Radiation is a process in which energetic particles or energetic waves travel through a medium or space. The particles or waves radiate (i.e., travel outward in all directions) from a source.

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Would a laser with four possible energy levels be better than three?

I'm wondering about achieving population inversion for a laser. I learned that without an active medium, it's not possible to create a laser with only two energy levels, but it would be possible with ...
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Quantum yield and spontaneous decay

I'm trying to figure out how many atoms are decaying spontaneously in a span of 2 seconds. Let's say that the quantum yield is 0.45, and that the lifetime "τ" (tau) is 10 microseconds. Then I found ...
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Question on Radiance equation

The radiance equation is $$ L = \frac{d}{dA} \frac{2(\phi)}{dW cos(\theta)} (watt/srm^2) $$ where $\phi$ is the flux. I am thinking, should not be the cosine term on the numerator instead of the ...
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Specific electron energy gap values $E_{i+1}-E_i$ vs. photons with arbitrary energy $\hbar \omega$

The energy levels of electrons in an atom are quantized $E_i$. A photon of a specific momentum $\vec p$ and energy $$\omega=(E_{i+1}-E_i)/\hbar$$ hits an atom and gets absorbed. Okay now say the ...
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A hot object exposed to low temperature in a vacuum doesn't lose heat?

I heard somewhere that if the human body were exposed to outer space where the temperature is extremely low, the human won't actually feel cold because in a vacuum, the heat energy doesn't have ...
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Is it possible to speed up radioactive decay rates? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Do some half-lives change over time? Would it be possible to considerably speed up the decay rate of an isotope? Considerably meaning more then a 1 or 2% increase in ...
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Surface UV exposure with cooler star

If the sun's surface was ~ 4000K (and earth closer to compensate), the UV component of the radiation would be less. However, UV makes ozone via photolysis of oxygen. Also, the stratosphere would ...
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1answer
530 views

What is the relation between surface area and radiation, if any?

Basically I wonder what happens to emitted radiation by douubling a light e.g. twice the surface area of the sun will emit how much more radiation? 4 times more? Is there a formula?
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65 views

Does it happen at high energies (heavier leptons decay)?

A lepton is an elementary particle. The best known of all leptons is the electron which governs nearly all of chemistry as it is found in atoms and is directly tied to all chemical properties. The ...
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51 views

Non reflecting boundaries in waveguides

Can someone please explain the Sommerfeld radiation condition and what is the alternative non-reflecting boundary conditions for waveguides of general geometries?
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How do electrons jump orbitals?

My question isn't how they receive the energy to jump, but why. When someone views an element's emission spectrum, we see a line spectrum which proves that they don't exist outside of their orbitals ...
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617 views

How to interpret Stefan-Boltzmann's law?

The Stefan-Boltzmann equation states $e=\sigma T^4$, but how do we interpret this? Is this completely wrong: A body of size $s^2$ generates the radiation/temperature $T^4$ for a given size and a ...
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Can you speed up radioactive decay of plutonium?

We all know the issue of deep geological repositories for fuel rods. Is there a currently feasible way to speed up the rod's decay to render them harmless in less than 10 years?
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Effect of Background Radiation on a Transmitted Signal

I'm coding a basic simulation of using error correcting codes to transmit data from a satellite back to earth. I'm not sure what to set the "noise level" to. Let's say a satellite orbiting Mars ...
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35 views

Half-Life Question [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: How do we know that some radioactive materials have a half life of millions or even billions of years? I understand how to calculate decay, but it seems to me that the ...
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2answers
387 views

How to detect radiation on the metal (coin)?

