Radiation is a process in which energetic particles or energetic waves travel through a medium or space. The particles or waves radiate (i.e., travel outward in all directions) from a source.

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soplar radiation conversion check

I'm analysing some solar radiation data, which is the calculated as the daily sum of PAR in MJ m-2 d-1. Assuming that PAR makes 42% from total irradiance, how can I convert this to solar radiation ...
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Why is the intensity of an alpha ray constant along a material?

I'm taking a course in radiation physics and I've come across the following problem: A thin beam of alpha particles of intensity $I_0$ and energy $E_0$ impacts in a material. What is the intensity ...
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Can electrons within a positive ion absorb and reflect light?

I understand that in a crystalline metallic structure, such as one making up a bar of gold, there are one, or more, valance electrons of each atom that have left their outer shell (became free ...
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Detecting radiation from tritium keychain

I am measuring radiation from 6 tritium glow keychains. Usual gamma detector does not detect anything (this is expected), but on beta detector with thin window I am getting about 5 counts per second. ...
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Finding electric power generated using heat transfer

I'm working through an example I have been given to study. Suppose I have a 2m X 4m photovoltaic panel on my roof that is irradiated with a solar flux of $G_s = 700W/m^2$. Given: $\alpha_s = 0.83$ ...
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How many photons are there in free space on average

Estimates of the amount of for example "dark matter" are of interest to the cosmologists. However, I have never seen an estimate of how many "free" photons could be speeding about in the known ...
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Fermi's theory of beta decay - Does Fermi's Hamiltonian have the wrong transformation properties?

I'm studying the theory of beta decays as proposed by Fermi in the 30's, and I found an inconsistency between the transformation properties that he claims for his Hamiltonian and the transformation ...
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How do electrons jump orbitals?

My question isn't how they receive the energy to jump, but why. When someone views an element's emission spectrum, we see a line spectrum which proves that they don't exist outside of their orbitals ...
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How can heat turn into light

I am confused about how hot surfaces can radiate light to their surroundings. When I shine a light on a surface the light turns to heat spontaneously, and when I leave that hot surface it radiates ...
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55 views

Cesium-137 From Fukushima Meltdown

I've been reading up on the Fukushima nuclear meltdown and its effects it had on the environment. The iodine-131 initially released from the incident decayed after 8 days, but other isotopes such as ...
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Are the leptons in $\beta^-$ decay already present in the nucleus in some form?

In beta minus decay, beta-minus particle and anti-neutrino are ejected, leaving behind daughter nucleus. $\beta^-$ and anti-neutrino both are leptons. Were the leptons already present in the ...
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5k views

How to calculate incident solar energy on earth in a given day with a spectral filter

The daily solar radiation irradiation is often quoted as being between $3.2 \text{ kW hours}/\text{m}^2$ and $7 \text{kW hours}/\text{m}^2$ per day . If you filter out a range of wavelengths, how can ...
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How can we detect cosmic background radiation?

From what I understand, CMB is the left over radiation from the Big Bang. As all matter, including the Earth, was made during the Big Bang and then as the universe expanded that matter/energy got ...
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34 views

Long distance radiation detection, David Hahn and the clock

The strange character David Hahn, obsessed with creating a nuclear reactor since a young age, was reportedly wandering around his neighborhood with a Geiger counter and by this means he located a ...
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40 views

Have cosmic rays and the CMB affected Earth's history?

Do cosmic rays and the cosmic microwave background carry with them enough energy to have a macroscopic effect on events on Earth? The most obvious example I can think of is by giving animals cancer. ...
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Does an atom become positively charged as a result of Beta decay? [duplicate]

Since a neutron breaks down into an electron and a proton, and the electron is emitted as beta particles, the atom has an extra proton (protons>electrons). So, the atom becomes positively charged. But ...
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48 views

Can neutrinos cause $^{14}\rm C\to\,^{14} N$ beta-decay?

I half-heard in a lecture that radiocarbon beta-decay is caused by neutrinos passing close to the nuclei & weakly interacting with one of the carbon neutrons, flipping it to a proton and producing ...
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Why do microwave ovens use radiation with such long wavelength?

According to Wikipedia: Consumer ovens usually use 2.45 gigahertz (GHz)—a wavelength of 12.2 centimetres (4.80 in). Typically, I put the dish inside the oven in its center. I suspect most ...
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Does a conducting wire give off measurable radiation?

In the Drude model (semi-classical, but should still apply here I think), the conducting electrons are in a constant electric field, and, in between collisions with the lattice ions (that happen, on ...
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154 views

Gamma Spectrum: What is causing this behavior?

In my radiation detection lab we're identifying a unknown source, based on the gamma spectrum it's an activated gold foil. You can clearly see 4 peaks: 411.78 keV (Au-198), 675.93 keV (Au-198), 823.51 ...
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How deep would a moonbase have to be dug for radiation protection?

The atmosphere of the earth protects us from cosmic rays and other kinds of space radiation. On the moon there is little to no atmosphere so anyone on the surface of the moon is directly exposed to ...
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26 views

Can we have Bremsstrahlung emission of particles which are heavier than the initial radiating particle?

Lets consider a light particle in a high-energy process. Can this light particle radiate "Bremsstrahlung particles" which are heavier than the initial light particle? In this context I don't refer ...
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Electron energy from beta decay

I read in my IB-physics book that the average energy for an electron in the beta decay of Potassium-40 is 0.44 MeV. However this would imply the electron have a velocity of 3.9E8 m/s, i.e. faster than ...
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21 views

What is the meaning of the magnitudes on the axes of this spectrum?

