A reference frame is a particular coordinate system chosen to represent physical entities. The notion is most often used in special and general relativity to dentoe particular coordinates chosen on the spacetime manifold.

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Cosmic Rest Frame

Cosmic Rest Frame is defined in the paper "Adventures in Friedmann cosmology :A detailed expansion of cosmological Friedmann equations" by R Nemiroff and B Patla as the frame at a point where average ...
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Can an accelerometer be used to determine orientation of a rocket under power?

I saw a project on Hackaday featuring a model rocket with moveable fins to stabilize the rocket's trajectory: Hackaday. The goal was to arc the rocket to a horizontal trajectory and keep it there. In ...
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Rotation of a vector

Is a vector necessarily changed when it is rotated through an angle? I think a vector always gets changed because its projection will change, and also its inclination with axes will always change. ...
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Is magnetism just electricity in a different FoR?

I am trying to understand magnetism and its relation to electricity: Suppose there are two electrons travelling side by side in deep space at 1 cm distance at .99 c In this article it is said that ...
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Intuitive understanding of vector spaces [on hold]

I want to understand the intuitive meaning of vector spaces (Hilbert, Banach, metric, normed). I have read a lot of texts and understand the mathematical formalism given but how does it correspond to ...
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Why is the centripetal force vector on a banked turn horizontal rather than parallel to the incline?

Why isn't the centripetal force parallel to the inclined surface? It seems like if you were to draw a circle with one point being at the center of the curve and one point at the car the circle would ...
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Experiment proving that the Earth is rotating around the Sun [duplicate]

Is there any simple experiment done on Earth proving that the Earth is rotating around the Sun? Something in the same spirit of what Foucault did proving that the Earth is rotating around itself. ...
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Gravity & centripetal force [on hold]

Ok - My question rephrased, how are these three fundamental forces unified ? The Earth spins at a certain rate, it must follow that any object not attached must experience an out ward thrust. The ...
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Does the constancy of the speed of light in vacuum hold for any observer in GR as well?

From SR, we know that the speed of light in a vacuum is the same for all observers, regardless of the motion of the light source. But in GR, does it still hold for all observers? I mean the constancy ...
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Euler's equations (rotating frames)

I'm trying to understand the Euler's equations and I'm having problems with rotating frames and on which specific frame is each quantity measured. On the equation $$ ...
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What is the maximum speed without skidding on a circular path? [closed]

What is the condition that the body going on the circular path will skid if its speed is increasing at a constant rate, say a? I need a free body diagram too.
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How does acceleration feel compared to gravitational pull?

I was debating a variation of this Phys.SE question with a friend. The original question is: "If you had your eyes closed, could you distinguish between standing still on earth and being in a ...
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Earth, Sun and beginner's reference frames

In the post-Newton era, where "absolute space" is not absolute, how is the reference frame in which "the Earth moves round the Sun" accurately defined?
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Relation between two clocks in two different Reference frames [closed]

I'm beginning to study Special Relativity and I'm a bit confused with Lorentz transformations. Here's my doubt. Imagine two reference frames, $S$ and $S'$, and suppose $S'$ to be moving at a velocity ...
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Different forms of centripetal acceleration

For a circular motion centripetal acceleration can be expressed as $$a_{c}=\frac{v^2}{R} \hat{u_N}\tag{1}$$ Where $\hat{u_n}$ is the normal unit vector. Nevertheless in the expression for ...
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Principal axis of inertia parallel to the ones passing through the center of mass

Consider a rigid body and the (at least) three axes of inertia passing through its center of mass. Will any other axis not passing through the center of mass but parallel to one of the principal axes ...
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Parallel axis theorem and Koenig theorem for angular momentum

Are the parallel axis theorem and the Koenig theorem for angular momentum linked with each other in rigid body dynamics? The parallel axis theorem states that $$I_{z}=I_{cm}+ma^2$$ Koenig theorem ...
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Circular motion on rotating body

Theory of circular motion is described at many references, such as https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Circular_motion. In this case, a body performs circular motion on a stationary path. For example, a car ...
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Why is the center of mass frame always used in rigid body dynamics?

In most of the cases the center of mass is chosen for rigid body motion description, but this is not an obliged choice, since the motion of any point $P$ of the rigid body can be seen as the ...
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Is the acceleration due to a fictitious force independent of mass in general?

Intuitively (at least to me) it seems that the answer should be "yes", since a fictitious force arises due to being in a non-inertial frame; the frame is accelerating, but the objects within this ...
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Black holes shouldn't really exist? [duplicate]

General relativity states that for an observer sufficiently far from the gravitational field of a blackhole, the space time geodesic nearr the event horizon is so long that we should never observe an ...
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Need help visualising this

I was reading Irodov's mechanics (https://archive.org/details/IrodovMechanics) and when explaining rotation about a fixed axis he wrote Imagine a solid performing two elementary rotations, $d\vec ...
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Acceleration of moving reference frame

I want to simulate the readings of an accelerometer that is arbitrarily moved through 3D space. In an inertial reference frame $W$, the motion of the accelerometer is described by it's linear ...
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The two causes for the factor 2 in Coriolis effect

While reading this document on Coriolis effect http://empslocal.ex.ac.uk/people/staff/gv219/classics.d/Persson98.pdf, I saw the followig sentence Two kinematic effects each contribute half of the ...
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Proof derivative of a vector following precession motion

I do not get some points of this proof about the time derivative of a unit vector $\hat{u}$ (costant magnitude) which is following a precession motion. The picture is the following. I want to ...
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Orbiting in space (free fall) and centripetal force?

