Questions that ask about some aspect of physics research or study which doesn't involve the actual physics. In general, soft questions can be answered without using physical reasoning.

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2answers
161 views

Newton's third Law?

Third law: When one body exerts a force on a second body, the second body simultaneously exerts a force equal in magnitude and opposite in direction to that of the first body. Newton's third ...
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1answer
149 views

Notation in Quantum Mechanics

When we write equations in QM, in certain places, the wave function is represented as $\psi(x,t)$, which is the wave function in position space, and in some other places, it is written as $\Psi(t)$. ...
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1answer
115 views

I am looking for 'Programming+Electronics+ Physics' field [closed]

I wish to pursue a career that somehow involves programming, electronics, and physics. What are such careers? Also, I have heard of some 1 year post-graduate diplomas/courses for specialization in ...
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0answers
29 views

References requested on departments with recitation sessions

What physics departments offer recitation sessions for their physics courses on the undergraduate level? If there is a site which has such info it will be greatly appreciated.
3
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4answers
305 views

how long do large hadron collider experiments take?

This travel stackexchange answer has kinda got me wondering... how long do experiments involving the large hadron collider usually take? I'd expect you run it for a few seconds and bam - higgs boson ...
1
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0answers
190 views

Introductory exercise set with solutions for string theory

I am trying to self-study string theory, beginning with Ibanez and Uranga (String Theory and Particle Physics). Unfortunately, the book contains no problems, so I'm not sure whether I am fully ...
0
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1answer
163 views

Proper name for a thermodynamic process with constant internal energy $U$

Back in the day I learned that a few special thermodynamical processes have special names. For example, if one keeps $P$ constant, the process is called isobaric, if one keeps $T, V$ or $S$ ...
1
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2answers
1k views

Math and Theoretical Physics Topics & Textbook for Self-Study [duplicate]

I am from Singapore, a civil engineering graduate and I've graduated from university in 2009. Throughout my school days I've been interested in Physics, unfortunately I was not accepted into the ...
1
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1answer
127 views

How did neodymium magnets get their name?

Like in the question. Why neodymium magnets (Nd2Fe14B) are called "neodymium magnets"? Why not boron magnets? Or iron magnets?
1
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0answers
112 views

Good book on deriving approximate solutions from first principles? [closed]

I have always been excited by examples in which a few simple assumptions and first principles are used to characterize a system. For example, I did an exercise in which Crawford estimates a lake to ...
2
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1answer
134 views

Book Recommendation- Classical Relativistic Fields

My bare bookshelves are crying out for the addition of a new family member, more specifically a book: Discussing the classical Klein-Gordon field, spinor fields, gauge fields and all other matter ...
3
votes
1answer
201 views

What to consider before taking a physics course (given a mathematical background)? [closed]

I'm a Computer Engineering major, but when I was in high school I was a very poor student. I didn't pay attention and I didn't think I was capable of succeeding in classes like Math and Science so I ...
6
votes
4answers
190 views

How can one make sure that one had understood the material studied? [closed]

I do not fully understand the process of understanding of a material one reads. Suppose someone reads a chapter from a physics book. How does one make sure that one had really understood what she/he ...
3
votes
0answers
373 views

A gentle introduction to CFT [closed]

Which is the definition of a conformal field theory? Which are the physical prerequisites one would need to start studying conformal field theories? (i.e Does one need to know supersymmetry? Does one ...
6
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2answers
811 views

How important is mathematical proof in physics?

How important are proofs in physics? If something is mathematically proven to follow from something we know is true, does it still require experimental verification? Are there examples of things that ...
2
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0answers
119 views

Why supra-conductivity became super-conductivity?

The original article by the Kamerlingh Onnes team in Leiden does not give a name to the new effect: Kamerlingh Onnes, H. Further experiments with liquid helium. C. On the change of electric ...
2
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1answer
88 views

Large object is pushed through a small wormhole, what happens?

