A system of coordinates used as the basis for describing the position and motion of objects

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4answers
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Why are people weightless whilst in orbit around the Earth? ISS? Satellites? [duplicate]

Had physics for 2 years now on highschool, but there is a thing I am wondering about. You know the in the height above the earth surface around where the satellites are (Or the ISS), I've calculated ...
40
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8answers
4k views

Does centrifugal force exist?

Currently in my last year of high school, and I have always been told that centrifugal force does not exist by my physics teachers. Today my girlfriend in the year below asked me what centrifugal ...
0
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1answer
236 views

Weightlessness for astronauts

Well, this question has been puzzling me for kinda long time, many people believe that orbiting astronauts feel weightless because they are "beyond the pull of Earth's gravity"...How far from the ...
75
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8answers
6k views

Why does a helium filled ballon move forward in a car when the car is accelerating?

I noticed that when I had a helium filled, latex ballon inside of my car, it moved forward in the cabin as I accelerated forward. The faster I accelerated forward, the faster the ballon went from the ...
1
vote
1answer
35 views

Reference frame and centrifugal force

Imagine you are on a theme park ride in which you sit in a car and are spun around in a circle, basically like a giant centrifuge. An observer from the outside would say that there is no centrifugal ...
0
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0answers
40 views

What is the age of the Universe from the big-bang light perspective?

What is the age of the Universe from the big-bang light perspective? We all agree that the universe is around 14 billion years, from the perspective of a hypothetical observer moving in a galaxy, ...
0
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1answer
30 views

Rotating frames [on hold]

A bird of mass $m$ is on a merry-go-round of radius $a$ which rotates at constant angular velocity $-\omega_b$ in the $y$ direction. A woman of mass $M$ is on a second merry-go-around of radius $b$ ...
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2answers
38 views

Is the moment of a force the same about any point?

I know that when a body is is equilibrium There is zero resultant force in any direction, i.e. the sum of all the components of all the forces in any direction is zero The sum of the moments about ...
0
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1answer
52 views

Why does moment of force depend on the perpendicular distance?

Couyld anyone explain how the lecturer concluded that $$(\underline{r_2} - \underline{r_1}) \times \underline{H} = \underline{p} \times \underline{H}$$
7
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2answers
225 views

Assuming that the Cosmological Principle is correct, does this imply that the universe possess an empirically privileged reference frame?

OK...before everyone blasts this with references to the relativistic invariance of the physical laws, time dilation, etc let me add some context. Also, I am an amateur with an interest in physics, so ...
0
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1answer
83 views

Derivation of Euler's equations for rigid body rotation

Sorry for using this image, but I thought this was the most convenient way of asking this question. Please zoom in. I do not understand from the line, "Now, in the body frame $T = (T_{x'}, T_{y'}, ...
3
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1answer
163 views

Angular momentum depends on origin?

The angular momentum of a particle rotating about a point is given by $\vec{L} = \vec{r} \times \vec{p}$. Imagine a particle tracing a circular path on a flat table. If I put the origin of my ...
3
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2answers
88 views

Is a particular force different in different frames

Can a particular real force have different magnitude in different frames?
3
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1answer
71 views

Is there a technical term for “meaningfulness” of mathematical operations?

Is there a technical term for "meaningfulness" of mathematical operations? For example, adding vectors that represent forces has a meaning regardless of the coordinate frame, but an elementwise ...
0
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1answer
127 views

Satellites and gravitation

A satellite with mass $m$ orbits a planet of mass $M$ in a circular path with radius $r$ and velocity $v$. Due to some internal technical failure, the satellite breaks into two, similar parts with ...
0
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1answer
44 views

Speed=mass=time? [closed]

I was wondering why objects gain mass with speed? How can we measure speed if there is no truly stationary point to measure from? And if an object comes to a stand still will it loose its mass? ...
-1
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2answers
63 views

The speed of light and unstable matter

Mr.E is on a luxury spaceship travelling about 1/2 the speed of light and finds a cubic lump of unstable matter(attached to a bomb) in his cabin. He of course is an expert with bombs but this device ...
2
votes
2answers
174 views

What is wrong with considering the Atwood machine as a system?

