A tag for questions about the mechanical interactions of rotating objects, including torque and angular momentum.

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3
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2answers
199 views

Conceptual rolling

If you could roll a ball down a slope with friction, we would all know which direction the ball is rolling. However, say we have a frictionless slope and we roll the ball in the opposite direction and ...
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5answers
2k views

Veritasium - Firing bullet in block - along center and away from center

This question is about this video on YouTube, in which a bullet is fired vertically into the center of a wooden block from below, sending the block up into the air. Next, a bullet is fired vertically ...
3
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1answer
1k views

how does international space station change its orientation?

In what way does the rotating gyroscope help in changing the orientation of the international space station in space ? Is there any other way to change the the orientation of ISS ?
3
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3answers
12k views

Factors affecting torque and RPM of a motor [closed]

I am not a physics guy, so not even the basic concept of a DC motor is easy for me. My question is as follows: How do these parts of a motor affect its RPM and Torque? I had my research a while ago ...
3
votes
2answers
374 views

Astronaut on a rotating asteroid

This might sound like the silliest question ever, but can someone shed some light on what is actually happening in the following situation: There is an asteroid in outer space what is rotating with ...
3
votes
2answers
2k views

Can moment of inertia be negative? [closed]

Q: Find out the moment of inertia of a uniform circular disc of radius $r$ & mass $M$ & the axis passes through a point on the circumference. My attempt: Let the axis passes through $O$ on ...
3
votes
3answers
3k views

Why doesn't static friction decelerate a rolling body?

I know that static friction isn't the cause of deceleration of a rolling body. But if static friction is the only force in the horizontal direction, then shouldn't there be some acceleration produced ...
3
votes
4answers
30k views

Relationship between torque and angular momentum

I want to know how to deduce the equation $\vec{\tau}=\vec{\omega} \times \vec{L}$, where $\vec{\tau}$ is the moment of force (also known as torque), $\vec{L}$ is the angular momentum, $...
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2answers
2k views

Force applied off center on an object

Assume there is a rigid body in deep space with mass $m$ and moment of inertia $I$. A force that varies with time, $F(t)$, is applied to the body off-center at a distance $r$ from its center of mass. ...
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3answers
2k views

Does a toy top weigh less when it is spinning?

I am under the understanding that a toy top will weigh less when it is spinning. The Russians made a spinning type transport back in the 70s to lessen its payload over the tundra. Is this an effective ...
3
votes
3answers
908 views

what make the bottom portion of a wheel in rolling motion move?

As I just learn about the rolling motion which is the combination of pure translation and pure rotation. The top portion of the rolling body has the speed of double speed at the center of the object ...
3
votes
2answers
236 views

Maximum permissible speed while going down a ramp

So, I was playing hill climb racing and I noticed that if we move with high speeds towards a ramp going down we just jump it off. While lower speeds, help us to stay in contact with the ramp. ...
3
votes
1answer
505 views

What happens to a rotating rod that breaks in two?

I know that the approximation for the moment of inertia of an infinitely thin rod of mass $m$ and length $L$ spinning around an axis perpendicular to its own axis at its center is $\frac{mL^2}{3}$: ...
3
votes
1answer
146 views

Why isn't kinetic energy conserved in this rotational dynamics problem?

Consider a uniform rod which is spinning about an axis that goes through its centre, perpendicular to the rod itself. Two small rings are attached on the rod at equal distances from the centre. As the ...
3
votes
2answers
471 views

Why does locking the rear tires on a vehicle cause it to spin?

Handbrake Turns are often used in motor-sports and stunt driving to turn around tight corners. Essentially, the driver applies the handbrake as he enters the turn, in order to "kick out" the back end ...
3
votes
2answers
281 views

Free rotation of a rigid body

So I am currently reading Fowles and Cassidy and there is something I'm confused about in the section about geometric description of free rotation of a rigid body. I will present the stuff first that ...
3
votes
2answers
813 views

How does the kinetic energy of a ballerina increase? [duplicate]

When a ballerina pulls her arms in, her rotational kinetic energy increases because angular momentum is conserved. That means that work must have been done on her. I saw somewhere that there is work ...
3
votes
2answers
532 views

can we calculate velocity of a spinning apparatus by just analysing the frequency of sound emitted by it

