A system of coordinates used as the basis for describing the position and motion of objects

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Lorentz invariance of the wave equation

I want to show that the 2-d wave equation is invariant under a boost, so, the starting point is the wave equation $$\frac{\partial^2\phi}{\partial x^2}=\frac{1}{c^2}\frac{\partial^2\phi}{\partial ...
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2answers
89 views

Einstein's Postulates: Simultaneity

Okay, I still don't get the solution (which I will lay out) to the following problem: Suppose that A', B', and C' are at rest in frame S', which moves with respect to S at speed v in the positive ...
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2answers
112 views

Angular Momentum of a rigid, extended object

Angular momentum of an object is a physical quantity that depends on the chosen point about which to calculate the angular momentum. It is often said that an object that has been thrown up in the air ...
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2answers
246 views

What would earth look like if traveling at 77% the speed of light?

I've been having a bit of trouble wrapping my mind around this. If I were in a ship going 77% the speed of light (enough to experience reasonable time dilation) would I see earth going in fast ...
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2answers
60 views

Velocity in a turning reference frame

I often see the relation that $\vec v=\vec v_0+ \vec \omega \times \vec r$ in a turning reference frame, but where does it actually come from and how do I arrive at the acceleration being $$\vec ...
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1answer
352 views

Difference between proper and comoving frames

I'm reading this book "Introduction to Quantum Fields in Classical Backgrounds" by Mukhanov & Winitzki, and there in the chapter 8 "The Unruh Effect" they introduce 3 reference frames. Laboratory ...
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1answer
260 views

Degrees of freedom in the infinite momentum frame

Lenny Susskind explains in this video at about 40min, as an extended object (for example a relativistic string) is boosted to the infinite momentum frame (sometimes called light cone frame), it has no ...
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1answer
523 views

Conservation of angular momentum across different reference frames?

I saw the following problem from the USAPhO: A uniform pool ball of radius $r$ begins at rest on a pool table. The ball is given a horizontal impulse $J$ of fixed magnitude at a distance $\beta r$ ...
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1answer
78 views

Space-Time Continuum [duplicate]

In special relativity it is said that " Time and space cannot be defined separately from one another. Rather space and time are interwoven into a single continuum known as spacetime. " What is the ...
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2answers
180 views

What does it mean to be stationary?

I'm looking for a simple answer. What do we regard a stationary. Do we mean an object that is not moving noticeable from the viewers perspective because then a parked car would be considered ...
2
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1answer
159 views

How do we know the Earth orbits around the Sun and not the other way around? [duplicate]

I know that describing the trajectory of all planets in the solar system around the Earth is much more complicated than if we take the Sun as the reference point. But besides this, what is the ...
2
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1answer
103 views

Speeds and frames of reference

When reports state that Voyager is traveling at ~17kmps or that a comet is traveling at 600kmps, what are these numbers relative to? Given that the Earth travels at ~30kmps and orbits the Sun which is ...
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1answer
1k views

If time stops at the speed of light is a photon 'everywhere' at once? [duplicate]

I am not a physicist so excuse my question if it's paticularly stupid. As a particle gets closer to the speed of light time slows down as for that particle as compared to a reference from the ...
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1answer
130 views

Explanation of a Foucault pendulum

The equations of motion of a Foucault pendulum is given by: $$\ddot{x} = 2\omega \sin\lambda \dot{y} - \frac{g}{L}x$$ $$\ddot{y} = -2\omega \sin\lambda \dot{x} - \frac{g}{L}y$$ where $\omega$ is ...
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2answers
199 views

Speed of Entropy change

If time in systems moving with different speed goes differently, does speed of entropy change differ in these systems? (is "speed of entropy change" a valid term? can we compare them?)
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1answer
603 views

Time dilation - why the observers see each other the slow one but then one of them is older or younger?