A simple question about wormholes: What happens if a large object is pushed through a much smaller wormhole? For example, what happens if I push an elephant through a palm-sized wormhole? My intuition ...
0
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0answers
34 views

Have there been more distinctive names suggested for neutrino mass states $\nu_1, \nu_2, \nu_3$?

The different mass states of neutrinos are generally named $\nu_1, \nu_2, \nu_3$. By comparison, the names of quark mass states (up, ...
2
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1answer
221 views

Why are lab Magnets painted red?

Wy are lab magnets painted red in color? I tried searching everywhere but couldn't get a satisfactory answer.
7
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4answers
962 views

Why is the Copenhagen interpretation of quantum physics the most widely accepted one?

I've been digging a lot into quantum physics in the last few weeks. I didn't care much about the maths, just about what empirically happens to get a conceptual idea about quantum phenomena. The most ...
1
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1answer
112 views

Negligible Mass String

I've recently been working through a lot of physics problems and a lot of them say to assume that the mass of the string used in a problem involving a pulley, for example, is negligible. Why is this ...
1
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0answers
46 views

Benefits of the sign convention for electrons?

Benjamin Franklin considered electrons to be positive, but J.J. Thompson considered them negative. We obviously went with J.J. Thompson's convention. Why? What were the benefits of moving to J.J. ...
0
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3answers
291 views

How do 3D glasses work?

I am really curious as how do 3D glasses work. I know that they uses some kind of circular polarizers but how does this actually make the screen jump right out at you?
6
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2answers
156 views

Historical reason behind using $ν$ instead of $f$ to stand for frequency in the equation $E=hν$?

Normally, we use the letter $f$ to stand for frequency in equations. $$T = 1/f$$ $$v = \lambda f$$ $$Φ +E_k = h f$$ So I'm curious as why the letter $ν$ (nu) is used to represent frequency in the ...
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0answers
77 views

Why are there no explicit calculations in some articles

I am always baffled how in all the articles (theoretical ones), there is no explicit calculations, or at least some reference how to find it, or where to find it (the calculation). I get that, for ...
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votes
1answer
432 views

In truth, only atoms and the void

I have a question about this motto used by Sean Carroll in his blog: In truth, only atoms and the void. Can you explain what this sentence means? My interpretation is that the sentence does ...
1
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1answer
86 views

Obtaining a measurement very indirectly [closed]

While answering a question I came to reflect on the fact that in science experimental setups measure things indirectly. Example: the setup of the Pound-Rebka experiment. The amount of absorption was ...
8
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2answers
93 views

Can I use two SI prefexes

Is it ok to say $145\,{\rm k\,MPa}$ for $145\, {\rm GPa}$. We are so used to comparing stresses in ${\rm MPa}$ that I want to keep things relative to this unit. So would it be a no-no to do so.
3
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3answers
309 views

Why is gas(oline) in gas stations sold by volume (as opposed to mass)?

Fluids (including natural gasoline/petroleum) have variable volume based on the ambient temperature for the same mass of fluid. So, really, the amount of gas that you're filling your car with depends ...
1
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0answers
80 views

Beginner projects in NMR quantum computing [closed]

I have applied for a summer project in NMR quantum computing as I want to learn this field, but my professor wants me to tell him the project title. I have no idea about the field and what projects ...
1
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0answers
57 views

Present experimental status of Moffat's Modified theory of Gravity

Modified theories of Gravity have been discussed before in this 2-year old question, Are modified theories of gravity credible? I was going through Moffat's modified gravity, given in ...
1
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0answers
36 views

Studying physics at undergraduate level: Prerequisites [duplicate]

I have been really interested in physics for some time and also take active interest in quantum mechanics. I would like to pursue physics as my undergrad major. What kind of prerequisites does one ...
1
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1answer
160 views

Paper in physics - calculations; rounding or not?