I've got metal coin : http://www.worldpeacecoin.org/ Ruble/dollar, a coin of disarmament with certificate. But, I am very spleeny person, I fear of it's radiance level and I don't know if I can trust ...
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244 views

The Deflecting System in a Hot Cathode Ray Tube

In an HCR-Tube, the deflecting system used to deviate the electron beam is made of positively charged plates. How is this justified? If, due to some malfunction, the electron beam deflects from its ...
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1answer
73 views

Range of electromagnetic waves

I was reading this article. There is a statement "It is a well-known fact that the telecom towers mounted with antennas in the lower frequency bands can cover far greater areas than those using the ...
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1answer
10k views

What common materials can effectively block infrared radiation?

I have a plastic container and want to make sure that infrared radiation (specifically, in the 750-850 nanometer range) cannot pass through it. Would wrapping it in aluminum foil do the trick? If not, ...
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220 views

How to choose a $\alpha$, $\beta$, $\gamma$ measurement detector?

There are many different detectors for different radiation,such as NaI,HpGe,CsI for $\gamma$ detection,and ionization chamber,proportional counter,Geiger counter for $\alpha$, $\beta$ detection,but ...
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256 views

Does the strong (nuclear) force ever contribute to decay?

Does the strong (nuclear) force ever contribute to decay ? Or is the weak nuclear force the only decaying force ?
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294 views

Is it true that an isolated fundamental particle does not decay?

Is it true that an isolated fundamental/elementary particle does not decay? It seems logical to me.
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492 views

How to detect Iodine 131?

$I_{131}\rightarrow \beta \text{ 333.8 KeV(7.27%)}\rightarrow \gamma\text{ 636.989 KeV(7.17%)}$ $I_{131}\rightarrow\beta\text{ 606.3KeV(89.9%)}\rightarrow\gamma\text{ 364.489KeV(81.7%)}$ (you can ...
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1answer
595 views

How is tritium illumination possible without negative health effects?

Turns out there's tritium illumination - a tiny very strong plastic tube will be covered in phosphor and filled with tritium. Tritium will undergo beta decay and a flow of electrons will cause the ...
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1answer
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Alpha-stable isotopes

Why some isotopes with positive alpha-decay energy are stable? For example, alpha-decay energy of stable 194Pt is about 1.5 MeV. But there is no stable isotopes with positive beta-decay energy. ...
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71 views

What sort of thin film experiments can be done in zero gravity and in the presence of cosmic radiation?

I recently found out about sending stuff into space and using the unique zero gravity and cosmic radiation riddled environment to investigate stuff like crystal growth. Since thin film science is a ...
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620 views

Antimatter bomb

I stumbled upon this wikipedia article on antimatter weaponry. Being greatly appalled by the sad fact that large sums of money are being wasted on this, I could not stop myself from thinking for a ...
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4answers
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Why is Neutron Heavier than Proton? [closed]

This is Neutron decay: $$n^o \to p^+ + e^- + \overline {\nu_e}.$$ and this is proton one: $$p^+ \to n^o + e^+ + \nu_e$$ so when the $e^+ =e^-$ and $\nu_e=\overline {\nu_e}$ why $n \not= p$? my ...
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How can there be heat in a vacuum?

I keep reading in the Physics World focus issue on vacuum technology about scientists creating high temperatures in the vacuums etc. If heat is caused by thermal energy being radiated from particles ...
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498 views

Where does the “borrowed energy” come from in Alpha decay?

I was also thinking about the uncertainty principle in regards with energy & time. The question of something like: Alpha tunneling out of the nucleus is where this can be invoked, but having an ...
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1answer
76 views

At what rate does radiation exposure occur at high-c speeds?

If a future astronaut travelled to Alpha Centauri at a significant percentage of light-speed? Apart from increased blue shifted radiation from their direction of travel - how would they experience ...
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3answers
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What is happening over the 15 minutes it takes a neutron to decay?

I've read that free neutrons decay into a proton, electron and neutrino with an average lifespan of about 15 minutes. Is there anything physically different about a neutron that has existed for 14 ...
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1answer
64 views

References for nuclear masses, mass deficits, decay rates and modes

Where can I find the base data for computing the energy release of nuclear decays and the spectra of the decay products? My immediate need is to find the energy release by the beta decay of Thorium ...
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595 views

How is a cathode ray tube different from beta minus radiation?

