Renormalization is an ensemble of techniques which serves to treat the infinities which appear in quantum field theory or statistical mechanics.

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Power counting with a cutoff

In Effective Field Theory video lectures found here, the professor explained power counting in effective field theories and the difficulties of power counting associated with loop diagrams. He then ...
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Can renormalization group evolution be used to capture emergence?

I am posing this question with condensed matter systems in mind. Is it, in principle, possible to obtain emergence using the renormalization group (RG)? I read in X.-G. Wen's book (Quantum Field ...
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Why does local gauge invariance suggest renormalizability?

I'm reading Gauge Field Theories: An Introduction with Applications by Mike Guidry and this particular remark is not obvious to me: A tempting avenue is suggested by the QED paradigm, for if a ...
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Suggested reading for renormalization (not only in QFT)

What papers/books/reviews can you suggest to learn what Renormalization "really" is? Standard QFT textbooks are usually computation-heavy and provide little physical insight in this regard - after my ...
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Wilson's Renormalization Group and Lie's Third Theorem

If you think of a one-parameter group of transformations along a curve in the plane as a (Lie) group, and the tangent vector to the curve as a generator of the curve we can intuitively understand ...
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Deriving Feynman rules from Renormalized Lagrangian

In the context of Renormalized Pertubation Theory Peskin Schröder says: The Lagrangian $$ \mathcal{L}=\frac{1}{2} (\partial_\mu\phi_r)^2-\frac{1}{2}m^2\phi_r^2-\frac{\lambda}{4!}\phi_r^4 + \frac{1}{2} ...
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O(N) sigma model renormalization

Does anyone know, is a model with lagrangian $\mathcal{L} = \frac{(\partial_{\mu}\phi_a)^2}{2}-\frac{m^2 \phi_a^2}{2}-\frac{\lambda}{8N}(\phi_a \, \phi_a)^2$ renormalizable? I'm using BPHZ scheme and ...
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Does the 4/3 problem of classical electromagnetism remain in quantum mechanics?

In Volume II Chapter 28 of the Feymann Lectures on Physics, Feynman discusses the infamous 4/3 problem of classical electromagnetism. Suppose you have a charged particle of radius $a$ and charge $q$ ...
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About the dimension of the longitudinal component of vector field

According to this lecture note http://www.staff.science.uu.nl/~wit00103/qft05.pdf page 115. Consider a Lagrangian for a massive vector field $$L = -\frac{1}{4} (\partial_{\mu} V_{\nu} - ...
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Apparent elimination of overlapping divergences

The integral, $$ \iint_{\mathbb{R}^{2+}}\frac{xy}{1+x+y} \mathrm{d}y \, \mathrm{d}x$$ possesses an overlapping divergence when $ x \to \infty $ and $ y \to \infty $. However, under a change of ...
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How to connect the dimension of perturbation constant with renormalizability

Let's have the Lagrangian $$ L = L_{0} + \lambda V , \qquad (1) $$ where $\lambda$ is constant which is small in the next senses: if $\lambda$ is dimensionless, it means that $\lambda < 1$; if it ...
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Renormalization of worldsheet energy-momentum tensor

At the end of section 2.3, Polchinski (in his volume 1) derives the energy-momentum tensor for free massless scalars on worldsheet. He adds a footnote that "the only possible ambiguity introduced by ...
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Do exact beta functions exist in (super)gravity theories and string theory?

An exact beta function exists for Super-Yang-Mills theories in 4D without matter - the so-called NSVZ beta function. Does a similar exact beta-function exist in gravity or supergravity theories? In ...
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Is the Higgs bare mass larger than the physical mass?

The Higgs boson propagator can be written $$\frac{1}{p^2-m^2+\Sigma(p^2)}$$. If we take $p^2=m_P^2$ the physical mass, we get $m_P^2=m^2-\Sigma(m_P^2)$. Now, if $\Sigma\sim \Lambda^2$, we get ...
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Why does a spurion analysis work independently of the UV physics?