I am confused about a method used in the following problem. There is an arrangement as shown below. The surface is smooth, and the pulleys are light. We have to find the acceleration $a_0$ of $m_1$. ...
2
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0answers
60 views

About the speed of light

If Mr. E is aboard a spaceship traveling near the speed of light the usual reason for the spaceship not going faster than $c$ is the (relativistic) mass of the ship increases without bound, I think. ...
2
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4answers
74 views

Sum of acceleration vectors

If a point mass has some accelerations $\mathbf{a_1} $ and $\mathbf{a_2} $, why is mathematically true that the "total" acceleration is $\mathbf{a}= \mathbf {a_1}+\mathbf {a_2}$?
3
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1answer
71 views

Do particles keep on emitting energy?

Accelerated electrons emit electromagnetic waves, but those at rest do not. So accelerated electrons emit energy and those at rest do not. (At rest hypothetically, I know it is not permissible ...
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2answers
124 views

How a accelerated object sees another accelerated body in Special relativity?

Assume two objects are moving with a constant acceleration $a_1$ and $a_2$, which are the measured accelerations by respective object (or constant force being applied to each of the objects) . My ...
0
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1answer
49 views

Relativistic addition of velocities of spaceships

If Spaceship 1 is traveling at speed $.5c$ relative to Earth, and Spaceship 2 is traveling at speed $.3c$ relative to Earth in the same direction, what does Spaceship 2 see Spaceship 1's speed as? I ...
0
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2answers
150 views

Conservation of mass energy and kinetic energy in different reference frames

With a little work it's easy to show that kinetic energy by itself is not necessarily preserved when switching between frames of reference. And it is my understanding that energy should be preserved ...
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7answers
1k views

If an event happens 10 light years away and we observe it here, did it actually happen 10 years ago?

I'm sorry if this question has been answered a squillion times, I need someone with smarts to explain it to me. If an event happens 10 light years away, and we observe it here, did it actually happen ...
0
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3answers
83 views

Two clocks along different worldlines

I have been reading and watching videos about this subject for a while now. I just can not seem to grasp the idea. Let's say we have two clocks. I leave one at home and keep one in my pocket. Then, ...
9
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6answers
17k views

Gravity on the International Space Station

We created a table in my physics class which contained the strength of gravity on different planet and objects in space. At altitude 0(earth), the gravitational strength is 100%. On the moon at ...
0
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2answers
64 views

Is the assumption that the two reference frames be inertial required in the derivation of transformation equations?

In the derivation of Galilean transformations the only assumption is that the two frames are moving with some uniform relative velocity $u$. Suppose with respect to some inertial frame $O$ the two ...
0
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1answer
23 views

How would an electron bunch/beam look different in the rest and lab frames?

With respect to special relativity, I was wondering how the spatial dimensions would differ between the rest and LAB frame of an electron beam. System: Electron bunch/beam traveling in linear motion. ...
1
vote
2answers
46 views

Centrifugal force when there is no friction [duplicate]

Assume that a coin is placed on circular disk and now a disk is rotated with constant angular velocity. If there is no friction between the surfaces of a disk and coin, according to theory the coin ...
2
votes
2answers
106 views

What will be the relative speed of a photon in a light ray to another photon of opposite direction light ray?

If two light rays start simultaneously in the space from exactly opposite ends in opposite direction that is separated by a distance of 600000 km in a way they meet at the mid point (300000 km from ...
4
votes
1answer
128 views

Pseudo Force Other Than Centrifugal Force In A Rotating Frame

I read in HC Verma that if we are observing the motion of a body from a rotating frame and the body under the observation is NOT in motion with respect to our frame than centrifugal force is the ...
2
votes
2answers
60 views

Is speed of light ( Sun-to-Earth ) related to the movement speed of solar system?

The speed of light has been measured to be 299 792 458 m/s. Now, the Solar System is traveling at an average speed of 828,000 km/h (230 000 m/s). Summing up the numbers we get close to 300 000 000 m/s ...
9
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3answers
1k views

What happens when relativistic effects stop?

