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7 views

How to calculate a Mooney-Rivlin material

Well, I'm working on a fsi (fluid-solid/structure interaction) model. I've got ready the fluid part, now I need to get ready the solid part. Since I'm working with tissues, I need to use an ...
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2answers
20 views

What is the meaning of pre-tension for a stiff membrane?

On one hand, I know that the tighter a drum head is stretched, the higher its natural frequencies. This relation is given by: $$f_{ij}=\frac{k_{ij}}{2\pi R}\sqrt{\frac{T_0}{h\rho}}$$ where $k_{ij}$ ...
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0answers
15 views

Can an axisymmetric solution produce antisymmetric eigenfunctions?

I'm solving a vibrating membrane. In order to simplify my calculations, it's tempting to assume axisymmetric behaviour. If I solve an axisymmetric problem, am I going to lose all the antisymmetric ...
3
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3answers
80 views

Why rubber is incompressible material?

Why rubber is incompressible material? I know its Poisson's ratio is nearing to 0.5. So I don't understand physically, what it means by 0.5 Poisson's ratio and incompressibility. When I tried ...
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0answers
55 views

Are there any known (closed form even if approximate) solutions to problems in relativistic elasticity?

There are several useful known solutions to the EFE with relatively simple / trivial stress-energy-momentum tensor, such as the Schwarzschild solution. Despite the idealizations made therein they are ...
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1answer
81 views

Why plane stress condition is taken for thin plates

Why plane stress is taken for thin plates? It says in the books that the stress variation is small for thin components and is close to zero. Why is that so? Also why stress at free surface is zero? ...
2
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1answer
87 views

Hookes Law and Objective Stress Rates

Often, in papers presenting updated Lagrangian simulation methods for solid dynamics, the following procedure for updating the (Cauchy) stress tensor is presented: First, the Cauchy stress tensor is ...
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0answers
59 views

Creep of materials at atomic/molecular level under stresses

Do the viscoelastic materials creep at the same rate under three types of fundamental stresses, viz.- TENSION, COMPRESSION and SHEAR??? My intuition tells me that the answer is no. But, I can't get ...
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0answers
74 views

Volumetric and Deviatoric Strain Equation in 2D

Strain is defined as $$\epsilon=\frac{1}{2}\left( \nabla u + \nabla u^T\right).$$ I found a formula for the strain tensor in 3D decomposed into volumetric and deviatoric components: $$\epsilon= v + ...
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0answers
31 views

What is the criterion of stability of thick-walled spherical shell?

Is there the formula (if someone already has discovered it) or what is the algorithm (if a particular formula was not deduced), to calculate the critical pressure of thick-walled spherical shell $−$ ...
2
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1answer
63 views

Out-of-Plane Phonons

I am trying to derive the out-of-plane phonon dispersion relation for a membrane. As far as I can tell, one of the simplest ways to do so is with a Lagrangian of the form: ...
0
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2answers
101 views

Potential energy of an infinitesimal length of elastic rod

I am having an embarrassingly hard time with the derivation for the potential energy of an infinitesimal element of an elastic rod of area A. The picture shown below is an element of the rod that has ...
8
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3answers
262 views

Continuum limit for solid mechanics

Is there a rigorous derivation of the limits for continuum properties in solid mechanics? For instance, the stress-strain relationship may be linear for large samples (the slope being the Young's ...
0
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1answer
327 views

Limits of Poisson's ratio in isotropic solid

For an isotropic solid, Poisson's ratio can be expressed in terms of stiffness constants as: $$\sigma = \frac{c_{11} - 2c_{44}}{2c_{11} - 2c_{44}}$$ Alternatively we may express Poisson's ratio in ...
2
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0answers
35 views

Simple model of fiber interaction for pressurized braided tubes

I am trying the understand the failure modes of braided tubes containing high pressure gas. Here is an example of such a braid with a variable radius: The tubes have an internal liner for sealing ...
0
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2answers
295 views

Compression and expansion

Why is it that solids on compression [As in striking a hammer etc.] heat up, but liquids and gases on compression [Pressurizing liquids causes them to freeze or gases to liquify] cool down? Can ...
0
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1answer
178 views

Area moment of inertia of regular $n$-gons over polygon center $O$

Is it possible to consider the regular polygons ($n$-gons) as deformed circles and use a pseudo-polar coordinate system to calculate their moment of inertia over its center $O$. Inasmuch as I know (I ...
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0answers
46 views

Movement of a gyroscope with non-fixed axis

Assume one has a gyroscope rotating around an axis with both ends leaning on a dedicated semiplane as shown on the picture below. There is no friction either between the rotor and the axis or between ...
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1answer
103 views

What is the $n$ in the formula in Solid Mechanics? [closed]

The formula is about the critical force for the elastic beam that is supported by its joints: $$ P_{cr} ~=~ n^2 \pi^2 \frac{EI}{ L^2} $$ It should be based on the book Parnes - Solid ...
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1answer
235 views

What is physics of Collision between solid and liquid (or gas)? [closed]

My mind has been busy recently by this question: What is physics of Collision between solid and liquid (or gas)? What is Conservation law's of such Collision? Why, when we drop a solid object in ...
2
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0answers
217 views

Mechanics of Materials (pressure and temperature)

A solid right cylinder of rock core is surrounded by four rods made of mild steel (all-thread rods). The rods are placed equidistantly around the core in a square formation. The tops and bottoms of ...
0
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1answer
64 views

Does 'maximum principal stress fracture criteria' only apply in tensile loading?