I have used a new term spinning apparatus as I was unable to name it. I have tied a thread to a stone and was spinning it and I heard a sound something like that of a rotating propellor of a ...
3
votes
2answers
8k views

Moment of inertia of disc with a hole

Suppose we have a disc with a hole, when computing moment of inertia of this about the disc's centre. Why do we subtract the moment of inertia of the removed part from the moment of inertia of ...
3
votes
1answer
553 views

Find angular momentum about any point

How do I find the angular momentum of a body about any point? We know that $L=I\omega$ for a body rotating in space, where $L$ denotes the angular momentum, $I$ denotes the moment of inertia and $\...
3
votes
1answer
938 views

Why does dust stick so well to fan blades? [duplicate]

After reading and understanding the reasons why dust stick to rotating fan propeller, I am interested to find out why the dust particles stick so well. Spraying powerful jets of water does not ...
3
votes
2answers
1k views

Ice skater increase of energy

This may be a very basic question but I am not seeing how it works. Consider the standard example of an ice skate rotating about his/her center of mass and pulling in his/her arms. The torque is zero ...
3
votes
3answers
77 views

Friction-free rolling/sliding on an inclined plane

Suppose a sphere is rolling down an inclined plane. There is no friction. The body will not roll and undergo just a translation. But why is this so? If we consider the axis to be along the point of ...
3
votes
2answers
132 views

Why do tires with low air pressure experience more friction?

How does tyre pressure affect the frictional force on a tyre even though friction is independent of area of contact? And how does one analyze or calculate this friction?
3
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2answers
446 views

Why does the water bottle not rotate when it is half full?

Consider this water bottle: When it is full and thrown up in the air, it rotates at a constant velocity. When it is less than 1/8th full, the water bottle rotates even faster than when it was full....
3
votes
2answers
386 views

Rolling as pure rotation

In my book the following statement was written and I didn't understand it well. Can anyone explain it in a more simple way? Figure 11-6 suggests another way to look at the rolling motion of a ...
3
votes
1answer
187 views

Paradox of angular velocity

For a torque-free symmetric top, the Inertia tensor has an inverse $I^{-1}$, and $L=I\omega$. Which implies that $\omega=I^{-1}L$. But since $I, L$ are constants, $\vec\omega$ is a constant. However, $...
3
votes
1answer
701 views

How to know the time a disc takes to stop from rotating and the numbers of revolutions

Assuming I rotate a disk, I want to know how long it takes to completely stop, and the number of revolutions it made since I removed my fingers off the disk. Lets say a DVD I rotate with my fingers. ...
3
votes
4answers
359 views

N particles, will there be any rotation after a period of time or everything will collapse

This is in context of classical Newtonian physics. Consider a system of n different point mass particles. Initially all are spread around on one plane. No particle possess any velocity to begin with. ...
3
votes
1answer
49 views

Force and Torque

Think of a uniform sphere. Sometimes if a force is applied to the sphere it does not only move but also spins. So there is a torque. But is it possible to calculate which part of the applied force is ...
3
votes
1answer
67 views

Moment of inertia meaning?

Why is the formula for calculating the moment of inertia this integral $$ \int r^2 dm~? $$ I understand the way we derived this formula from looking at the distribution of kinetic energy of a ...
3
votes
1answer
149 views

Parallel axis theorem: adding mass

I'm going through a worked physics problem and have a question about the parallel axis theorem regarding only adding mass while not changing is axis of rotation. Here is the problem: A physics ...
3
votes
2answers
1k views

Angular momentum with respect to the centre of mass

I have been told [Warning: I leave this because it's what I asked and allows to understand the dialogues in the comments, but Azad, whom I thank, has pointed that the formula does not hold in general ...
3
votes
2answers
1k views

Why does an unhinged body rotate about its centre of mass?

