Questions that ask about some aspect of physics research or study which doesn't involve the actual physics. In general, soft questions can be answered without using physical reasoning.

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2answers
82 views

What is the opposite of quantization?

Is the opposite of quantization just taking the limit $h \rightarrow 0$ ? Or are there more steps involved (maybe related to bosons and fermions?)? How would one call the the opposite of quantization? ...
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1answer
43 views

If you play more than one music track at once on a computer, does the sound heard get louder?

Say you are using a computer and have multiple Youtube videos playing music (or any other video) at the same time, does the sound produced by the computer's speakers (or a pair of headphones) become ...
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2answers
121 views

Statistical mechanics vs. many-body theory

Where is the basic difference of statistical mechanics with many-body physics? What are the systems which cannot be studied in statistical mechanics but in many body theory? After all we know ...
6
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2answers
2k views

Popular books on QM

After some discussions with my friend about some "popular" aspects of quantum mechanics, my friend asked me whether there exist any books that could convey the basic ideas in a non-technical way (my ...
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1answer
102 views

Conversion of energy to matter or antimatter?

We all know that matter converts into energy, but will energy convert into matter? Does it form antimatter by converting? Illustrate me with example.
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2answers
1k views

Sources to learn about Greens functions

For a physics major, what are the best books/references on Greens functions for self-studying? My mathematical background is on the level of Mathematical Methods in the physical sciences by Mary ...
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6answers
2k views

Recommended progression with which to learn physics for fun

I enjoy reading up on new topics in physics and astronomy, and learning the concepts and ideas in the major theories, like relativity and quantum mechanics. Unfortunately, one thing that I lack ...
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0answers
22 views

Why is Bohr's explanation called Bohr's model and not Bohr's theory?

I have seen an answer which tells the difference between model (specific) and a theory (general). And it makes sense 'coz Bohr explained it for the hydrogen atom only. But did he not make a set of ...
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3answers
2k views

Physics book for 15 year old boy [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: List of good classical physics books my name is Bruno Alano. As stated in the title, I'm 15 years old (I'll do 16 on 7 of Feb) and much love Computer Science (C, C++), ...
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1answer
493 views

Please recommend a physics problems book similar to Demidovich [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Graduate Physics Problems Books Does anyone have recommendation for a physics problems collection book (series) that is similar to Demidovich's A Collection of Problems ...
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4answers
533 views

Books on Hilbert space and phase space?

Can you recommend books or papers that highlight or discuss extensively, or at least more than average, the similarites/differences between phase space and Hilbert space? I am primarily interested in ...
2
votes
2answers
9k views

Best physics olympiad resources [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Book recommendations I am looking for good book recommendations at the level of high-school physics. I am having in mind to find out as to what are the typical books ...
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1answer
73 views

Understanding this metaphor involving e-mails, chaos and phase transitions [closed]

I asked this question on the English Stack Exchange and people advised to try get the answer here. I can’t get the idea of metaphor in the last sentence of the following quote: Instead, email ...
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2answers
339 views

Searching books and papers with equations

Sometimes I may come up with an equation in mind, so I want to search for the related material. It may be the case that I learn it before but forget the name, or, there is no name for the equation ...
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3answers
4k views

Forces on a ball thrown upwards

When a ball is thrown up in upward direction, it is said that force is in downward direction. Why we don't we consider the force given to the ball to throw up in the upward direction? Is there is no ...
1
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1answer
40 views

Will an Electrical Engineering Minor give me a significant advantage in experimental physics? [closed]

I'm currently choosing courses to complete in my university degree (science) and thought completing some basic electrical engineering may be useful if I go into academic experimental physics research. ...
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1answer
71 views

Why is there empirical evidence in physics more than an analytic evidence? [closed]

In case of mathematics, you can make your own rules and play with them. For example, Euclied made his own rule of Eucledian geometry, and Reiman (or other Non-Eucledian geometers) made their own rule ...
14
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3answers
2k views

Can we tell when an established theory is wrong?

I was reading the following answer from this question: In physics, you cannot ask / answer why without ambiguity. Now, we observe that the speed of light is finite and that it seems to be the ...
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1answer
29 views

How do we call in English scientific terms the Fermat's principle about back and forth light traversal?

We know that the path followed by the light from point A to point B is independent of the direction of propagation of light. This is what is called in French "le principe de retour inverse de la ...
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1answer
458 views

Reference Request: Classical Mechanics with Symplectic Reduction

I am trying to find a supplement to appendix of Cushman & Bates' book on Global aspects of Classical Integrable Systems, that is less terse and explains mechanics with Lie groups (with dual of Lie ...
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1answer
59 views

Dot product and divergence [closed]

Divergence is represented by dot product. How is the divergence related to dot product? And curl is represented by cross product. How is the curl related to cross product?
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4answers
4k views

Help an aspiring physicists what to self-study [closed]

This is probably not the kind of question you'll often encounter on this forum, but I think a bit of background is needed for this question to make sense and not seem like a duplicate: 2012 has been ...
1
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0answers
42 views

What type of physicist studies quantum physics the most? [closed]

I want to become a physicist, and I am particularly interested in quantum physics. I know quantum physics has applications in many branches of physics. Condensed matter physicists use it among others. ...
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0answers
90 views

Which scientist is this?

