Resonance is driving a vibrating system to oscillate with greater amplitude at a specific preferential ("resonant") frequency, at which the system absorbs vibrational energy most efficiently.

learn more… | top users | synonyms

90
votes
6answers
10k views

Why do tuning forks have two prongs?

I believe the purpose of a tuning fork is to produce a single pure frequency of vibration. How do two coupled vibrating prongs isolate a single frequency? Is it possible to produce the same effect ...
50
votes
1answer
2k views

Why does our voice sound different on inhaling helium?

This question (and answer) is an attempt to clear the air on what appears to be a very simple issue, with conflicting or unclear explanations on the internet. Arguments, negations, etc are invited. ...
17
votes
1answer
2k views

Why don't tuning forks have three prongs?

I was reading Why tuning forks have two prongs?. The top answer said the reason was to reduce oscillation through the hand holding the other prong. So if having 2 prongs will reduce oscillation loss, ...
14
votes
2answers
1k views

Is the length of the day increasing?

In Frontiers of Astronomy, Fred Hoyle advanced an idea from E.E.R.Holmberg that although the Earth's day was originally much shorter than it is now, and has lengthened owing to tidal friction, that ...
13
votes
1answer
6k views

Theory behind patterns formed on Chladni plates?

In this video of vibrating Chladni plates we can see small sand particles align themselves into different interesting patterns (also shown in the image below) which correspond to some particular ...
12
votes
3answers
2k views

Resonances in high energy physics

I still do not understand what a resonance precisely is. Is it exactly the same as a particle? Or only an excited state? And why does it make a peak in some diagrams? And which diagrams?
12
votes
3answers
690 views

What are the rules for breaking a glass with your voice?

So, this morning I woke up and remembered something I discussed about with one of my friends: Can human voice really break a wine glass? So I looked it up and after checking many websites and ...
10
votes
1answer
1k views

Why do you only hear high frequencies when a microphone is near its speaker?

The phenomenon I'm talking about is positive feedback, as known from control engineering: when the microphone is too close to its speaker, it can "hear itself", so the signal will be infinitely ...
8
votes
3answers
17k views

Does the human body have a resonant frequency? If so, how strong is it?

Inspired by this question on Music beta SE, I'm wondering if the human body has a strong resonant frequency. I guess the fact that it's largely a bag of jelly would add a lot of damping to the system, ...
8
votes
1answer
555 views

Help me understand resonance

I don't fully understand how resonant chambers work. My confusion stems from the fact that the chambers are passive elements or filters, yet somehow are able to amplify the sound. Questions: How ...
8
votes
1answer
316 views

The Solar System explosion in the Nice model

This video depicts one variant of the Nice model (pronounced "neese", like the city in France). I'll briefly describe it in case the link ever dies. Here is the initial configuration: The four ...
7
votes
1answer
4k views

Why, when one opens 1 car window, does that noise occur?

When you're driving and you open 1 car window, say the front one, there comes a horrible noise, but when you open another window just the slightest bit, this noise goes away (I'm sure most people know ...
7
votes
2answers
1k views

Why does a container with fluid make different sounds at different fluid levels?

Have you ever noticed that when you are filling a container with fluid. As it approaches the top, it makes a different sound? You can tell by listening when your about to reach the top. Why is this?
6
votes
5answers
159 views

A conceptual doubt regarding Forced Oscillations and Resonance

While studying about the Resonance and Forced Oscillations, I came across a graph in my textbook that is given below:- Now, the author writes As the amount of damping increases, the peak shifts ...
6
votes
1answer
131 views

Can gravitational waves resonate?

Can gravitational waves resonate? - Perhaps by creating standing wave interference in a cavity? Could that feasibly happen either in nature or by engineering?
6
votes
1answer
405 views

Can soldiers marching at the right frequency realistically cause a bridge to break?

In my physics class it was suggested that ancient armies had a rough understanding of the idea of a resonant frequency and so they "broke step" when crossing bridges so as to avoid a very high $Q$. I ...
6
votes
1answer
895 views

Why do I hear a deep rumble when I cover my ears?

