A reference frame is a particular coordinate system chosen to represent physical entities. The notion is most often used in special and general relativity to dentoe particular coordinates chosen on the spacetime manifold.

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Can time be interacted with? [duplicate]

Astronauts come back to Earth younger than they would have been had they stayed on Earth for that same period of time. They are traveling so fast relative to the Earth that time slows down for them. ...
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Moment of Inertia of Polygons in the Plane [on hold]

I was reading this link, which describes a method of finding the moment of inertia of a general convex polygon by splitting it into triangles. I then realized I have no idea on how to derive a such a ...
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How can the clock c1 be synchronized with the clock c2?

A clock c1 is situated at a distance $L$ from an observer carrying a clock c1. How can the clock c1 be synchronized with the clock c2?
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Why do we write the lengths in the following way? Question about Lorentz transformation

Yesterday we have studied the Lorentz transformation in school. So we have two frames of reference, $S$ and $S'$ . $S$ is stationary and $S'$. $S'$ has a constant velocity $v$, relative to the $S$ ...
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48 views

How strong is the force of space expansion?

There are many questions about space expansion, its cause, or its effects. But I have the feeling we never get straight and simple answers. I do not expect answers to be simple in general, but I ...
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45 views

Maxwell's equation for non inertial observer

Applying Maxwell's equation we can prove that light will move at the speed of light for every inertial frame, is it true as well for non-inertial frames? How light moves slowly near a black hole??
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6answers
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Trouble understanding the concept of true and apparent weight

I need help understanding the concept of true weight vs apparent weight. I understand this much: if someone is standing in an elevator on a scale, the further up they go the less the reading on the ...
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45 views

Energy usage in different reference frames

Imagine a moving object at constant speed (like a car). This object is, then, accelerated for a brief moment. In different reference frames (at rest and moving along with the object), the variation of ...
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42 views

Why don't clocks on a train read the same time?

Two clocks are positioned at the ends of a train of length $L$ (as measured in its own frame). They are synchronized in the train frame. The train travels past you at speed $v$. It turns out ...
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Particle acceleration at magnetized shocks by convective electric fields?

Let us assume we have a flow of charged particles in a quasi-neutral state (i.e., a plasma) convecting at some speed, $\mathbf{V}_{sw}$ = V$_{sw}$ $\hat{x}$, and the particles have species-dependent ...
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Vertical Travelling - Taking Advantage of Earth's Rotation [duplicate]

As per our current scientific knowledge the earth rotates on its axis and it rotates at a speed of 1670 kilometers/hour. This decreases by the cosine of your latitude so that at a latitude of 45 ...
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56 views

Timelike curves in Special Relativity

I have a question that probably might sound silly to most of you. We know that a natural Lorentz-invariant parametrization of a timelike curve is provided by: $$\tau$$ the Lorentz-invariant proper ...
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A few questions on passive vs active Lorentz transformations

1.) How do we physically interpret an active Lorentz transformation? The passive transformation seems simple enough: you view a fixed object from the perspective of a new observer. When we actively ...
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72 views

Time Dilation Problem [closed]

I'm having some trouble using the time dilation formula. Say an astronaut leaves Earth for 10 years, at 0.85c. How much time has passed according to an observer on Earth? I tried using the ...
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Should I abandon my thought experiment about time?

I'm trying to think about special relativity without "spoiling" it by looking up the answer; I hope someone can offer some insight - or at least tell me I'm wrong. Suppose I have an ordinary clock ...
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1answer
90 views

Don't Inertial forces obey Newton's third law? [duplicate]

I read in a book (Fundamentals of Mechanics by IE Irodov) that inertial forces do not obey newton's third law. I am unable to imagine and get this in my mind. It states: "Inertial forces are not ...
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1answer
91 views

How can one always be standing still when compared to the speed of light?

I was thinking if I built a device with 7 clocks, synchronized to each other, one in the middle, one up, down, left, right, behind and in front of me, say 1 meter away, and I fired a laser from the ...
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If everything is relative to each other in this universe, why do we keep the Sun to be the reference point?

and study the solar system and universe relative to it and why not relative to the Earth?
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Refractive index of dielectric in different frames of reference

The setup A transparent isotropic dielectric medium moving in the negative $x'$ direction at speed $v$ in frame $S'$ is stationary in frame $S$, where it has refractive index $n$. In other words, ...
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Coulomb's Law- Why the Coulomb's law is valid only for point and static charges?

Why the coulomb's law is valid only for point and static charges? Is there is any definite reason?
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72 views

Why doesn't a car slide down a banked road when there is no friction?

In case of banked roads without friction, there is an additional $mg \sin(\theta)$ which is unbalanced. Why isn't this taken into account because it is responsible for making the vehicle slide down ...
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30 views

Pseudoforce and friction: confusion

Consider the following situation. A block of mass $M$ is resting on a rough horizontal ground, and a frame is moving towards the right horizontally with an acceleration $a$. Suppose the coefficient of ...
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Question about Origins in Galilean transformation

I'm just learning about relativity, and every equation I see for a galilean transformation of frame $S'$ (moving with uniform velocity in the $x$-direction with respect to frame $S$) is $x'=x-vt$, ...
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108 views

What distance does one travels in his lifetime? [closed]

I think this isn't answerable without having point of reference from which speed at which earth travels in space, however if I am wrong the please give absolute distance. Considering that earth spins ...
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Perceiving travel speeds from different view points

Scenario: Two vehicles pass each other on a highway moving at 100km's an hour; from a stationary position beside the road you witness these cars pass each-other directly in front of you: from your ...
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Foucault pendulum initial velocity

This is a basic question I can't solve and it seems it is not addressed on the web. Sorry for my lame painting skills. Assume we have a foucault pendulum suspended in the north pole. the pivot is ...
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Inertial frames

I'm just starting my study of relativity, and I have a rough understanding of the connection between inertial frames, newton's laws, and galilean transformations, but I'd probably benefit more if ...
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Conservation of energy in a different frame of reference

Consider a rollercoaster that goes down a slope: At the higher level it has speed $v_0$, then it goes down a slope and at the end it has speed $v_0 + \Delta v$. The carriage is not powered and has ...
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4answers
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What do you exactly mean when you say that momentum is conserved?

