A reference frame is a particular coordinate system chosen to represent physical entities. The notion is most often used in special and general relativity to dentoe particular coordinates chosen on the spacetime manifold.

learn more… | top users | synonyms (1)

1
vote
1answer
47 views

What wilI I observe when travelling at almost the speed of light? [duplicate]

If I and a group of friends are travelling at or just below the speed of light - can I see myself, can I see them, or they me? Would we see anything at all?
0
votes
0answers
27 views

A flight attendant on a plane - special relativity problem [on hold]

the question goes like this: on a plane, flying at 0.8c which is 100m long (in plane system), at the back of the plane there is a flight attendant moving at 0.55c (relativitly to the plane system). ...
0
votes
0answers
38 views

How can light have the same speed for all observers? [duplicate]

I'm a little confused on this. If you're travelling at, say, 10% of the speed of light then light is travelling at 3x10^8 ms^(-1) relative to you. If you're moving at 80% of the speed of light and ...
2
votes
2answers
107 views

Why do electrons orbit protons? [duplicate]

I was wondering why electrons orbited protons rather than protons orbiting electrons. My first thought was that it was due to the small amount of gravitational attraction between them that would ...
1
vote
1answer
66 views

How does EM radition depend on the reference frame?

In special relativity, magnetism is electrostatics in a different reference frame. This is how we explain the magnetic field being produced by moving charges (aka currents). Charges that move produce ...
1
vote
2answers
39 views

Effect of movements of astronauts on International Space Station

I know that astronauts move in and around in ISS. When they move they also touch the modules of ISS and sometimes they apply force on the module to move. When this happens, as far as I know it affects ...
0
votes
1answer
42 views

How can we assume that reaching the speed of light slows down time? [duplicate]

How can we assume that gaining the speed of light slows down time?
1
vote
2answers
31 views

What does torque depend upon?

What does torque depend upon? I know torque depends on force and moment arm, but does it depend on choice of origin? Because I think choice of origin determines its moment arm.
0
votes
2answers
69 views

If rest mass does not change with $v$ then why is infinite energy required to accelerate an object to the speed of light?

I know that as the velocity increases, the mass of the object also increases so it becomes tougher and tougher to move the object which ultimately leads to a requirement of infinite energy to ...
0
votes
2answers
40 views

In a CMCS 2-body system, why does the speed of the particles after collision stay the same?

A particle $m_1$ is traveling with velocity $v$ toward a stationary particle $m_2$. The velocity of the center of mass is given as $v_c=\frac{m_1}{m_1+m_2}v$. Changing to a moving coordinate system, ...
-4
votes
1answer
36 views

Why isn't time axis vertical? [on hold]

Why isn't time axis vertical? I don't find any reason behind it. This graph is drawn in tree frame. Though the tree isn't moving the time axis isn't vertical. Please help me to understand it. This ...
0
votes
0answers
51 views

What does traveling close to speed of light mean?

This has been bugging me for a while. We all know in relativity that if you travel close to speed of light, all sorts of crazy things happen. But what does it mean to travel close to speed of light? ...
2
votes
4answers
147 views

The pole and the barn paradox (stretching the pole)

The basic variant of this paradox makes sense to me but I have problems in proving mathematically variation of this non-paradox. So lets imagine that we have barn and pole which is stationary to the ...
0
votes
1answer
48 views

Lorentz Transformation at t=0

Suppose I have two reference frames $S$ and $S'$, where $S'$ is moving with velocity $v$ with respect to $S$. The Lorentz transformation equation for time in reference frame $S$ is given by: ...
4
votes
1answer
48 views

What does a relativistically moving capacitor “look” like?