I'm in trouble with time dilation: Suppose that there's two people on the Earth (A,B), they are twins and each other has a clock. (So they are at the same reference frame). B travels in a spaceship ...
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59 views

About the speed of light

If Mr. E is aboard a spaceship traveling near the speed of light the usual reason for the spaceship not going faster than $c$ is the (relativistic) mass of the ship increases without bound, I think. ...
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2answers
106 views

What will be the relative speed of a photon in a light ray to another photon of opposite direction light ray?

If two light rays start simultaneously in the space from exactly opposite ends in opposite direction that is separated by a distance of 600000 km in a way they meet at the mid point (300000 km from ...
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0answers
87 views

Car parking special-relavity puzzle

Hi I read the following puzzle from an old text book long time ago. However it doesn't provide the answer. So what is the solution? Let's suppose a car is going to park to a garage and the garage is ...
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3answers
4k views

Why does an object with higher speed gain more (relativistic) mass? [duplicate]

Today, in my high school physics class, we had an introductory class on electromagnetism. My teacher explained at some point that an object with a very high speed (he said it started to get somewhat ...
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4answers
113 views

How should observers determine whether they can be described as being “defined on a Lorentzian manifold”?

Consider infinitely many distinguishable observers, no two of whom ever meet; and who generally "keep sight of each other", but not necessarily "each keeping sight of all others". How should they ...
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1answer
127 views

Does gravitational lensing violate Fermat's Principle that light must travel in straight lines?

Does bending of light due to warping of space violate Fermat's Principle or is it that in the principle light goes in a straight line with respect to space (taking space as the reference) and in ...
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4answers
265 views

What is the exact mechanism by which time dilates?

What is the exact mechanism by which time dilates for a fast moving object? Can the time dilation be explained by any theory other than relativity?
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3answers
199 views

Why if the torque equals zero measured from one point in space it equals zero measured from any other point?

I've heard it from two teachers and saw a task with a solution based on this assumption: If the net torque is zero when measured from one frame of reference, it is equal to zero in all other ...
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2answers
162 views

Do heavier objects fall faster? [duplicate]

This question has been asked multiple times here and all over the internet yet I can't find a conclusive answer: Some claim that heavier objects do fall faster: Don't heavier objects actually fall ...
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2answers
100 views

Whose reference frame to use for $d \theta$ near a black hole?

Using the Schwarzchild metric for a body circularly orbiting a nonspinning black hole (i.e. $dr=0$), the relation between $d\tau$, the time between two light pulses sent out infinitesimally close ...
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3answers
187 views

Why Sun light can reach us if Time is dilating?

I understand that if something is moving with constant speed in respect to an observer, the time of the moving one runs slower, so the more your speed is, the more your time ticks slower. Which ...
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7answers
1k views

If an event happens 10 light years away and we observe it here, did it actually happen 10 years ago?

I'm sorry if this question has been answered a squillion times, I need someone with smarts to explain it to me. If an event happens 10 light years away, and we observe it here, did it actually happen ...
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2answers
140 views

Will Earth clock be slower than aeroplane clock when viewed from another planet?

I know that a clock placed on an aeroplane will have slowed with respect to a clock placed on earth because the more our velocities are, compared to the speed of light, the more the time slows down. ...
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2answers
206 views

Intuitive understanding of centripetal vs. centrifugal force

I am having trouble understanding how centripetal force works intuitively. This is my claim. When I have a mass strapped on a string and spin it around, I feel the mass pulling my hand. So, I want ...
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2answers
145 views

Variance in speed of light

While discussing this question (Does light have an unending journey?) I stumbled on the fact that light's speed is constant only in inertial frame. What I happened to do was add up the expansion of ...
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2answers
209 views

“as measured in a local Lorentz frame”?

