1
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1answer
110 views

GPS Satellite - Special Relativity

I'm going through an old relativity assignment, and I've been asked to calculate the time dilation for a satellite which orbits the earth in 12 hours at 26000km from the surface, and travels at a ...
2
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1answer
86 views

Where are the time dilatational effects of orbital motion and gravitational acceleration equal?

Nearly four years ago, upon hearing of the observation of time dilation in two optical atomic clocks at an elevation one metre apart, due to acceleration towards earths centre of gravity by Chou, C. ...
7
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3answers
877 views

Why does time stop in black holes?

Everyone says that time stops in the black hole. It's a "fact". However, I have never heard everyone explaining that. Of course, I know that observer in weaker gravitational field sees that something ...
1
vote
1answer
80 views

How big or small is a reference frame in Relativity?

What exactly is a frame of reference? Does it have an objective existence and if so what is it? What's the size of a reference frame? Is a reference frame the same size for a stationary frame of ...
1
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1answer
57 views

Constant speed in curved space

Suppose a spaceship is travelling in the Schwarzschild metric. An observer at infinity sees the spaceship moving at constant velocity. What does this mean? Does it mean that: \begin{align*} ...
0
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1answer
74 views

How does a black hole slow time? [duplicate]

I've been reading about black holes, and I keep coming across the fact that time runs slower near a them. My questions are: Does this mean that if you left Earth at age 30 and spent 30 years near the ...
0
votes
1answer
120 views

What's the meaning of the age of the universe?

I'm not asking about how we worked backward from an expanding universe to the age of the big bang, but rather what is the meaning of time in a near infinitely dense point in the context of general ...
2
votes
2answers
244 views

How long does it take for a black hole to form?

The well-known fable of an astronaut sending signals out to an external observer while falling toward an event horizon states that the time lapse between such signals becomes greater even if in the ...
0
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2answers
213 views

If NASA could send a camera into a black hole, could we then see what's inside the black hole?

Inspired by Stephen Hawking I recently tripped upon an idea of what is really inside a black hole. I thought if NASA (or any other space agency) could send a super protected camera into a black hole, ...
0
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0answers
47 views

Does a black hole singularity last essentially no intrinsic time? [duplicate]

Reading an interesting article on a recent ArXiv paper by Carlo Rovelli and Francesca Vidotto on so-called Planck stars, at https://medium.com/the-physics-arxiv-blog/6cf7ec0ed28b I was struck by the ...
5
votes
4answers
220 views

Is there a distinguished reference system, after all?

The equivalence principle, being the main postulate upon which the general relativity theory rests, basically states that all reference systems are equivalent, because pseudo forces can (locally) be ...
5
votes
3answers
185 views

Is isotropy a fundamental/invariant feature of our universe, or is it merely a convenient, albeit arbitrary, feature of some reference frames?

This is related to a previous post. Assuming that the Cosmological Principle is correct, does this imply that the universe possess an empircially privileged reference frame? What I am trying to ...
7
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2answers
267 views

Assuming that the Cosmological Principle is correct, does this imply that the universe possess an empirically privileged reference frame?

OK...before everyone blasts this with references to the relativistic invariance of the physical laws, time dilation, etc let me add some context. Also, I am an amateur with an interest in physics, so ...
1
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2answers
258 views

Watching something fall into a black hole from far away

I am observing (theoretically) an object falling into a black hole from a safe distance away. My understanding is that from far away it appears as if the body will asymptotically approach the event ...
1
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2answers
152 views

Variance in speed of light

While discussing this question (Does light have an unending journey?) I stumbled on the fact that light's speed is constant only in inertial frame. What I happened to do was add up the expansion of ...
1
vote
2answers
103 views

Whose reference frame to use for $d \theta$ near a black hole?

