing luminescence? Or an electron recombining ...
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85 views

About the definition of the spin current

People have been talking about the spin current for a while. But there is a fundamental problem. Unlike charge, or mass, spin is not conserved. Let us take the 1d spin-1/2 Heisenberg chain as an ...
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53 views

Interpretation of the diode constant in a LED

For a real diode the current as function of the potential difference between its terminals (for big enough voltage) is given by: $$I=A e^{\frac{eV-E}{\eta k_B T}} \tag{1}$$ So in the case of LEDs ...
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56 views

Spectroscopy from a classical light wave or photon only?

In chemistry we mostly regard light/electromagnetic radiation as a beam of particles or photons. This is a very useful model to explain molecular excitations and ionisations from quantum interactions. ...
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59 views

How can I calculate the character table for double group in spin-orbit interaction

When I read the book(Group theory: application to condensed matter physics) page 347, I found I don't know how to derive the new irreducible representations in the double group.
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Why does Pressure Increase the Tc (Critical Temperature) of a Superconductor?

Just a heads up - please make this answer understandable to around 1st year degree level physics - not PhD research. So I can understand it - thanks. I was wondering why they Critical Temperature ...
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210 views

How to compute matsubara frequency summation over computer?

Matsubara frequency sum usually takes the following form: $S_\eta = \frac{1}{\beta}\sum_{i\omega_n} g(i\omega_n).$ But in my problem, $g(i\omega_n)$ is a lengthy expression, which can not be ...
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Does the real part of the inverse dielectric function have to be negative at some point for Cooper pairs to form?

Electrons naturally repel one another. However, in a superconductor, a phonon-mediated interaction causes the electrons to have a weak attractive interaction. Suppose that the interaction between two ...
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142 views

Convention in physics for [],{} and operators (QM)

I got a little mixed up with the convention in physics. Usually a hat means an operator. For a given electron-ion Hamiltonian $\hat{H}_{e-n}$, what are the difference between these: 1) ...
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36 views

In k$\cdot$p theory, how does one calculate the bulk inversion asymmetry coefficients given in table 6.3 in Winkler?

In k$\cdot$p theory, how does one calculate the bulk inversion asymmetry coefficients given in table 6.3 in Winkler? Winkler's book on spin-orbit coupling effects is available free online. In ...
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529 views

What is the Fermi energy of (undoped) graphene?

All of the sources I have found for this online have been wildly unclear. Many use the phrase "Fermi energy" to refer to the "Fermi level" (which is emphatically not what I'm looking for; I want the ...
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113 views

Force constant of metals - Kohn anomaly

In Introduction to Solid State Physics (Kittel), it assumed the force constant between plane $s$ and $s+p$ $C_p=A\frac{\sin pk_0a}{pa}$ in metals to represent a Kohn anomaly. It says such a form is ...
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190 views

Pseudocubic unit cells: how to construct one?

I keep coming across the term pseudocubic unit cell while reading about orthorhombic perovskite structures. No clear explanation ...
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54 views

How Does The Macroscopic Wavefunction Build Up?

How does the macroscopic wavefunction (the order parameter) builds up from zero value to the a finite value when liquid He undergoes a transition from normal to the superfluid state? How does it ...
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75 views

Uncertainty principle characterizing metallic bonding?

So I was trying to think through the statement that the uncertainty principle can characterize metallic bonding. I know that the uncertainty principle is: $\Delta p \Delta x = \frac{\hbar}{2}$. And ...
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88 views

Does the Fermi sea have plane waves, or wave packets?

Consider a zero-temperature, one-dimensional crystal with allowed electron momenta $k_n = \frac{2\pi n}{L}$. Question: Which is the more correct way to think about the Fermi sea? Sharp plane ...
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355 views

Derivation of existence of energy band gap in semiconductor (solid State)

I am looking for both a mathematical and a physical reason for energy band gap in metals. For Physical reason, I was told that at each reciprocal lattice, you could have Bragg scattering, that would ...
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106 views

Fermi Energy and the Electric Potential

In an extrinsic semiconductor the electric potential is: $$\phi = \frac{1}{q}(E_{\mathrm{F}} - E_{\mathrm{Fi}})$$ where $E_{\mathrm{F}}$ is the Fermi energy, $E_{\mathrm{Fi}}$ is the intrinsic Fermi ...
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152 views

The origin of contact noise?

I was trying to measure the noise of a device with metal probes. I was not sure whether I should trust the results because I was told contact noise might contribute to some degree. I am a little ...
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94 views

Thermal expansion and conductivity

When thinking about how the lattice constant of silicon can be given up to eight decimal places without a remark for the temperature I realized that, it seems most insulators and semiconductors seem ...
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145 views

Typical time scales for spin dynamics and lattice vibrations in magnetic solids

In a paper from the 1990s ([1]) on magnetovolume effects in ferromagnets, it is written that in most real situations, the moment (or spin) autocorrelation time is much larger than the period for ...
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305 views

Hall effect with similar positive and negative carriers?

The Hall effect includes the transverse (to the flow of current) electric field set up by the charges which accumulate on the edges, to counter the magnetic component of the Lorentz force acting on ...
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148 views

Brillouin Zones in a nanowire

My professor told me something I didn't understand the other day: I was reading a paper on a crystalline nanowire (NW), and in the paper they look at how the band structure changes (from that of the ...
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111 views

The boundary between polycrystalline and crystalline

My current understanding of solid crystalline-like materials (please correct me if I'm wrong!) is that it is a continuum in terms of crystallinity, from amorphous (basically no periodicity) to single ...