I'm working on 3d simulation of solid fracture, primarily for graphics applications. I have one question about the Rankine fracture criteria, which is widely used in the computer graphics community. ...
3
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2answers
306 views

Determination of mass density distribution of an object

This is a follow-up to a previous question How can you weigh your own head in an accurate way?. My purpose is not to restart the flurry of more or less humorous jokes (which are not such a bad thing ...
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1answer
149 views

Deformation due to isostatic compression

When loading a solid material in the shape of a cylinder in isostatic compression, what is the relationship for the change in length versus change in diameter? For example. If I know that when I ...
2
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1answer
39 views

Organs & Oscillations: An Analysis on the Temperature Dynamics of Solids

Does temperature have an influence on the frequency of an oscillating organ pipe?
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0answers
802 views

Materials with Zero Poisson Ratio

Poisson's ratio is defined as negative ratio between transverse and axial strain. So, a material with zero poisson ratio must necessarily exhibit no transverse strain. After checking the wikipedia, ...
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1answer
88 views

Modeling elastic moduli as a continuous function in space for a single solid material

I've read a number of solid mechanics papers where a single material is modeled with constant elastic moduli (lame parameters $\lambda$, $\mu$). I've also seen composite materials modeled with ...
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1answer
279 views

Interpretation of lame parameters in solid mechanics

I think I have a pretty good understanding of the physical interpretation of young's modulus $E$ and poisson ratio $\nu$ in solid mechanics. However, I often find in mathematical papers that the ...
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1answer
776 views

Why doesn't a bus blow due to internal pressure?

When one travels in a bus, if he's sitting at any window, he will feel that the air is coming inside. If someone is standing at the open door of the bus, he'll also feel that the air is coming ...
2
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1answer
901 views

How to interpret the constraints on Poisson's ratio values, physically?

If I'm not mistaken, a Young's modulus $E$ can theoretically take on any positive value without bound. Physically, I interpret this as though a solid can have any arbitrary "stiffness" (within the ...
2
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1answer
134 views

Equivalence of turbulence in solid materials

The governing equations for a fluid and a solid are effectively the same and many times analysis can be done for a solid using the Navier-Stokes equations with the equation of state and/or the stress ...
4
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3answers
401 views

Does zero strain always imply zero stress?

In solid mechanics, can I always assume that if an object undergoes no strain, then no stress is applied to it? I think it's true only because I can't seem to find a counter-example.
0
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1answer
170 views

Why are momentum balance equations formulated in terms of net stress rather than net force?

In engineering, a steady state equilibrium force balance is typically expressed as $$\nabla\cdot \sigma=0$$ where $\sigma$ is the stress (force per unit area) applied at a point. It seems more ...
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1answer
445 views

Definition of quasi-static assumption

I'm reading this paper, where atop pg 3, the author mentions the "quasi-static" assumption for earth displacements which leads to the mechanical deformation of a fluid-solid system to be governed by: ...
2
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1answer
313 views

What is the spatial derivative of strain tensor?

I'm looking for a metric that contains enough information of a 3D solid's deformation: stretch, bend and twist, etc. Stretch, bend and twist may be ambiguous for a 3D solid, since unlike a rod, it ...
0
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1answer
157 views

what to use for mass in a 2D FEM simulation

I am trying to find the energy of a wave travelling through a solid material in a 2D Finite Element Method (FEM) - Simulation. As a general approach I would try to use $E_{kin}=\frac{1}{2}mv^2$ at ...
3
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1answer
1k views

Formulas for compressibility of solids

I am taking a course in mechanics this semester, as well as a course in reservoir physics. Both courses have sections devoted to pressure/compressibility of solids, but the formulas look slightly ...
1
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1answer
2k views

How thick does steel have to be to be able to withstand 300 bar (sphere)

How thick does the material in a sphere have to be to withstand the (inner)pressure of 300 bar if the material is steel? (With an inner-radius of 2cm) Atmosphere pressure = same as 0 meter above sea ...
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2answers
2k views

Why and how is sound produced when two objects hit each other?

When two objects collide and undergo a partially inelastic collision (so every one we experience in every-day life), they rebound to a certain degree, but kinetic energy is not conserved. Thus, the ...
2
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1answer
108 views

Why are rebar grooved?

Just what the title states, please. Iron reinforcement bars used to provide the framework over which concrete solidifies always appear to bear grooves. Do the grooves behave as the thread of a screw ...
4
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1answer
245 views

How to write classical dynamics of solids in tensor form (relation of stiffness and viscosity tensor)?

This is a question about dynamics. If I have understood correctly there should be a tensor that describes the dynamics of a (solid?) body (= viscosity ?). I mean, tensor that includes the time ...