Using the Schwarzchild metric for a body circularly orbiting a nonspinning black hole (i.e. $dr=0$), the relation between $d\tau$, the time between two light pulses sent out infinitesimally close ...
1
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1answer
135 views

Does gravitational lensing violate Fermat's Principle that light must travel in straight lines?

Does bending of light due to warping of space violate Fermat's Principle or is it that in the principle light goes in a straight line with respect to space (taking space as the reference) and in ...
5
votes
2answers
200 views

A thought experiment on vision and curved spacetime

What follows is a long self-made example to deal with my conceptual issues of visualizing curved spacetime. Imagine an observer floating somewhere in space. He feels no strain on his body, ...
5
votes
3answers
2k views

Why does light always travel in a straight line?

No matter the frame light is in, it always moves in a straight line in that frame. Why is that? It doesn't seem like something to me that should necessarily be true. If some one runs forward and sends ...
4
votes
0answers
242 views

Tensor equations in General Relativity

In the context of general relativity it is often stated that one of the main purposes of tensors is that of making equations frame-independent. Question: why is this true? I'm looking for a ...
2
votes
2answers
272 views

Local inertial coordinates

It is said that we can introduce local inertial coordinates for any timelike geodesic. But why only for timelike geodesics? What about null geodesics? Perhaps it has to do with invertibility or ...
3
votes
1answer
191 views

Space time a function of itself, objects in it, or both?

Is spacetime a function of itself, objects within it, or both? I am struggling to understand just what is spacetime without objects in it (or theoretical reference points) and thus no frame of ...
2
votes
1answer
485 views

Difference between proper and comoving frames

I'm reading this book "Introduction to Quantum Fields in Classical Backgrounds" by Mukhanov & Winitzki, and there in the chapter 8 "The Unruh Effect" they introduce 3 reference frames. Laboratory ...
0
votes
4answers
2k views

The bigger the mass, the more time slows down. Why is this?

If I were to stand by a pyramid, which weighs about 20 million tons, I would slow down by a trillion million million million of second. Don't know if that's exactly right, but you get the point. Also, ...
11
votes
2answers
2k views

Does the speed of light vary in noninertial frames?

The speed of light is the same in all inertial frames. Does it change from a non-inertial frame to another? Can it be zero? If it is not constant in non-inertial frames, is it still bounded from ...
3
votes
1answer
692 views

Time dilation - why the observers see each other the slow one but then one of them is older or younger?

I'm in trouble with time dilation: Suppose that there's two people on the Earth (A,B), they are twins and each other has a clock. (So they are at the same reference frame). B travels in a spaceship ...
1
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1answer
551 views

Curvature of spacetime in only required to explain tidal forces?

I'm a bit confused about the equivalence principle in GR. I'm quoting from Wikipedia: An observer in an accelerated reference frame must introduce what physicists call fictitious forces to ...
4
votes
2answers
146 views

Effect of gravity at near-lightspeeds

Let's say I'm in a space station, hurtling towards our galaxy nearly close to the speed of light. From my reference frame, I see the galaxy coming towards my ship at the same speed. I pass the Sun, ...
2
votes
1answer
287 views

Thought experiment about acceleration

Case 1: two people wake up in spaceships accelerating at 1g. They can measure or observe anything inside the room but not outside. They couldn't determine if they were on a spaceship or on earth. ...
5
votes
1answer
295 views

Is General Relativity applicable for all coordinate systems?

My understanding was that relativistic physics can be expressed in any inertial coordinate system, but not arbitrary systems. That is, no experiment can determine if we are "still" or "moving" at a ...
13
votes
6answers
16k views

How exactly does time slow down near a black hole?

How exactly does time slow down near a black hole? I have heard this as a possible way of time traveling, and I do understand that it is due in some way to the massive gravity around a black hole, but ...
17
votes
5answers
3k views

How is the classical twin paradox resolved?

I read a lot about the classical twin paradox recently. What confuses me is that some authors claim that it can be resolved within SRT, others say that you need GRT. Now, what is true (and why)?