1
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2answers
71 views

Why is scattering vector $\vec{q}$ called vector of 'momentum transfer'?

In the world of scattering the angle at which you detect the scattered radiation is known as $q$, where $$ \vec{q} = \frac{4\pi\eta}{\lambda}\sin(\theta/2) $$ I read in a lot of books that this is ...
1
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1answer
42 views

Decrease in Intensity [closed]

A beam of particles pass through a target made of thin foil of a very small thickness $\Delta x$ having $N$ particles per unit volume. Let the collision cross section be $\sigma$ . If the intensity of ...
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0answers
90 views

Collision of 2 neutrons

If two neutrons collide in 3D space and we want to determine the final velocities of both nuetrons (3 components for each neutrons), we can use the conservation of momentum equations and the ...
2
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0answers
34 views

How to write down the detailed balance (microreversed) amplitude

I know that time-reversal of a reaction and the detailed balance (microreversed, or reciprocal) reaction are different. Textbooks on scattering theory explain how to relate the S-matrix elements of a ...
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1answer
73 views

Do particles in the solar core travel at the same speed as they would in vacuum?

I just read the Wikipedia article on the Sun. The section on Solar Core states It has a density of up to 150 g/cm3[47][48] (about 150 times the density of water) Do the particles (atomic, and ...
1
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1answer
825 views

Scattering problem: Converting the two-body lab frame problem into a one-body center-of-mass frame problem

I'm reading the section on scattering in Goldstein's Classical Mechanics, and I have a rather basic question about this. It says that scattering in the laboratory is a two-body problem because of ...