In beta minus the result is one neutron in the nucleus changing to a proton, plus an electron and an anti-neutrino being sent off. The antineutrino is indifferent to our health. So I guess what ...
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686 views

What isotope has the shortest half life?

Question: What isotope has the shortest half life?
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246 views

How do I calculate the Radiation length of a Molecule

I want to calculate the Radiation length in a Molecule with the Formula given on wikipedia. How do I calculate Z and A for a molecule to put it into the Formula?
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A problem concerning the change of temperature and spectrum of a filament

The spectrum of a filament has been given before, the left one having the lowest temperature, the middle with a medium temperature and the right one with the highest. My question is this: Why does ...
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2answers
177 views

Can a free hydrogen atom constitute ionizing radiation?

Radiation is basically just particles flying around, right? Are free hydrogen atoms just typically not moving fast enough to be considered "radiation"?
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Are scalars starting at around 1300 MeV analogous to some kind of sound in the vacuum glue?

Are scalars starting at around 1300 MeV analogous to some kind of sound in the vacuum glue? Background: There are scalars starting at around 1300 MeV which are probably some combination of ...
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Neutron decay and electron anti neutrino $n\to p + e + \bar{\nu}_e$

Why do we need neutrino to explain neutron decay? Is there any evidence regarding existence neutrinos in the context of $n\to p + e + \bar{\nu}_e$?
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$\Omega_{r}$ from WMAP results?

To do some Friedmann-Lemaître cosmology calculations, I would like to know an estimation of $\Omega_{r_0}$ ($\Omega$ radiation today). WMAP 7 give estimation of $\Omega_{b}$, $\Omega_{c}$ and ...
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Radiative transfer equation solution

The solution of the radiative transfer equation for spherical ionized blob : \begin{equation} \frac{dI_{\nu}}{ds} = j_{\nu}-\alpha I_{\nu} \end{equation} and solution is (Ref: ...
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How do gravitational waves sustain and propagate large scale spacetime curvature?

I understand that gravity in GR is a manifestation spacetime curvature dictated by the field equations by the principle that objects follow the geodesic path in spacetime. And, I get how ...
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Is there a direct relationship between an isotope's neutron count and radioactivity?

In my textbook, it lists isotopes of Carbon: C-12, C-13, and C-14. It noted that C-14 is radioactive (C-12 and C-13 are not). Is there a direct relationship between the number of neutrons and an ...
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Possibility for radiation in dark matter that is not interactive with regular matter?

Definition: Radiation in this case does not refer to electromagnetic radiation. It refers to any kind of emission of energy, even energy that does not interact with regular matter. Just like dark ...
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Transient radiation--heating a slab

Hey guys I really need help on this problem. A ceramic slab of dimentions 5cm x 10 cm x .25 cm has to be heated to $177\,^{\circ}{\rm C}$. The ceramic slab travels on a conveyor belt traveling at ...
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Why are alpha particles made of 2 protons and neutrons?

When experiencing alpha decay, atoms shed alpha particles made of 2 protons and 2 neutrons. Why can't we have other types of particles made of more or less protons?
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How to calculate gamma radiation shielding?

A device emits 0.2 μSv/h of gamma rays. How thick does an aluminum sheet need to be to completely stop radiation from coming out ? What equation is to be used to calculate this ?
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Has Bose-Einstein theory been considered for dark matter?

Has Bose-Einstein theory been considered for dark matter? The theory would explain why no measurable radiation is emitted due to zero temperature--its lack of interaction with other matter and its ...
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What exactly is the difference between radiation and convection?

Okay, so everywhere I've read, I hear the main difference is the requirement of a medium. But for example, if you take the case of heat 'radiating' from a red-hot iron, isn't that actually convection ...