I'm taking a course on radiation physics and I've been given an spectrum by my professor (concretely it is a spectrum of $\left.^{22} Na \right.$). This is the first time that I come across this kind ...
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649 views

The problem of self-force on point charges

Allow me to preface this by stating that I am a high school student interested in physics and self-studying using a variety of resources, both on- and off-line, primarily GSU's HyperPhysics website, ...
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Other methods of X-ray production

Long running debate, I would like to find a definitive answer. In a long glass tube (borosilicate or other common glass) with high frequency AC excitation at one end, 50-60kV, with high evacuation, I ...
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Where is radiation density in the Planck 2013 results?

I've been looking at the Planck 2013 cosmological parameters paper, trying to update my toy cosmology simulator with the most recent data. Most of the interesting values such as $H_0$, $\Omega_m$, ...
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Could the $\gamma$ ray “weaken law” be used in the air?

I'd better write it down. I do not know if it is called "weaken law" in English. $$N=N_0e^{-\mu d}$$ $N$ is the initial number of photons. $N_0$ is the amount measured after passing through an ...
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Direction of the radiation reaction force (vs. velocity)

The radiation reaction force is proportional to $\dot{\mathbf{a}}$, and can be derived from the the Larmor power using the concept of the conservation of energy. Looks like the radiation reaction ...
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How does heat energy travel in space?

How does the heat energy from the Sun reach us on the Earth? Since the kinetic energy of an atom is the amount of heat energy and there is no matter in space, how does heat from the Sun reach us?
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Question about Cavendish experiment

I got a question. In Cavendish experiment was used lead in both of spheres. Can we repeat that experiment with balls made from stone or anything else. Because lead could be a byproduct of radioactive ...
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What common materials absorb most infrared light?

I'm competing in a simple robotics competition where most of the participants use reflected infrared light to detect their opponent. I'd like to make my own robot as difficult to see as possible. What ...
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29 views

Meaning of mean free path expressed as kg/m^2?

In the paper "The Question of Pure Fusion Explosions under the CTBT" at reference 12, the equation for the neutron dose from the fusion of a small amount of DT gas is given, with a term of $90 ...
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Would being underwater help survive a nuclear bomb?

If I jump in my pool, on the river near my house knowing that a nuclear bomb, or atomic or H-Bomb exploded around 10 km from my house, would I survive? The way I see it is that water will protect me ...
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What common materials can effectively block infrared radiation?

I have a plastic container and want to make sure that infrared radiation (specifically, in the 750-850 nanometer range) cannot pass through it. Would wrapping it in aluminum foil do the trick? If not, ...
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Radiation weighting factor photons

I'm wondering about the equivalent dose and the radiation weighting factor of photons (according to ICRP 103). Why is the weighting factor independent from the energy of the photons?
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Hot Object In a Cooler Space [closed]

How would you calculate the heat given by an object that is hotter than its surroundings? I know there's Newton's Cooling Law, but what about any heat given off by radiation? Are these additive ...
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Do all thermal radiators have the same surface brightness?

Imagine I heat a piece of metal to 1000K. It will be red hot and will emit black body radiation corresponding to this temperature. But what about the brightness? Assuming the bulk is opaque, does it ...
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The role of W bosons in the weak nuclear force and beta decay

I am a beginner Physics student and I am studying the weak nuclear force and how particle interactions work. Now, from my book and the Feynman diagram, I learned that a neutron can change into a ...
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Radiation by an accelerated charge

An elastically bound electron vibrates in simple harmonic motion at frequency $\omega$ with amplitude $A\;.$ Find the average rate of loss of energy by radiation. So I think I can use ...
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How do molecules absorb heat?

How do molecules absorb and retain heat, and how is that heat able to still affect nearby molecules? On Venus there is a green-house effect where the large, dense Carbon-Dioxide atmosphere absorbs ...
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How can I estimate the number of X-Ray photons generated from a x ray tube?

I have this problem. I have an x ray tube of which I know the specific (kV, mA, anode material) and I have to estimate the number of X ray photons hitting the sensor after passing through air and ...
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How can there be heat in a vacuum?

I keep reading in the Physics World focus issue on vacuum technology about scientists creating high temperatures in the vacuums etc. If heat is caused by thermal energy being radiated from particles ...
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Understanding Vaidya metric and pure radiation stress-energy tensor

I am following Vaidya metric and how it is related to pure radiation from Wikipedia. But when it reaches the line where stress-energy tensor is equated to product of two four-vectors, I cannot follow ...
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Effect of radiation pressure on Earths orbit in large timescales

I have seen some posts concerning the radiation pressure exerted by the Sun on Earths surface (Force on Earth due to Sun's radiation pressure). Though it is fairly small may it have a considerable ...
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How does a gas emit radiation with temperature when it's particles motion are linear?

Particles in gas move faster with temperature in a linear motion (root mean velocity equation?) right? It explains increase in pressure and effusion proportional to temperature. Solids emit radiation ...
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What is the difference between beta positive decay and proton decay?

Though beta positive decay's have been observed, in which a proton decays into a neutron, positron and an electron- neutrino; the why is it not the same as the exotic proton decay which is ...
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Relativistic explanation of Radiation

I ask this question again in a simpler, shorter form. Maxwell's equations can be derived with Special relativity starting from the Coulomb's law. Therefore all the phenomena of classical ...
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How does mass affect the range of a nuclear particle?

Heavy particles such as protons and alpha particles of certain energy will lose all their energies in a definite distance in a medium, and this distance is called the range. The range is the distance ...
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What is happening over the 15 minutes it takes a neutron to decay?

I've read that free neutrons decay into a proton, electron and neutrino with an average lifespan of about 15 minutes. Is there anything physically different about a neutron that has existed for 14 ...