A reference frame is a particular coordinate system chosen to represent physical entities. The notion is most often used in special and general relativity to dentoe particular coordinates chosen on the spacetime manifold.

learn more… | top users | synonyms (1)

2
votes
0answers
27 views

Gauge formalism in rigid body mechanics

When doing calculations in rigid body mechanics, it is necessary to choose an origin to calculate torques and angular momenta. However, the underlying dynamics does not depend upon the choice of that ...
2
votes
1answer
53 views

Rotation from Goldstein's Classical Mechanics

I apologize for the ambiguity in my title. It was rather difficult to figure out what is the most appropriate title for my questions. My questions come from chapter 4 and chapter 5 of Goldstein, ...
12
votes
3answers
748 views

Is “now” or “the present moment” properly defined in GR?

My question is about the extent to which "now" is defined in GR. In Minkowski spacetime, it's possible to define a "now" for an inertial observer by finding a spacelike 3-plane such that, in the ...
1
vote
3answers
135 views

Does this count as moving faster than light?

I'm not familiar with any complicated physics equation, however I do understand some basics. Suppose there is two objects, both of them are moving away from each other in a 3-dimensional space, which ...
1
vote
2answers
72 views

How do we know that clocks slow down relative to each other? [duplicate]

For example if a body in motion experiences time dilation, why does it see a body at rest slow down relative to it? wouldn't it make more sense if the body at rest has a faster clock relative to it?
0
votes
2answers
29 views

Magnetic force and relative frame

The magnetic field for to a moving charge depend on its velocity (Biot Savart's law). My question is that is it then not frame dependent? If it is, it means if a man is walking and other is standing ...
0
votes
2answers
28 views

Is centrifugal force equal in magnitude to the centripetal force in the frame of a body undergoing circular motion?

I was working out the minimum tangential velocity required for a swing to complete a full revolution and assumed the centripetal force is equal to the centrifugal force, so that I could set the weight ...
1
vote
2answers
68 views

Beginner question: timelessness of massless particles [duplicate]

I am not very familiar with the quirkiness of relativity, and I was wondering how to explain this situation. If a beam of light is shining at some object at some distance from the origin of the beam, ...
1
vote
2answers
108 views

What is the relative acceleration of a projectile fired at in a low gravity vacuum?

This question is to end an old argument. Given a (space) vehicle with an acceleration of X, and projectile with an acceleration of 2X (rocket, not bullet), what would the relative acceleration of the ...
3
votes
1answer
26 views

How to determine satellite position in J2000 from latitude, longitude and distance from Earth?

Due to my task of writing orbit prediction routines I am trying to understand the reference frames better and how to use them ( particularly for Earth orbits ). I think I get the idea of what ECI ...
4
votes
1answer
69 views

The particle content of a given state

In Carroll's we read ...The Unruh effect teaches us the most important lesson of Quantum Field Theory (QFT) in curved spacetime, the idea that "vacuum" and "particles" are observer-dependent ...
1
vote
3answers
47 views

How to differentiate between rotating frame and linearly accelerating frame?

Two friends, $A$ and $B$ are part of an experiment. $A$ is placed in a closed box and made to accelerate in free space at an acceleration $g$. $B$ is also placed in a closed box, but is made to rotate ...
1
vote
2answers
39 views

Free vs bound vectors and torque

When considering basic Newtonian mechanics, we can treat vector as free and move their point of application at will. This is consistent with the affine nature of Euclidean space. However, when ...
1
vote
1answer
59 views

Special relativity: circumventing velocity-addition formula

Two spaceships approach an observer from an equal distance and from an opposite direction with an equal speed $v$ in the observer's intertial reference frame $O$. The speed of a spaceship in the ...
1
vote
0answers
21 views

Static Friction on a Circular Road [duplicate]

I was recently brushing up on my dynamics, when I saw the interpretation of how a car moves in a circular road. Apparently, the car can stay in a circle due to static friction acting inwards. But I ...
1
vote
0answers
20 views

How the Bloch sphere of a Hahn echo in NMR looks like? 90-t-90-t-echo

I have tried to find in the literature a proper nice and beautiful Bloch sphere to describe the trajectory of a nuclear spin, starting in z-axis, using a pulse sequence of an initial 90º pulse with ...
0
votes
2answers
68 views

Experimental Verification of No Special Frames of Reference

Certainly, there have been numerous tests of both Special Relativity and General Relativity. Given all the phenomena and behavior stipulated by Relativity, one could perhaps divide these phenomena ...
1
vote
1answer
42 views

Quantitative relation between two charges moving in parallel in two frames of reference

The relevant question is here. The accepted answer may have explained my question in a descriptive manner. However, I want to see how things are related quantitatively. Imagine we have two charges ...
6
votes
7answers
288 views

What is $c + (-c)$?