I've seen the phrase "as measured in a local Lorentz frame" tagged on the end of so many sentences. What does it mean precisely? To give an explanation with an example, consider the context of ...
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1answer
161 views

Proper times of two observers in a three-torus

Consider two observer in a tree-torus space of size $L$. Observer $A$ is at rest, while observer $B$ moves in the $x$-direction with constant velocity $v$. $A$ and $B$ began at the same event, and ...
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227 views

Watching something fall into a black hole from far away

I am observing (theoretically) an object falling into a black hole from a safe distance away. My understanding is that from far away it appears as if the body will asymptotically approach the event ...
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2answers
127 views

Frames of reference: Inertial and accelerated - and jerked, snapped, crackled and popped?

There are inertial frames of reference and the accelerated frames of reference, but are there any frames of references w.r.t. higher order derivatives of velocity? [1] [2] For example, jerked frames ...
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2answers
91 views

Gravity mitigated by velocity regardless of mass?

We know that a small object moving fast enough can pass by a planet and escape its gravity. Would this be (theoretically) true in reverse? Meaning a planet moving fast enough past a stationary smaller ...
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3answers
240 views

Special Relativity - speed of light question

Just a basic question: I know that if you are traveling at $x$ speed the time will pass for you slower than to an observer that is relatively stopped. That's all just because a photon released at the ...
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1answer
756 views

Does the increase of (relativistic) mass, while flying near speed of light, has any impact on astronauts? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Would travelling at relativistic speeds have any impact on human biology? I am asking myself this question for a few day. What is the answer on: Does the increase of ...
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1answer
222 views

Accelerating elevator?

If your in an elevator accelerating downwards faster than gravity, would you be pushed up to the ceiling? Since gravity cannot match the acceleration of the elevator, you're wouldn't be able to move ...
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1answer
81 views

Does the light speed change in media? [duplicate]

Does the light speed change? The Theory of Relativity says that the speed of light in vacuum is the same and unchangeable, while I read that the speed of light in glass is lower than in air, and that ...
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1answer
72 views

Because position is relative, is it possible to see a star orbiting a planet? [duplicate]

Position is relative, as it depends on the reference frame. We usually visualize the sun at the center of the solar system. BUT, we can also visualize the Earth at the center of the solar system, ...
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2answers
153 views

Centripetal force in frame of reference of body moving In a circle

Suppose a body is moving in a circle about a fixed point. In the frame of reference of the body, is the centripetal force felt or is only the centrifugal force felt? More generally, does a body only ...
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3answers
122 views

Do you age at different rate at different speed?

This is probably answered many times, but my confusion is the following. In special relativity it is said that there is no preferred coordinate system. Does that mean that for the people at rest ...
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1answer
67 views

kinetic energy of the stone

Suppose we have a man traveling in an open car (roof open) with speed $v$ towards right (man faces right). He throws a stone (mass $m$) towards right, in his frame-forward with speed $V$. In the ...
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2answers
168 views

Internal/Rotational angular momentum

I have some difficulties to understand the relation between the internal and the rotational angular momentum of a rigid body which is also known as K├Ânig's theorem, so what physical intuition lies ...
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1answer
737 views

Calculating velocities using Reference frames

Suppose an object A is traveling at a velocity of 100 m/s, and another object B is traveling at 105 m/s. With both the objects traveling through the same direction, taking A as a reference frame, the ...
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1answer
62 views

Regarding the centrifugal force in a 3-body system

In our lecture about general mechanics, we have treated the simplified 3-body system consisting of the Sun, the Earth and the Moon. We assumed that the moon does not have any influence on the Sun or ...
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2answers
124 views

What does it mean to divide space and time?

Goldstein's mechanics book, on the chapter on relativistic mechanics says that "We cannot assume that all observers make the same division into time and space in the same way." What does it mean to ...
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3answers
108 views

A reference frame must be non-moving?

I'm tough in school that a reference frame must be non-moving; For example if I take as reference frame the waves of the ocean, i will have the impression that i'm moving, but I'm not. But if movement ...
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1answer
102 views

Why is body frame angular velocity nonzero?

This question is relevant to Euler's angles and Euler's equations for a rigid body. Why aren't $\omega_1$, $\omega_2$ and $\omega_3 = 0$ in the body frame? How can we measure $\vec\omega$?