So basically astronauts are weightless b/c they are free falling. But to get to that state they need to be moving real fast. So why doesn't that speed along with the centripetal force affect them? I ...
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Meaning of centrifugal term in the mechanical energy of a orbiting planet [duplicate]

For a planet under the effect of gravitational force the mechanical energy can be written as $$E=\frac{1}{2}\mu {\dot{r}}^2+\frac{L^2}{2\mu r^2}-\gamma \frac{m M}{r^2} \tag{1}$$ Where $\mu$ is the ...
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Does a black hole really slow down time?

When an object gets pulled into a black hole it seems to slow and stop, but could it be possibly be because the speed of light that hit the object and came back was slowing down as the object got ...
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Effect of Coriolis force

Is Coriolis force fictitious in an inertial frame or not? If so can it be mathematically deduced using an inertial frame as reference?
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Why does the water in a bucket stay even when swung around in circular motion? [duplicate]

What are the force that act on the water and which force is responsible to keep the water from falling out?
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Some questions about forces

If I am sitting inside a closed sphere (I can't see the outside), can't I feel when the sphere is at constant speed ? Can I feel when it is accelerating ? Why ? The defination of force given ...
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Is it always possible for an observer to realize to be in a non-inertial frame?

Galilean relativity principle states that two frames moving with uniform linear motion cannot be distinguished. But is it always possible to realize to be in a non-inertial frame? In a rotating frame ...
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Understanding the derivation of equation of motion in rotating frame

Next, we consider how the change of any vector during a small time-interval $\Delta t$ can be expressed as the vector sum of two contributions: The change that would occur if it were ...
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Rotational relativity? Is there an universal frame of reference for rotation?

So, there is obviously no such thing as an universal frame of reference for velocity. According to the relativity theory, there is no difference between two observers moving with respect to each ...
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Physical interpretation of Coriolis terms in acceleration

Consider a reference frame which is rotating (for example on a carousel) and a steady inertial frame, with the same origin. $\vec{r}=\vec{r'}$ $\vec{v}=\vec{v'}+\vec{\Omega}\times\vec{r'}$ ...
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Meaning of parallel axis theorem: why is the moment of inertia minimum if the axis passes through the CM?

From parallel axis theorem follows that, given a rigid body, the moment of inertia is minimum if calculated with respect to an axis passing through the center of mass. What is the physical meaning of ...
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energy of the system increasing after acceleration (one reference frame)

The system consists of small mass $m$, large mass $M$, and chemical potential energy $E_{chem}$, as shown in below image, the reference frame is following the small mass throughout. The total energy ...
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How is this conflict about age of the universe resolved?

In a previous Phys.SE question, Does a spaceship travelling at near lightspeed see the universe aging slow or fast?, the answer (which was followed by a proof involving co-moving reference frames) was ...
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Rapid acceleration does what to inertial frame clocks?

I'm 10 light years from Earth and see Earth's clock/calendar reading 2000, including light travel time. In other words, I assume it's 2010 on Earth, but what I actually see is the year 2000 due to ...
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Kinetic energy of rotating rigid body

Sorry for boring you my friends. I am haunted by a problem of kinetic energy of rotating rigid body. Usually, the kinetic energy is calculated in the attached body reference. Because we could take the ...
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Is polar coordinates frame non-inertial?

Consider the acceleration expressed in polar coordinates. $ \left( \ddot r - r\dot\varphi^2 \right) \hat{\mathbf r} + \left( r\ddot\varphi + 2\dot r \dot\varphi \right) \hat{\boldsymbol{\varphi}} ...
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In rotating frames, particles do not travel at constant velocity?

If we measure a particle's trajectory in a rotating frame of reference as $\vec x=\vec x(t)$, then $\frac{d^2\vec x}{dt^2}=0$ could be zero? I'm trying to explain why the Newton's first law of ...
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Regarding relativity of simultaneity

I recently started studying Special Relativity an my book discusses the following: Say I have synchronized two separated clocks in a reference frame S, if then an observer in another reference frame ...
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Special Relativity and Composition Law for Velocities with respect to an observer watching two objects moving away from a central point

So I understand that special relativity is all about the frame of reference and there is a lot to do with time dilation and how space-time is warped at velocities near $c$. So my question is what ...
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A body acting by zero net external force

I wonder, for a rigid body, if the vector sum of all external forces acting on it equals zero (Fnet = 0), does it also leads to the vector sum of all external torques acting on it about any point ...
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About reference frame in Newton's second law?

Classical physics models events occuring in the spacetime $\mathcal E\times \mathcal T$ where $\mathcal E$ is a dimension 3 euclidean point space and $\mathcal T$ is an interval of $(\mathbb R, ...
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Rapid (ac/de)celeration in relativity does what to inertial clocks?

EDIT (to clarify my question): I think some of the answers here are accounting for light travel time and telling me what I'd actually see on Earth's clock, so I've edited my first paragraph to ...
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Does the centrifugal force affect stationary objects as seen from the inertial reference frame?

If an object is moving at the same speed as a rotating/accelerating frame of reference it's in contact with but in the opposite direction (making its displacement zero), would such an object be ...
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A question about the famous bucket experiment

Suppose that we have a bucket containing two liquids with different densities.Suppose also that i connect the bucket with an electric motor and i rotate the bucket. Why when the bucket rotates, the ...
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Difference between potential centrifugal energy and rotational/kinetic energy

I'm having troubles to understand the difference between kinetic energy and potential centrifugal energy in some situations. I make an example where I am confused. A object moves on a rod attached ...