In short, my question is why does a spurion analysis work to produce the correct symmetry breaking terms regardless of the high energy physics? The context that this question arose is from an ...
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Dimensional regularization and the finite part

Let be a dimensional regularized integral $$ \int d^{4-\epsilon}kF(k,m,s)= \frac{2}{\epsilon}+\frac{m^{2}}{3}(\gamma +log(4\pi)-\frac{1}{\epsilon}))$$ then formally if we elmiinate the divergent ...
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Proof of renormalizability based on analyzing the symmetry of effective action: isn't regulator also important?

In QFT Vol2 written by Weinberg(Chap 16-17), or very much similarly in Adel Bilal's notes(Chap 7), a powerful way of proving renormalizability is presented: Analyze the symmetries of the quantum ...
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What is the significance of the branch cut in renormalization group logarithms?

What is the physical significance of the branch cut in renormalization group logarithms? (Is this just an avatar of the optical theorem, or is there something to be understood about these logarithms ...
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Renormalizing composite operators

Consider the QED Lagrangian, \begin{equation} {\cal L} = \bar{\psi} ^{(0)} ( i \partial_\mu \gamma^\mu - m ) \psi ^{(0)} - e A _\mu ^{(0)} \bar{\psi} ^{(0)} \gamma ^\mu \psi ^{(0)} - \frac{1}{4} ...
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Anomalous Dimensions of Gauge Interactions

Peskin and Schroeder mention a few times that the anomalous dimension of a gauge interaction operator is zero. The justification for this is that the charge operator shouldn't get modified under ...
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Some conceptual questions on the renormalization group

I recently followed courses on QFT and the subject of renormalization was discussed in some detail, largely following Peskin and Schroeder's book. However, the chapter on the renomalization group is ...
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Renormalizing with external momenta set to zero

I've often seen in textbooks that authors renormalize diagrams by setting external momentum to zero. Under what conditions is this justified? An example of this is done in Manohar and Wise's book on ...
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Quantum field theories with asymptotic freedom

QCD is the best-known example of theories with negtive beta function, i.e., coupling constant decreases when increasing energy scale. I have two questions about it: (1) Are there other theories with ...
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Trace of Fermion Loops in Effective Field Theories

I'd like to know whether we need to take the trace of fermion loops in effective theory in the same way that we need to do so for renormalizable theories. At first thought, it seems obvious that ...
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Why is mass renormalization insufficient to explain electron mass?

In the Standard Model, I understand that the mass of the electron is assume to arise from two effects: A bare mass given by Yukawa interaction with the Higgs field, and A mass correction from mass ...
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Renormalizing IR and UV divergences

In lectures on effective field theory the professor wanted to find the correction to the four point vertex in massless $\phi^4$ theory by calculating the diagram, $\hspace{6cm}$ We consider the zero ...
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Are “confinement” and “asymptotic freedom” two sides of the same coin?

On Wikipedia it says that the two peculiar properties of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) are: confinement and asymptotic freedom. Asymptotic freedom is the idea that at low energies we cannot use ...
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In what sense is the renormalization group equation a group?

The renormalization group equation is given by: \begin{equation} \left[\mu \frac{\partial}{\partial \mu} + \beta \frac{\partial}{\partial g} + m \gamma_{m^2} \frac{\partial}{\partial m} - n \gamma_d ...
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How does the renormalization scale $\mu$ cancel in all finite observables?

In dimensional regularization, we must shift the dimensionless coupling $g$ by the renormalization scale $\mu$ (which has unit mass dimension): \begin{equation} g \rightarrow \mu^{4-d} g \tag{1} ...
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Renormalization and the Hierarchy Problem

The hierarchy problem is roughly: A scalar particle such as the Higgs receives quadratically divergent corrections, that have to cancel out delicately with the bare mass to give the observed Higgs ...
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Field Strength Renorm in Peskin&Schroeder

On page 237 in PS we have (the unnumbered equation after eq. 7.58) $$\mathcal{P} \sim \frac{iZ}{p^2-m^2-iZ\,\mathrm{Im}M^2(p^2)}$$ but after deriving it myself I obtained $$\mathcal{P} \sim ...
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How do we measure the physical field of a particle?