If object A is moving at velocity $v$ (normalized so that $c=1$) relative to a ground observer emits object B at velocity $w$ relative to A, the velocity of B relative to the ground observer is $$ v ...
0
votes
3answers
63 views

Is time not a universal parameter, really, in special relativity?

I want to check that I get it right. The way that I have it in my mind is that, in my frame of reference and from my point of view, SR associates only one time parameter for the whole space, and not ...
2
votes
4answers
120 views

Why would the apple fall under the tree?

Here is an extremely naive question: Why would the apple fall under the tree? I am puzzled by this, because the conventional answer that the gravity between the apple and the earth pulling apple down ...
27
votes
5answers
3k views

What do you really see on a line of clocks as you pass by them at high speed?

According to my understanding of SR, if I travel at 0.8c relative to a line of clocks, I should see the clocks in front of me going 3 times faster than my own, and those behind me going 3 times slower ...
1
vote
1answer
33 views

Time difference in clocks of an accelerated frame [closed]

If we have two inertial frames $S$ and $S'$ and $S'$ is moving to the right w.r.t. $S$ with a velocity $v$. Suddenly $S$ undergoes negative acceleration (no longer being inertial) and after some time ...
2
votes
2answers
96 views

Is Moon really rotating about its axis?

Wikipedia says yes but on Newtonian arguments. From general relativistic point of view Moon is not rotating but moving along geodesic trajectory. And like parallel transport of a vector (pointing to ...
0
votes
1answer
40 views

Physical laws in all inertial frames

Do there exist physical laws which do not take the same form in all inertial frames?
3
votes
3answers
129 views

How to understand the definition of vector and tensor?

Physics texts like to define vector as something that transform like a vector and tensor as something that transform like a tensor, which is different from the definition in math books. I am having ...
1
vote
1answer
44 views

What would happen to a rocket car in a torus-shaped spaceship that encompasses the earth?

Suppose we built a enormous torus shaped space station that encompasses and leaves about 330 kilometers between it and the earth. So it's radius is about 6,371 kilometers . Obviously, this structure ...
1
vote
1answer
60 views

Bug riding on a ball moving at almost the speed of light [closed]

A ball with a bug on it is thrown at almost the speed of light. The bug looks back and observes the thrower throwing the ball. In the context of special relativity, what is the weight and the height ...
1
vote
2answers
36 views

In terms of physics, does the phrase “time slows down” mean the same thing as “things happen more slowly?”

The common definition of "time" is a type of measurement, like size. But the sentence "size gets bigger" doesn't make any sense. Is "time slows down" an odd phrasing of "events occur more slowly" or ...
2
votes
4answers
100 views

How much could one slow down aging using existing spacecraft?

Imagine that I board a spacecraft and head away from the Earth at top speed until I've aged twenty years, then I turn around and come back. How much younger will I be than the unexciting folk who hung ...
1
vote
0answers
19 views

Twice the speed of light [duplicate]

If you were able to ride along a photon and a second photon passed you in the opposite direction, would what you observe be twice the speed of light? And would that change what you would see of the ...
-5
votes
2answers
116 views

Do the laws of physics that apply to all observers also apply to a non-observer? [closed]

The Timelessness of a photon https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5ELA3ReWQJY An observer's laws of physics are time based. "When you're traveling at the speed of light, time does not exist" - Neil ...
0
votes
3answers
113 views

Twin Paradox speed of light

Twin Paradox Can anyone clarify and or correct the following for me? A space ship is flying at speed v equal to 0.8 times the speed of light. Within the ship are three stations, a transmitter at ...
1
vote
1answer
117 views

GPS Satellite - Special Relativity

I'm going through an old relativity assignment, and I've been asked to calculate the time dilation for a satellite which orbits the earth in 12 hours at 26000km from the surface, and travels at a ...
0
votes
1answer
34 views

What will be the acceleration of an object $A$ when its released by another object $B$ moving with an upward acceleration $a$?