Suppose I have a parallel plate capacitor with a vacuum between the plates, a voltage $V$ across them and a capacitance of $C$. What will this arrangement look like to an observer in a uniformly ...
3
votes
1answer
87 views

Vector fields and tensors in E&M

I'm confused by a very basic property of electric fields. The electric field is a vector field. Vectors are tensors. Wikipedia has the following statement in the article about the electromagnetic ...
1
vote
1answer
49 views

Fictitious forces and $\omega$

I have been studying fictitious forces, such as the centrifugal force and Coriolis force. The equation for the centrifugal force is given by: $$F_{centrifugal}=-m\omega\times(\omega\times r)$$ My ...
4
votes
2answers
76 views

Can time be interacted with? [duplicate]

Astronauts come back to Earth younger than they would have been had they stayed on Earth for that same period of time. They are traveling so fast relative to the Earth that time slows down for them. ...
1
vote
0answers
30 views

Moment of Inertia of Polygons in the Plane [closed]

I was reading this link, which describes a method of finding the moment of inertia of a general convex polygon by splitting it into triangles. I then realized I have no idea on how to derive a such a ...
0
votes
0answers
24 views

How can the clock c1 be synchronized with the clock c2?

A clock c1 is situated at a distance $L$ from an observer carrying a clock c1. How can the clock c1 be synchronized with the clock c2?
1
vote
1answer
50 views

Why do we write the lengths in the following way? Question about Lorentz transformation

Yesterday we have studied the Lorentz transformation in school. So we have two frames of reference, $S$ and $S'$ . $S$ is stationary and $S'$. $S'$ has a constant velocity $v$, relative to the $S$ ...
0
votes
0answers
61 views

How strong is the force of space expansion?

There are many questions about space expansion, its cause, or its effects. But I have the feeling we never get straight and simple answers. I do not expect answers to be simple in general, but I ...
2
votes
1answer
53 views

Maxwell's equation for non inertial observer

Applying Maxwell's equation we can prove that light will move at the speed of light for every inertial frame, is it true as well for non-inertial frames? How light moves slowly near a black hole??
2
votes
6answers
227 views

Trouble understanding the concept of true and apparent weight

I need help understanding the concept of true weight vs apparent weight. I understand this much: if someone is standing in an elevator on a scale, the further up they go the less the reading on the ...
4
votes
1answer
48 views

Energy usage in different reference frames

Imagine a moving object at constant speed (like a car). This object is, then, accelerated for a brief moment. In different reference frames (at rest and moving along with the object), the variation of ...
2
votes
1answer
49 views

Why don't clocks on a train read the same time?

Two clocks are positioned at the ends of a train of length $L$ (as measured in its own frame). They are synchronized in the train frame. The train travels past you at speed $v$. It turns out ...
2
votes
0answers
40 views

Particle acceleration at magnetized shocks by convective electric fields?

Let us assume we have a flow of charged particles in a quasi-neutral state (i.e., a plasma) convecting at some speed, $\mathbf{V}_{sw}$ = V$_{sw}$ $\hat{x}$, and the particles have species-dependent ...
0
votes
0answers
103 views

Vertical Travelling - Taking Advantage of Earth's Rotation [duplicate]

As per our current scientific knowledge the earth rotates on its axis and it rotates at a speed of 1670 kilometers/hour. This decreases by the cosine of your latitude so that at a latitude of 45 ...
1
vote
1answer
62 views

Timelike curves in Special Relativity

I have a question that probably might sound silly to most of you. We know that a natural Lorentz-invariant parametrization of a timelike curve is provided by: $$\tau$$ the Lorentz-invariant proper ...
2
votes
2answers
138 views

A few questions on passive vs active Lorentz transformations

1.) How do we physically interpret an active Lorentz transformation? The passive transformation seems simple enough: you view a fixed object from the perspective of a new observer. When we actively ...
0
votes
1answer
90 views

Time Dilation Problem [closed]

I'm having some trouble using the time dilation formula. Say an astronaut leaves Earth for 10 years, at 0.85c. How much time has passed according to an observer on Earth? I tried using the ...
23
votes
6answers
6k views

Should I abandon my thought experiment about time?

I'm trying to think about special relativity without "spoiling" it by looking up the answer; I hope someone can offer some insight - or at least tell me I'm wrong. Suppose I have an ordinary clock ...
0
votes
1answer
100 views

Don't Inertial forces obey Newton's third law? [duplicate]

I read in a book (Fundamentals of Mechanics by IE Irodov) that inertial forces do not obey newton's third law. I am unable to imagine and get this in my mind. It states: "Inertial forces are not ...
2
votes
1answer
98 views

How can one always be standing still when compared to the speed of light?