I'm currently learning special relativity in high school and we only primarily deal with what happens when an object is moving at constant relativistic speeds. But what if the object slowed back down ...
6
votes
10answers
296 views

Why is centrifugal 'force' perpendicular to line of inertia

I know that centrifugal is labeled a fictitious force only arising in a rotating reference frame, but I still struggle to understand the forces at play intuitively in tethered rotating bodies. I've ...
0
votes
1answer
59 views

How does a black hole slow time? [duplicate]

I've been reading about black holes, and I keep coming across the fact that time runs slower near a them. My questions are: Does this mean that if you left Earth at age 30 and spent 30 years near the ...
13
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6answers
14k views

How exactly does time slow down near a black hole?

How exactly does time slow down near a black hole? I have heard this as a possible way of time traveling, and I do understand that it is due in some way to the massive gravity around a black hole, but ...
-1
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0answers
38 views

Is gravity just relative rotational velocity?

Einsteins law of relativity states that velocity is relative. so when object $A$ passes object $B$ at $v$ kph, object $B$ also passes object $A$ at $v$ kph. Maybe gravity is the universes way of ...
0
votes
1answer
113 views

What's the meaning of the age of the universe?

I'm not asking about how we worked backward from an expanding universe to the age of the big bang, but rather what is the meaning of time in a near infinitely dense point in the context of general ...
0
votes
1answer
66 views

In space I am moving wrt to what?

Let us suppose I am running on a street. When my eyes are open, I can see many things moving backward, and thus it gives me an idea that I am moving wrt those things. Not even this, even if I close my ...
4
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1answer
61 views

What happens if you let a cable roll slip into a black hole?

Does the cable roll spin faster the more cable goes into the black hole in reference of a observer standing next to it? Can gravity pull the cable that it exceed the speed of light inside a black ...
0
votes
1answer
30 views

Recession of galaxies

when you take such a given galaxy and it is said that you are moving away from us with a speed $v$, what do you mean really? Let me explain: is the galaxy itself which has an intrinsic velocity of ...
0
votes
1answer
66 views

Observers in Special Relativity

Suppose I am an observer in Minkowski space, observing a particle traveling with a constant velocity $v$. If I want to calculate the particle's Lorentz factor, given that the particle is traveling at ...
0
votes
1answer
48 views

Derivation of Foucault pendulum [closed]

Let us define our usual Cartesian coordinates ($x'$,$y'$,$z'$), and let the origin of our coordinate system correspond to the equilibrium position of the mass. If the pendulum cable is deflected from ...
21
votes
2answers
1k views

The age of the universe

Many times I have read statements like, "the age of the universe is 14 billion years" . For example this wikipedia page Big Bang. Now, my question is, which observers' are these time intervals? ...
12
votes
3answers
424 views

Do particles have different spins in different frames of reference?

Let's say we have two photons, whose momentum vectors point to opposite directions. Also spin angular momentum vectors of the photons point to opposite directions. (Sum of spins is zero) Now we ...
1
vote
3answers
145 views

Derivation of the general Lorentz transformation

The standard Lorentz transformation or boost with velocity $u$ is given by $$\left(\begin{matrix} ct \\ x \\ y \\ z \end{matrix}\right) = \left(\begin{matrix} \gamma & \gamma u/c & 0 & 0 ...
0
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3answers
86 views

Rotating reference frames

I'm trying to understand the equations that govern velocity in a rotating reference frame... \begin{equation} v_i = (\frac{dr}{dt})_r + \Omega \times r . \end{equation} I'd like to build a simple ...
3
votes
3answers
173 views

Conical vs Simple Pendulum

I don't understand why the Tension $T$ on a conical pendulum and a simple pendulum are different. In a simple pendulum, one would say that the tension of the rope is $T=mg \cos(\theta)$. However, ...
1
vote
1answer
81 views

Does the light speed change in media? [duplicate]

Does the light speed change? The Theory of Relativity says that the speed of light in vacuum is the same and unchangeable, while I read that the speed of light in glass is lower than in air, and that ...