Probably a trivial thing but a simple google search didn't show anything relevant about it. If I cover both of my ears with my hands, I hear a very deep rumble. If I slowly move my hands away the ...
6
votes
1answer
898 views

Why do we hear this mysterious sound?

Sit in a silent place and then bring your hands close to your ears and cover your ears, you will start hearing some sound but if you remove your hands you don't hear it anymore. Can anyone explain ...
6
votes
2answers
2k views

Lots of little questions about radiation of LC circuits

I'm trying to get a more intuitive understanding of resonant inductive coupling. It's supposed be a more efficient way to transfer electrical energy wirelessly, because the coils are only coupled by ...
6
votes
3answers
8k views

What is the resonant frequency of liquid water?

I learned it's not 2.45 GHz. But what is it, then? In my failure to find the real value, I'm starting to wonder: does it even make sense talking about a resonant frequency of water molecules?
6
votes
2answers
323 views

Stability of Laplace resonance

Someone is making a mod for the video game Kerbal Space Program (KSP), which implements propper N-body with point masses into the game (and possibly in the future also other dynamics), instead of the ...
6
votes
0answers
36 views

How is Mössbauer spectroscopy so resistant to thermal motion?

Mössbauer spectroscopy detects tiny shifts (on the order of $\mu$eV or meV) in a gamma ray's energy due to the chemical environment of the nucleus. The scan consists of moving a source of excited ...
5
votes
1answer
691 views

How do you define the resonance frequency of a forced damped oscillator?

Consider a forced, damped harmonic oscillator $$\ddot{\phi} + 2\beta \dot{\phi} + \omega_0^2 \phi = j(t) \, .$$ If I pick a sinusoidal driving force $j(t) = A \cos(\Omega t)$, I find $$\phi(t) = ...
5
votes
1answer
165 views

To what degree does guitar construction affects the vibration of the strings?

There's an old debate going on in the guitar community about how much does wood choice and body shape affect the sound of an electric guitar. No one denies that there's a difference acoustically (how ...
5
votes
2answers
225 views

How can I use sound/resonance to clean sewers?

This probably doesn't fit into the realm of regular questions ; it is more of an applied rather than theory/math question ... Anyway, I'm curious whether a metre diameter speaker fitted over a ...
4
votes
2answers
591 views

What is the essential difference between a resonance and a particle?

Let me start by explaining my particle physics background is very patchy, so this question may not be as coherent as I would like it to be. In general terms, what is the difference between a ...
4
votes
2answers
348 views

The demise of the Tacoma Narrows bridge was casused by aeroelastic flutter. But isn't that just a special case of resonance?

Much of the research I've done on the Tacoma Narrows bridge disaster of 1940 attribute the collapse of the bridge due to aeroelastic flutter - not strucural resonance. But isn't aeroelastic flutter ...
4
votes
2answers
297 views

About Nuclear magnetic resonance

I'm trying to understand the basic principles of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance reading this link but I have some doubts: 1) I have ever known that when protons aren't in a magnetic field, their spins ...
4
votes
2answers
2k views

Why do objects have resonance at natural frequency?

What actually is a natural frequency for an object and what makes it vibrate with increased amplitude when coupled with an external oscillator that matches the natural frequency?
4
votes
4answers
6k views

How does radio receives signal from particular station?

When you tune your radio (digital or analog) to receive say 100 MHz frequency and while in the environment there are hundreds of channels everywhere around the radio. How does it chooses to receive ...
4
votes
2answers
468 views

EmDrive Cavity modes

The EMDrive described in patent application GB 2493361 is a simple section of a sphere surrounded by a superconducting cooling system. I have attempted to solve the oscillation modes possible and ...
4
votes
1answer
944 views

$Q$ factor of parallel RLC circuit in series with a capacitor and resistor

I know that for parallel RLC circuits, the $Q$ factor is given by: $$ Q = R \sqrt {\frac{C}{L}} $$ But now suppose it is connected in series to a resistor $R_2$ and capacitor $C_2$. Would the $Q$ ...
4
votes
1answer
96 views

Is this oscillator driven?

A mass $m$ is attached to a vertical massless spring or a spring constant $k$. Originally, the spring was relaxed because the mass was held by a clip. Suddenly the clip was released. THe mass ...
4
votes
1answer
997 views

Why does the addition of paramagnetic ions decrease the spin lattice relaxation time of protons?

