Radiation is a process in which energetic particles or energetic waves travel through a medium or space. The particles or waves radiate (i.e., travel outward in all directions) from a source.

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Is it possible to record the 'blue air" effect when a core goes critical?

I've been studying about radiation, and I saw something called the Demon Core. Apparently, it was a core that was under experimentation by the government in Los Alamos to see the exact point at which ...
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83 views

Nuclear transition notation

I have a question which asks me to determine what x is for the following nuclear transition $$^{29}Si(\alpha, n)X$$ But I don't have any idea what this notation implies. Another example: ...
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What was the first ionization radiation?

While trying to make somewhat of a timeline of the history of ionizatig radiation, i am wondering about the following questions: The first photoelectrical effect was found 1839 by Alexandre ...
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118 views

The equal opposite reaction of radiation pressure

If the photons of a laser would produce a radiation pressure upon whatever it shown upon wouldn't it be accurate to say that the laser would be propelled in the opposite direction of its beam?
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Can two spaceships go fast enough to pass straight through each other?

Probability of interaction between two particles tends to wane with increasing energy. Technically, the cross section of most interactions falls off with increasing velocity. $$\sigma(v) \propto ...
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141 views

Beta decay for Ar-38, K-38, Cl-38

I want to prove that $^{38}Ar$ is stable with respect to $\beta$ decay, that $^{38}Cl$ decays by $\beta^-$ and that $^{38}K$ decays by $\beta^+$. I know from Googling that this is true, and I also ...
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75 views

$\alpha$ decay to more than one nuclear state

I do not understand how $\alpha$ decay can be a probabilistic process such that there are multiple products from the decay. For example: $^{241}\mathrm{Cm}$ decays to the excited states of ...
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151 views

Alpha-stable isotopes

Why some isotopes with positive alpha-decay energy are stable? For example, alpha-decay energy of stable 194Pt is about 1.5 MeV. But there is no stable isotopes with positive beta-decay energy. ...
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155 views

Radiation exposure to a child who was briefly in the presence of an adult who had received a 18FDG PET scan

I am a physician who thought she was good at math, but apparently am not as I cannot figure out this mathematical/physics question. (My background is obviously NOT nuclear medicine!) A family friend ...
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Would a laser with four possible energy levels be better than three?

I'm wondering about achieving population inversion for a laser. I learned that without an active medium, it's not possible to create a laser with only two energy levels, but it would be possible with ...
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106 views

Quantum yield and spontaneous decay

I'm trying to figure out how many atoms are decaying spontaneously in a span of 2 seconds. Let's say that the quantum yield is 0.45, and that the lifetime "τ" (tau) is 10 microseconds. Then I found ...
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Decay of massless particles

We don't normally consider the possibility that massless particles could undergo radioactive decay. There are elementary arguments that make it sound implausible. (A bunch of the following is ...
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342 views

Do and can phone signals come inside AC car which is glass-packed

Can phone signals penetrate glass, so can I expect phone signals to come if I am sitting inside a closed AC car. Thanks,
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273 views

Specific electron energy gap values $E_{i+1}-E_i$ vs. photons with arbitrary energy $\hbar \omega$

The energy levels of electrons in an atom are quantized $E_i$. A photon of a specific momentum $\vec p$ and energy $$\omega=(E_{i+1}-E_i)/\hbar$$ hits an atom and gets absorbed. Okay now say the ...
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2k views

Is it possible to speed up radioactive decay rates? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Do some half-lives change over time? Would it be possible to considerably speed up the decay rate of an isotope? Considerably meaning more then a 1 or 2% increase in ...
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1answer
347 views

What is the relation between surface area and radiation, if any?

Basically I wonder what happens to emitted radiation by douubling a light e.g. twice the surface area of the sun will emit how much more radiation? 4 times more? Is there a formula?
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279 views

Is there a direct relationship between an isotope's neutron count and radioactivity?

In my textbook, it lists isotopes of Carbon: C-12, C-13, and C-14. It noted that C-14 is radioactive (C-12 and C-13 are not). Is there a direct relationship between the number of neutrons and an ...
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What exactly is the difference between radiation and convection?

Okay, so everywhere I've read, I hear the main difference is the requirement of a medium. But for example, if you take the case of heat 'radiating' from a red-hot iron, isn't that actually convection ...
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Surface UV exposure with cooler star

If the sun's surface was ~ 4000K (and earth closer to compensate), the UV component of the radiation would be less. However, UV makes ozone via photolysis of oxygen. Also, the stratosphere would ...
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Are dangerous rays emitted during Solar Eclipse?

It is said one should avoid staring at Sun as it can damage the eyes, but it is also said that one should not come out in sun during eclipse as it emits dangerous rays. Is that true? If yes, why?
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Has Bose-Einstein theory been considered for dark matter?

Has Bose-Einstein theory been considered for dark matter? The theory would explain why no measurable radiation is emitted due to zero temperature--its lack of interaction with other matter and its ...
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How do electrons jump orbitals?

My question isn't how they receive the energy to jump, but why. When someone views an element's emission spectrum, we see a line spectrum which proves that they don't exist outside of their orbitals ...
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1answer
63 views

Does it happen at high energies (heavier leptons decay)?

