2
votes
1answer
64 views

Rotation from Goldstein's Classical Mechanics

I apologize for the ambiguity in my title. It was rather difficult to figure out what is the most appropriate title for my questions. My questions come from chapter 4 and chapter 5 of Goldstein, ...
3
votes
1answer
214 views

Angular momentum depends on origin?

The angular momentum of a particle rotating about a point is given by $\vec{L} = \vec{r} \times \vec{p}$. Imagine a particle tracing a circular path on a flat table. If I put the origin of my ...
2
votes
2answers
140 views

Angular Momentum of a rigid, extended object

Angular momentum of an object is a physical quantity that depends on the chosen point about which to calculate the angular momentum. It is often said that an object that has been thrown up in the air ...
3
votes
1answer
111 views

Paradox of angular velocity

For a torque-free symmetric top, the Inertia tensor has an inverse $I^{-1}$, and $L=I\omega$. Which implies that $\omega=I^{-1}L$. But since $I, L$ are constants, $\vec\omega$ is a constant. However, ...
1
vote
2answers
185 views

Internal/Rotational angular momentum

I have some difficulties to understand the relation between the internal and the rotational angular momentum of a rigid body which is also known as K├Ânig's theorem, so what physical intuition lies ...
2
votes
1answer
576 views

Conservation of angular momentum across different reference frames?

I saw the following problem from the USAPhO: A uniform pool ball of radius $r$ begins at rest on a pool table. The ball is given a horizontal impulse $J$ of fixed magnitude at a distance $\beta r$ ...
1
vote
2answers
738 views

motion in the body-fixed frame?

This is really basic, I'm sure: For rigid body motion, Euler's equations refer to $L_i$ and $\omega_i$ as measured in the fixed-body frame. But that frame is just that: fixed in the body. So how ...
4
votes
2answers
163 views

Would the arms of a rotating ice skater still move outwards if there was no other object in the universe?

If there is no other object in the universe apart from a rotating ice skater, then nothing can be used as a reference frame. Would it make any sense to say that the skater is rotating? If so, rotating ...
12
votes
3answers
455 views

Do particles have different spins in different frames of reference?

Let's say we have two photons, whose momentum vectors point to opposite directions. Also spin angular momentum vectors of the photons point to opposite directions. (Sum of spins is zero) Now we ...