I'm currently a high schooler, and I'm writing my first scientific paper. The result is fairly simple, and it is nothing too special, but I see it as a nice way to prepare myself for the academic ...
7
votes
1answer
202 views

Any open areas to work in non equilibrium thermodynamics for a Phd student? [closed]

I see that many papers written on fundamentals of thermodynamics(theory) nowadays are by some old professors somewhere(there may be exceptions). Most active young faculty don't seem to be seriously ...
1
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0answers
42 views

What is a good target to aim for when teaching myself quantum mechanics? [duplicate]

I'm interested in teaching myself quantum mechanics, and I'm looking for a good goal to aim for. I've got an undergrad maths degree and a graduate degree in probability theory and stochastic ...
0
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0answers
49 views

Book recommendation [duplicate]

I already learned the Physics' basics like Newton Laws, Electricity, and Optics. Can you recommend me a good book for advancing with my learning of physics(with some math)?
2
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0answers
86 views

Is everything in the universe discrete? [duplicate]

When beginning my education, I regarded nearly everything as continuous and analog in nature: Physical objects could have any mass on a continuous scale Light sources could emit any intensity of ...
2
votes
1answer
179 views

Analyse astronomical data

Recently I was told of a job offer to analyse astronomical data. The job offer states that they want somebody with knowledge of astronomical data analysis software and it will be a plus somebody who ...
5
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4answers
497 views

Entropy as an arrow of time

From what I understand, entropy is a concept defined by the experimentalist due to his ignorance of the exact microstate of a system. To say the number of accessible microstates $W$ of the universe is ...
4
votes
1answer
503 views

Way to become a physicist [duplicate]

I am a class 9 student in India. I want to become a physicist. What should I study after class 10? What are my options for colleges and universities? What should I do after my education? What are the ...
1
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1answer
124 views

Chemistry from a physical perspective [duplicate]

I'm currently learning chemistry for the first time, and loving it. I have a reasonably good physics and maths background and it's great to see things like spherical harmonics in quantum mechanics ...
3
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2answers
103 views

How to deal with the notation of a function $f$ vs its value $f(x)$ in Physics?

This doubt is very silly, but anyway, I think it's worth asking. The problem is: when we work with mathematics, in many situations we want to consider sets $A$ and $B$ and functions $f : A \to B$. ...
5
votes
2answers
473 views

What is the significance of Lie groups $SO(3)$ and $SU(2)$ to particle physics?

I was hoping someone could give an overview as to how the Lie groups $SO(3)$ and $SU(2)$ and their representations can be applied to describe particle physics? The application of Lie groups and their ...
0
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0answers
65 views

Orbital motion (Mechanics) [duplicate]

I am a student in Mechanical department and I took today a lesson with a title of Orbital motion. I need a good mechanics reference that discusses this topic.
3
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2answers
583 views

Equation of everything

Is this equation in the image true? Can you give some topics that I can cover the equation.
2
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0answers
66 views

How would Einstein's later years have been different with modern computers? [closed]

This is a historical question partly, and maybe too broad for this site, but would require some familiarity with modern physics research practice so hopefully appropriate here. Einstein's later ...
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1answer
92 views

Do Physics concepts build on top of other concepts?

I am taking a calculus based physics class and I am struggling. I am wondering if I do not understand some concepts, will I be unable to understand future concepts introduced in the same class? In ...
0
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1answer
173 views

How to know if something is a primitive concept, a law, a definition or a theorem

Some basic Physics books are often misguiding in the sense that they don't make clear whether something is a primitive concept, a law, a definition or a theorem. This is often a little confusing. I've ...
5
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2answers
261 views

Do I need to study the “Standard Model” before studying String Theory?

After this semester, I'll have a background up to a first course in QFT (first 5 or 6 chapters of Peskin and Schroeder). The next step in QFT will be something specific to the Standard Model ...
0
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4answers
201 views

Can physics (ever) explain intrinsic properties of nature? [closed]

I may be totally off with this quite abstract (?) question(s). But still, here are some closely related sub-questions: Is there a list of currently "known" intrinsic properties of nature? How ...