If a force is applied to a body which does not act through its centre of mass, it rotates about its centre of mass and not any other point. Why?
3
votes
2answers
388 views

Centripetal force in frame of reference of body moving In a circle

Suppose a body is moving in a circle about a fixed point. In the frame of reference of the body, is the centripetal force felt or is only the centrifugal force felt? More generally, does a body only ...
3
votes
2answers
639 views

Deriving $T = F\ r = I\alpha$ for a rigid body

For a single point mass : $\tau=F_{t}r=ma_tr=(m r^2)\alpha = I\alpha$ For multiple point masses bound together : $\sum \tau_i = (m_ir_i^2)\alpha = I\alpha$ But how do we go from that to $I\alpha = ...
3
votes
1answer
795 views

Intuitive explanation for why same force applied farther from a hinge causes larger angular acceleration than if applied closer?

A standard example of a problem involving torque is opening a door - the same force F applied far from the hinge causes a larger angular acceleration than if applied close to the hinge. I always had ...
3
votes
1answer
306 views

Calculating the path of a ball with spin moving across a table

A ping pong ball is rolling over a smooth (but not frictionless) table. During its travel, a clockwise spin is placed on the ball. The ball's path is changed to move to the right (in perspective from ...
3
votes
2answers
533 views

Foucault pendulum

The equations of motions for a Foucault pendulum are given by: $$\ddot{x} = 2\omega \sin\lambda \dot{y} - \frac{g}{L}x,$$ $$\ddot{y} = -2\omega \sin\lambda \dot{x} - \frac{g}{L}y.$$ What are the ...
3
votes
2answers
6k views

What causes precession or nutation in a spinning object?

What causes precession in a spinning object? What causes nutation in a spinning object? What causes a top, gyroscope, and the earth to wobble? Just because it's a simple question, I'm not ...
3
votes
2answers
2k views

Meaning of angular velocity in a rotating system

When you study the motion of a rigid body you have $\vec\omega$, the vector associated to angular velocity. In the case you are using Euler angles and want a quick formula for the rotational kinetic ...
3
votes
1answer
876 views

Altering Venus rotational speed to match Earth's via weather manipulation

Venus rotates approximately 6.5 km an hour Earth rotates approximately 1650 km/h how fast could we speed up Venus's rotation via only weather manipulation ( maybe a giant fractal lens between Venus ...
3
votes
1answer
288 views

What “I” should use in Rotational Energy formula $(I \omega^2)/2$

$\text{Rotational Energy} = \frac{1}{2} I \omega^2$. What $I$ should be used? $I$ as a inertia tensor matrix = stepRotation * inverse moment of inertia * inverse stepRotation; Or I as moment of ...
3
votes
1answer
3k views

What is the direction of the friction force on a rolling ball?

Suppose you have a solid ball on a horizontal table. What is the direction of friction force when the ball I pushed horizontally and starts rolling? Why is the direction of friction as it is? Which ...
3
votes
1answer
54 views

Differential equation of motion of combined rigid body

I am reading the following paper: http://tinyurl.com/jv2pu2m I have a question about (1) and (2): To (1), I think the following link provides good explanation. Equation of Motion for Rigid ...
3
votes
2answers
88 views

Intuitive explanation of rotational inertia with respect to angular momentum

I understand that there are proofs (e.g. proof, another proof) of why the angular momentum about two points for an object is the same. However, could someone give an intuitive explanation of why this ...
3
votes
1answer
168 views

What makes us twist in a somersault?

In a backwards straight somersault you can decide whether you twist early or late. Twisting early means, that you induce the twisting movement before you rotatation hits 180° and twisting late means, ...
3
votes
2answers
775 views

Advantages of a deadblow hammer?

A deadblow hammer is a type of mallet with a hollow head filled with shot or sand. When you hit with it, say on an anvil, the mallet does not rebound, but just falls flat and heavy. I don't ...
3
votes
1answer
217 views

Angular momentum-torque relationship in a rotating frame?

I have read that $$\vec\tau=\frac{\mathrm{d}\vec L}{\mathrm{d}t}$$ holds true whenever the origin is not accelerating. But I cannot see why this holds true for a rotating frame of reference (such as ...
3
votes
1answer
96 views

Changing Earth angle of revolution

As a follow-up to the two previous questions What is the scientific reason for the inclination of earth's rotation axis? and How much effort would be required to fix the Earth's rotation? ...