What will be the acceleration of an object $A$ when its released by another object $B$ moving with an upward acceleration $a$? Will the acceleration of the object $A$ be more than the acceleration due ...
1
vote
1answer
68 views

Dropping a ball in a fast moving train

If I drop a ball in a train moving at a constant speed, will it land on the spot I aimed it at or a little away as the train has moved while it was in air? If it lands away, will the observer not know ...
4
votes
3answers
738 views

Ball thrown from a moving train

This is not a question about throwing a ball vertically in a moving train. I am asking what would happen if I throw a ball in a horizontally in a moving train. Assume I am facing an exit door of a ...
1
vote
1answer
33 views

Light cone and order of events?

If one event lies outside the light cone of another, can the events to some observers appear in a different order in one reference frame compared to the other, and is this the only time when this is ...
2
votes
1answer
96 views

Where are the time dilatational effects of orbital motion and gravitational acceleration equal?

Nearly four years ago, upon hearing of the observation of time dilation in two optical atomic clocks at an elevation one metre apart, due to acceleration towards earths centre of gravity by Chou, C. ...
0
votes
3answers
79 views

Problem on speed of light

As I was reading special relativity, my book says the speed of light is $c$ with respect to any other thing. Does that mean the speed of an individual photon is $c$ even with respect to another ...
0
votes
1answer
117 views

Why doesn't light travel instantly? [duplicate]

I've read that the faster you travel in space, the slower you travel in time. And when you reach the speed of light (which we won't be able to) time will stand still. So when light travels at the ...
7
votes
3answers
902 views

Why does time stop in black holes?

Everyone says that time stops in the black hole. It's a "fact". However, I have never heard everyone explaining that. Of course, I know that observer in weaker gravitational field sees that something ...
2
votes
3answers
631 views

Would a craft travelling increasingly close to the speed of light appear to be decelerating?

I've been pondering the implications of time dilation. Is it right to assume that if a craft was travelling at a speed very close to the speed of light (>= 0.9999c for example), that to an external ...
6
votes
6answers
743 views

Why should a (physical) principle be applicable to different systems in different positions in space and time?

This is a question with a philosophical, as well as physical, flavor. Why should a physical principle (or a description of one), be applicable to different systems that can be in different positions ...
1
vote
2answers
79 views

A simple way of calculating Euler Angles from Rotation Matrix — help!

This is a follow up of this question : I have the rotation matrix $$ \left( \begin{matrix} a_{11} & a_{12} & a_{13}\\ a_{21} & a_{22} & a_{23}\\ a_{31} & a_{32} & ...
3
votes
4answers
213 views

Traveling between two planets at rest to one another [duplicate]

If I travel at relativistic speed from planet A to planet B which are at rest relative to one another, I will be younger than people on A or B when I arrive. However how does this mesh with the fact ...
1
vote
2answers
42 views

Euler angles derivation

I have been trying to grasp the idea of Euler angles for a while. Can anyone point out if my understanding is correct or not. Situation: We have 3 axes known as principal axes of inertia which define ...
1
vote
1answer
107 views

Can special relativity be extended such that the frame of a photon makes sense?

Suppose I want to know what the universe looks like from the perspective of a frame of reference moving at $c$ relative to my current frame. As discussed at length in various other questions on this ...
1
vote
1answer
39 views

Kinetic energy of a body rotating on another rotating body

Consider a body which can freely rotate with respect to the inertial frame, and a rotating disk whose axis is fixed in body frame. When applying the lagrangian method (does that make a difference?), ...
1
vote
1answer
67 views

Lorentz transformations, why $t$ and not $t'$?

In the derivation of the Lorentz tranformation you get the fromuls: $$x=k(x'-ut')$$ $$x'=k(x+ut)$$ where $k$ is a constant that is yet to be determied ($k= \frac{1}{\sqrt{1-\frac{u^2}{c^2}}}$) ...