Okay so I was watching discovery channel, in that i saw a man cleaning live electric wires of 10k volts in the air, he was not touching the ground. They said he was able to do this because of the ...
3
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0answers
93 views

My bathroom door stays open in summer [closed]

My bathroom door remains open in summer, but in the winter it stays about halfway between fully open (90 degree angle, against a window) and closed. The door is between bedroom and bathroom and it is ...
3
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2answers
58 views

Computational advantages of various notations for electromagnetism [closed]

Most undergraduate electromagnetism classes and textbooks use vector notation to describe Maxwell's equations. However, there are other notations like differential geometry and geometric calculus ...
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0answers
20 views

Classical Mechanics Resources [duplicate]

I hope that my question doesn't violate the posting rules. I was wondering if any of you have any resources (websites, books, etc.) for classical mechanics. My first week of classical mechanics has ...
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2answers
334 views

Correct terminology for combined kinematic and dynamic state

The kinematic state is defined as the position and orientation in space. The dynamic state is defined as the associated velocities. What is the correct terminology for the combined kinematic and ...
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3answers
279 views

Is net work and total work same?

According to my text book Total Work = Delta Kinetic Energy = KEf - KEi But then work is defined to be dot product of Force (vector) and Displacement (vector). Also to my knowledge work is ...
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1answer
246 views

Wormholes and the illusion of time?

I was watching a video on Youtube by Brian Greene, "the illusion of time."http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j-u1aaltiq4 In that video, he introduces to me the idea of a "brane," or a slice of the ...
1
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1answer
86 views

What defines a physical property? [closed]

The physical world around us has all sorts of properties, shape, color etc. If you move on to more complex systems, there are even more like some emotional properties etc. Why do we deem only ...
5
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5answers
364 views

How to find references from publications in the physics literature?

Coming from Computer Science, I'm a bit puzzled about the format of references in physics publications. They usually lack a title, which I'm usually using to locate a publication online (for obtaining ...
2
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1answer
179 views

When was the first time that superconducting quasiparticles were called Majorana fermions?

Since a number of years, the field of superconductivity has a growing obsession with Majorana fermions. I wonder how far back we can go: When was the first time that superconducting quasiparticles ...
5
votes
4answers
804 views

Physics after a Theory of Everything [closed]

There is a lot of controversy over the existence of a Theory of Everything (ToE), and as far as I know, we are a long way from having a possible candidate. But what interests me is, what after that? ...
3
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0answers
35 views

How exactly are the relative strengths of gravity and electromagnetism quantified? [duplicate]

I've often heard it said that gravity is much weaker than electromagnetism, and after looking at several questions on SE, I feel that I've got at least a qualitative handle on the concept -- gravity ...
2
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2answers
195 views

How is everything a field?

I've heard before that everything in physics can be thought of as either a field, or its excitation. Is there some intuitive explanation of how I can look at gravity, light, electromagnetism, etc as a ...
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2answers
100 views

What are some “I wish someone had parted that wisdom onto me” tips for beginning a bachelor's degree in Physics? [closed]

I start classes next Monday for Physics and I am beyond nervous. I don't really know what to expect in the big world of upper-level science. Granted, I'm only going for an Undergrad right now, but I'm ...
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0answers
24 views

Good book to self learn physics from beginner level [duplicate]

I am looking for a book that is similar to the Gelfand books on Algebra or Trigonometry. These really help the reader understand the material. Any recommendations for a similar book for physics?
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3answers
2k views

Equation of everything

Is this equation in the image true? Can you give some topics that I can cover the equation? Similar equation from http://www.preposterousuniverse.com:
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0answers
43 views

Why do many equations need squared powers? [duplicate]

It seems that an equation factor must be “squared” as a convenient approximation to balance out some other series of factors invisibly . Might $E=mc^{1.95}$ work as well as $E=mc^2$? Might ...
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0answers
24 views

Types of research problems [closed]

I got curious about the general types of research problems which one encounters in theoretical and mathematical physics like.... Creating new laws out of data like Dirac or Einstein. Considering a ...
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1answer
92 views

How do hotel peepholes only work in one direction?

Basically the title. Light can go into my room through some lenses so that I can see it, but light can't escape my room so that people outside? The article about peepholes on Wikipedia doesn't ...
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1answer
46 views

Difference between escape velocity and speed [duplicate]

What is the difference between escape velocity and escape speed , is their any error if we use them interchangeably?
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1answer
79 views

Why does the symbol have an arrow? [closed]

What does the arrow in the symbol mean? Does it mean that it is a variable voltmeter and ammeter?
3
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1answer
179 views

Worthington jets explanation: fluid phenomenon

I don't understand the reason behind the formation of Worthington jets I've been reading a bit about Worthington jets Video 1, this phenomenon is caused when something is thrown to the water as we ...
3
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0answers
79 views

What depth of learning must be achieved to sufficently understand advanced physics topics? [closed]

I was recently asked the following question by a friend of mine who is an undergraduate mathematics student, and I thought it would be beneficial to see what the members here have to say about it, as ...
0
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1answer
52 views

How can I properly learn relativity with an electrical engineering background? [closed]

I want to properly learn the theory of relativity, purely for self-interest. When I say relativity, I mean both flavours: special and general. Are there any good books which go into both the ...
1
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0answers
35 views

Frozen water cooler bottle [closed]

My water bottle for my water cooler is frozen. Should I place it onto the water cooler while it is frozen, wait till it thaws a bit, or wait till it thaws completely?
4
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2answers
899 views

Is a quark bomb possible?

I am wondering about the possibility of making a bomb out of the binding energy of quarks inside hadrons. I know that about confinement and all that, but I wonder if there is a way to harness this ...