I was thinking if I built a device with 7 clocks, synchronized to each other, one in the middle, one up, down, left, right, behind and in front of me, say 1 meter away, and I fired a laser from the ...
3
votes
5answers
1k views

If everything is relative to each other in this universe, why do we keep the Sun to be the reference point?

and study the solar system and universe relative to it and why not relative to the Earth?
3
votes
2answers
108 views

Refractive index of dielectric in different frames of reference

The setup A transparent isotropic dielectric medium moving in the negative $x'$ direction at speed $v$ in frame $S'$ is stationary in frame $S$, where it has refractive index $n$. In other words, ...
1
vote
3answers
95 views

Coulomb's Law- Why the Coulomb's law is valid only for point and static charges?

Why the coulomb's law is valid only for point and static charges? Is there is any definite reason?
0
votes
2answers
81 views

Why doesn't a car slide down a banked road when there is no friction?

In case of banked roads without friction, there is an additional $mg \sin(\theta)$ which is unbalanced. Why isn't this taken into account because it is responsible for making the vehicle slide down ...
1
vote
1answer
31 views

Pseudoforce and friction: confusion

Consider the following situation. A block of mass $M$ is resting on a rough horizontal ground, and a frame is moving towards the right horizontally with an acceleration $a$. Suppose the coefficient of ...
2
votes
0answers
53 views

Question about Origins in Galilean transformation

I'm just learning about relativity, and every equation I see for a galilean transformation of frame $S'$ (moving with uniform velocity in the $x$-direction with respect to frame $S$) is $x'=x-vt$, ...
0
votes
1answer
113 views

What distance does one travels in his lifetime? [closed]

I think this isn't answerable without having point of reference from which speed at which earth travels in space, however if I am wrong the please give absolute distance. Considering that earth spins ...
0
votes
3answers
50 views

Perceiving travel speeds from different view points

Scenario: Two vehicles pass each other on a highway moving at 100km's an hour; from a stationary position beside the road you witness these cars pass each-other directly in front of you: from your ...
4
votes
3answers
87 views

Foucault pendulum initial velocity

This is a basic question I can't solve and it seems it is not addressed on the web. Sorry for my lame painting skills. Assume we have a foucault pendulum suspended in the north pole. the pivot is ...
1
vote
2answers
91 views

Inertial frames

I'm just starting my study of relativity, and I have a rough understanding of the connection between inertial frames, newton's laws, and galilean transformations, but I'd probably benefit more if ...
2
votes
2answers
69 views

Conservation of energy in a different frame of reference

Consider a rollercoaster that goes down a slope: At the higher level it has speed $v_0$, then it goes down a slope and at the end it has speed $v_0 + \Delta v$. The carriage is not powered and has ...
2
votes
1answer
94 views

Conservation of linear momentum, when is it conserved?

Will Linear momentum be conserved in a non-inertial frame of reference? In other words what is the fundamental condition for linear momentum to be conserved? Also which is more fundamental- Newton's ...
5
votes
1answer
357 views

Centrifugal force affecting satellite

I'm trying to explain the behaviour of a geostationary satellite using different frames of reference. Inertial frame: The satellite has a circular motion with angular velocity $\omega$. The ...
2
votes
0answers
35 views

Gauge formalism in rigid body mechanics

When doing calculations in rigid body mechanics, it is necessary to choose an origin to calculate torques and angular momenta. However, the underlying dynamics does not depend upon the choice of that ...
2
votes
1answer
83 views

Rotation from Goldstein's Classical Mechanics

I apologize for the ambiguity in my title. It was rather difficult to figure out what is the most appropriate title for my questions. My questions come from chapter 4 and chapter 5 of Goldstein, ...
12
votes
3answers
792 views

Is “now” or “the present moment” properly defined in GR?

My question is about the extent to which "now" is defined in GR. In Minkowski spacetime, it's possible to define a "now" for an inertial observer by finding a spacelike 3-plane such that, in the ...