In the renormalization procedure of quantum field theories, say $\lambda \phi^4$ theory for simplicity, we use the physical mass $m$, the physical coupling constant $\lambda$ and the physical field ...
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Reference for the renormalization of a scalar field's mass

There are a couple of interesting lectures by Leonard Susskind online, and in the first lecture on Supersymmetry & Grand Unification he explains renormalization. His example is the mass ...
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Evaluate $1$-loop contribution to the $4$-point Green's function

I am trying to evaluate the following integral \begin{equation} I = \int \frac{d^d p_\text{E}}{(2 \pi)^d} \frac{1}{(p_\text{E}^2+m^2)((q_\text{E}-p_\text{E})^2 + m^2)} \tag{1} \end{equation} where ...
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How do we know for sure a theory is non-renormalizable?

In quantum field theory, we are looking for a Lagrangian that is, amongst other, renormalizable. But how do we determine whether or not a theory is renormalizable? Is this purely done by power ...
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Observable which dependes on the cutoff

In arXiv:0710.4330v1 Balitsky calculate the eikonal scattering of dipole composed of quark anti-quark, $Tr(U_{x}U^{\dagger}_{y})$, to NLO accuracy. The result he found is: Where $\mu$ is the ...
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Why is $\vert \phi \vert ^2$ infinite in QFT?

I've read here¹ that for a scalar field $\phi$, the square $\vert \phi \vert ^2$ is infinite (which gives an infinite contribution to mass), more precisely: the square of the field – a quantity ...
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Mass corrections to fermions proportional to the mass?

In this post regarding quantum corrections to a massless fermion field, the answerer stated that quantum corrections to the mass will always be proportional to the mass (at least in QED). This point ...
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The phrase “Trace Anomaly” seems to be used in two different ways. What's the relation between the two?

I've seen the phrase "Trace Anomaly" refer to two seemingly different concepts, though I assume they must be related in some way I'm not seeing. The first way I've seen it used is in the manner, for ...
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Could quarks be free in higher-dimensional space than 3D?

Reading this answer, I now wonder: if quarks are confined by $r^2$ potential, could their potential allow infinite motion in higher-dimensional space? To understand why I thought this might be ...
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A question about the implication of UV divergence in QFT

I have a basic question about the logic of renormalization in quantum field theory (QFT). We met the ultraviolet (UV) divergence in loop corrections. The standard argument is, our current field theory ...
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Quick-and-dirty way to integrate out heavy fields

I understand the roughly understand the process of integrating out heavy degrees of freedom of a Lagrangian, namely, taking the action and performing the path integral over the high momentum modes. ...
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Equality of electric charges of all leptons

What does it precisely mean the often repeated statement that the electric charges of all leptons are the same. Let's consider QED with two leptons: electron and muon. The interaction part of the ...
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Neglecting mass at asymptotic spacelike momenta

What is the rational/reason for neglecting masses at asymptotic non-exceptional space-like momenta. I have come across this as a first fix for being able to extract information from the ...
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Some questions about the large-N Gross-Neveu-Yukawa model

Consider the following action with a fermionic field $\psi$ and a scalar field $\sigma$, $S = \int d^dx \{ -\bar{\psi}(\gamma^\mu \partial_\mu +\sigma )\psi + \Lambda^{d-4}[ \frac{(\partial_\mu ...
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No non-trivial UV asymptotically free and IR free

How it could be proven that a non-trivial theory cannot be both asymptotically free and IR free (g=0 both in the UV and IR with some interpolating function in between)? This is of course contrary to ...
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Regularization and renomalization in the lightcone quantization of bosonic string

This question relates to this link. But I still don't understand it >_< In Polchinski's string theory vol I, p. 22, there is a divergence term (when $\epsilon \rightarrow 0$) in the zero point ...
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Divergent sum in lightcone quantization of bosonic string theory

I had the following question regarding lightcone quantization of bosonic strings - The normal ordering requirement of quantization gives us this infinite sum $\sum_{n=1}^\infty n$. This is regularized ...
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Divergent bare parameters/couplings: what is the physical meaning of it? Do this have any relation with wilson's renormalization group approach?

I understand that bare parameters in the Lagrangian are different from the physical one that you measure in an experiment. I'm wondering if the fact that they are divergent has any physical meaning? ...
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How does the sum of the series “1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + 5 + 6…” to infinity = “-1/12”? [duplicate]

How does the sum of the series “1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + 5 + 6…” to infinity = “-1/12”, in the context of physics? I heard Lawrence Krauss say this once during a debate with Hamza Tzortzis ...