I am taking for granted that when we say that something is conserved it is understood 'in its full integrity'. Energy is represented by a number (of J, or other) and is usually conserved. But ...
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1answer
72 views

Conservation of linear momentum, when is it conserved?

Will Linear momentum be conserved in a non-inertial frame of reference? In other words what is the fundamental condition for linear momentum to be conserved? Also which is more fundamental- Newton's ...
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342 views

Centrifugal force affecting satellite

I'm trying to explain the behaviour of a geostationary satellite using different frames of reference. Inertial frame: The satellite has a circular motion with angular velocity $\omega$. The ...
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Gauge formalism in rigid body mechanics

When doing calculations in rigid body mechanics, it is necessary to choose an origin to calculate torques and angular momenta. However, the underlying dynamics does not depend upon the choice of that ...
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1answer
76 views

Rotation from Goldstein's Classical Mechanics

I apologize for the ambiguity in my title. It was rather difficult to figure out what is the most appropriate title for my questions. My questions come from chapter 4 and chapter 5 of Goldstein, ...
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Is “now” or “the present moment” properly defined in GR?

My question is about the extent to which "now" is defined in GR. In Minkowski spacetime, it's possible to define a "now" for an inertial observer by finding a spacelike 3-plane such that, in the ...
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Does this count as moving faster than light?

I'm not familiar with any complicated physics equation, however I do understand some basics. Suppose there is two objects, both of them are moving away from each other in a 3-dimensional space, which ...
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How do we know that clocks slow down relative to each other? [duplicate]

For example if a body in motion experiences time dilation, why does it see a body at rest slow down relative to it? wouldn't it make more sense if the body at rest has a faster clock relative to it?
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Magnetic force and relative frame

The magnetic field for to a moving charge depend on its velocity (Biot Savart's law). My question is that is it then not frame dependent? If it is, it means if a man is walking and other is standing ...
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Is centrifugal force equal in magnitude to the centripetal force in the frame of a body undergoing circular motion?

I was working out the minimum tangential velocity required for a swing to complete a full revolution and assumed the centripetal force is equal to the centrifugal force, so that I could set the weight ...
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Beginner question: timelessness of massless particles [duplicate]

I am not very familiar with the quirkiness of relativity, and I was wondering how to explain this situation. If a beam of light is shining at some object at some distance from the origin of the beam, ...
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What is the relative acceleration of a projectile fired at in a low gravity vacuum?

This question is to end an old argument. Given a (space) vehicle with an acceleration of X, and projectile with an acceleration of 2X (rocket, not bullet), what would the relative acceleration of the ...
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1answer
61 views

How to determine satellite position in J2000 from latitude, longitude and distance from Earth?

Due to my task of writing orbit prediction routines I am trying to understand the reference frames better and how to use them ( particularly for Earth orbits ). I think I get the idea of what ECI ...
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1answer
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The particle content of a given state

In Carroll's we read ...The Unruh effect teaches us the most important lesson of Quantum Field Theory (QFT) in curved spacetime, the idea that "vacuum" and "particles" are observer-dependent ...
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How to differentiate between rotating frame and linearly accelerating frame?

Two friends, $A$ and $B$ are part of an experiment. $A$ is placed in a closed box and made to accelerate in free space at an acceleration $g$. $B$ is also placed in a closed box, but is made to rotate ...
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Free vs bound vectors and torque

When considering basic Newtonian mechanics, we can treat vector as free and move their point of application at will. This is consistent with the affine nature of Euclidean space. However, when ...
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67 views

Special relativity: circumventing velocity-addition formula

Two spaceships approach an observer from an equal distance and from an opposite direction with an equal speed $v$ in the observer's intertial reference frame $O$. The speed of a spaceship in the ...
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Static Friction on a Circular Road [duplicate]

I was recently brushing up on my dynamics, when I saw the interpretation of how a car moves in a circular road. Apparently, the car can stay in a circle due to static friction acting inwards. But I ...
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How the Bloch sphere of a Hahn echo in NMR looks like? 90-t-90-t-echo

I have tried to find in the literature a proper nice and beautiful Bloch sphere to describe the trajectory of a nuclear spin, starting in z-axis, using a pulse sequence of an initial 90º pulse with ...
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83 views

Experimental Verification of No Special Frames of Reference

Certainly, there have been numerous tests of both Special Relativity and General Relativity. Given all the phenomena and behavior stipulated by Relativity, one could perhaps divide these phenomena ...
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Quantitative relation between two charges moving in parallel in two frames of reference

The relevant question is here. The accepted answer may have explained my question in a descriptive manner. However, I want to see how things are related quantitatively. Imagine we have two charges ...
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What is $c + (-c)$?

If object A is moving at velocity $v$ (normalized so that $c=1$) relative to a ground observer emits object B at velocity $w$ relative to A, the velocity of B relative to the ground observer is $$ v ...