My question pertains to NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance). $T_1$, the spin lattice relaxation time of protons in water is about 2.5 seconds. If you add some $CuSO_4$ (copper sulfate) to the water the ...
4
votes
1answer
268 views

Electron Spin Resonance and Free electrons

When performing an experiment to observe electron spin resonance, we use DPPH molecules as they contain an unpaired electron on one of the N atoms. My question is, why cant free electrons be used in ...
4
votes
0answers
148 views

Driven Pendulum

If the point of suspension of a pendulum is driven periodically in the vertical direction , we can derive the equation of motion for the suspended mass to be of the form, $\ddot{\theta}(t) + ...
3
votes
2answers
11k views

Phase difference of driving frequency and oscillating frequency

If a mass is attached to a spring and is oscillating (SHM). If a driving force is applied it must be at the same frequency as the mass's oscillation frequency. However I'm told that the phase ...
3
votes
2answers
275 views

Why does the length of a wind instrument affect it's pitch?

I understand how length of a string on any string instrument affects it's pitch, but I don't understand how a short wind instrument produces a high pitch.
3
votes
2answers
314 views

What is zero impedance in AC circuit?

If a capacitor is connected with an inductor, then because $$Z=\frac{1}{j\omega C}+j\omega L,$$ the Z may be zero. Does that mean when I apply a voltage, the current will be infinite large? What's ...
3
votes
3answers
3k views

Why do we take the first derivative of EPR/ESR spectra?

Apologies if this question is a bit too chemistry-flavoured. In electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, there's a practically ubiquitous convention of plotting the first derivative of the ...
3
votes
2answers
317 views

Materials that change their natural frequency

Say I have some material (solid, liquid, plasma, etc.). It has a set of natural frequencies. Now I pass a wave through it (sound, light, etc.). Once I pass the wave thought it, the material has a ...
3
votes
1answer
1k views

Can sound be used to purify/filter water?

I remember reading about all chicken at a poultry farm being violently sick/dying for apparently no reason. It turned out the culprit was machinery at a nearby factory that emitted sound at a ...
3
votes
1answer
376 views

Free/open source tools for calculating normal modes, failing that, advice

Are there any open source tools for calculating the normal modes of arbitrary objects? Input would be some 3D design format and material properties, output would be movement direction and magnitude ...
3
votes
1answer
250 views

How does resonance store vibrational energy?

In the wiki article, it is written that in resonance, maximum amplitude is possible as vibrational energy is stored. What does that statement mean? How is energy stored so that max. amplitude ...
3
votes
3answers
2k views

Does the Breit Wigner formula apply to intermediate virtual particles?

Breit Wigner Formula describes the cross section for interactions that proceed dominantly via a intermediate particle (O*) A+B → O* → C + D: $$σ = \frac{2\Pi}{k^{2}}\frac{Γ_{i}Γ_{f}}{(E-E_{o})^{2} + ...
3
votes
2answers
399 views

How might a resonant antenna and black body radiation interact?

How does an antenna behave when it is cooled so that its black-body radiation is emitting energy at its resonant frequency? Edit: To clarify, its not how they're related in general, but how might ...
3
votes
1answer
24 views

Why the common beam in Barton's pendulum?

N So the theory is that R vibrates with largest amplitude due to resonance. Because when measured from the common beam its length is the same as that of A, so A's vibration would pass to R the same ...
3
votes
1answer
75 views

How to derive end-correction value relationship for open-ended air columns?

According to Young and Freedman's Physics textbook, in open-ended air columns like some woodwind instruments, the position of the displacement antinode extends a tiny amount beyond the end of the ...
3
votes
2answers
2k views

Why does a wine glass with less water resonate at a higher frequency?

In this video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hWwM7F-zaHs, Professor Lewin showed that for the tube, the less water there is, the longer the effective length of the tube and therefore, the lower the ...
3
votes
2answers
619 views

Harmonic Oscillator driven by a Dirac delta-like force

Consider that there is no damping for simplicity. As we know, a driving force of the form $\sin(\omega t)$ will make the oscillator at steady state vibrates at the external frequency $\omega$. What ...