A lepton is an elementary particle. The best known of all leptons is the electron which governs nearly all of chemistry as it is found in atoms and is directly tied to all chemical properties. The ...
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48 views

Non reflecting boundaries in waveguides

Can someone please explain the Sommerfeld radiation condition and what is the alternative non-reflecting boundary conditions for waveguides of general geometries?
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530 views

How to interpret Stefan-Boltzmann's law?

The Stefan-Boltzmann equation states $e=\sigma T^4$, but how do we interpret this? Is this completely wrong: A body of size $s^2$ generates the radiation/temperature $T^4$ for a given size and a ...
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Effect of Background Radiation on a Transmitted Signal

I'm coding a basic simulation of using error correcting codes to transmit data from a satellite back to earth. I'm not sure what to set the "noise level" to. Let's say a satellite orbiting Mars ...
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30 views

Half-Life Question [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: How do we know that some radioactive materials have a half life of millions or even billions of years? I understand how to calculate decay, but it seems to me that the ...
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4answers
525 views

Interpretation of Wigner function in optics

I work in the field of synchrotron radiation sources where radiation (often x-rays) is produced from an electron beam going through magnetic fields. The quality of the resulting x-ray beam is ...
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297 views

How to detect radiation on the metal (coin)?

I've got metal coin : http://www.worldpeacecoin.org/ Ruble/dollar, a coin of disarmament with certificate. But, I am very spleeny person, I fear of it's radiance level and I don't know if I can trust ...
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1answer
71 views

Range of electromagnetic waves

I was reading this article. There is a statement "It is a well-known fact that the telecom towers mounted with antennas in the lower frequency bands can cover far greater areas than those using the ...
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399 views

Where does the “borrowed energy” come from in Alpha decay?

I was also thinking about the uncertainty principle in regards with energy & time. The question of something like: Alpha tunneling out of the nucleus is where this can be invoked, but having an ...
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232 views

Is it true that an isolated fundamental particle does not decay?

Is it true that an isolated fundamental/elementary particle does not decay? It seems logical to me.
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219 views

Possibility for radiation in dark matter that is not interactive with regular matter?

Definition: Radiation in this case does not refer to electromagnetic radiation. It refers to any kind of emission of energy, even energy that does not interact with regular matter. Just like dark ...
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1answer
520 views

How is tritium illumination possible without negative health effects?

Turns out there's tritium illumination - a tiny very strong plastic tube will be covered in phosphor and filled with tritium. Tritium will undergo beta decay and a flow of electrons will cause the ...
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1answer
60 views

References for nuclear masses, mass deficits, decay rates and modes

Where can I find the base data for computing the energy release of nuclear decays and the spectra of the decay products? My immediate need is to find the energy release by the beta decay of Thorium ...
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What sort of thin film experiments can be done in zero gravity and in the presence of cosmic radiation?

I recently found out about sending stuff into space and using the unique zero gravity and cosmic radiation riddled environment to investigate stuff like crystal growth. Since thin film science is a ...
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858 views

Why do electron-positron pair annihilate upon contact?

I'll a appreciate a layman's explanation, if there exists one, to this question that arose when reading an popular-science level article on Einstein and the $E=MC^2$ equation. What I mean is that, ...
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2answers
511 views

Antimatter bomb

I stumbled upon this wikipedia article on antimatter weaponry. Being greatly appalled by the sad fact that large sums of money are being wasted on this, I could not stop myself from thinking for a ...
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1answer
74 views

At what rate does radiation exposure occur at high-c speeds?

If a future astronaut travelled to Alpha Centauri at a significant percentage of light-speed? Apart from increased blue shifted radiation from their direction of travel - how would they experience ...
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683 views

What is happening over the 15 minutes it takes a neutron to decay?

I've read that free neutrons decay into a proton, electron and neutrino with an average lifespan of about 15 minutes. Is there anything physically different about a neutron that has existed for 14 ...
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642 views

Transient radiation--heating a slab

Hey guys I really need help on this problem. A ceramic slab of dimentions 5cm x 10 cm x .25 cm has to be heated to $177\,^{\circ}{\rm C}$. The ceramic slab travels on a conveyor belt traveling at ...
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468 views

How is a cathode ray tube different from beta minus radiation?

In beta minus the result is one neutron in the nucleus changing to a proton, plus an electron and an anti-neutrino being sent off. The antineutrino is indifferent to our health. So I guess what ...
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537 views

What isotope has the shortest half life?

Question: What isotope has the shortest half life?
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211 views

How do I calculate the Radiation length of a Molecule

I want to calculate the Radiation length in a Molecule with the Formula given on wikipedia. How do I calculate Z and A for a molecule to put it into the Formula?
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Are scalars starting at around 1300 MeV analogous to some kind of sound in the vacuum glue?

Are scalars starting at around 1300 MeV analogous to some kind of sound in the vacuum glue? Background: There are scalars starting at around 1300 MeV which are probably some combination of ...
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307 views

Neutron decay and electron anti neutrino $n\to p + e + \bar{\nu}_e$

Why do we need neutrino to explain neutron decay? Is there any evidence regarding existence neutrinos in the context of $n\to p + e + \bar{\nu}_e$?
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$\Omega_{r}$ from WMAP results?

To do some Friedmann-Lemaître cosmology calculations, I would like to know an estimation of $\Omega_{r_0}$ ($\Omega$ radiation today). WMAP 7 give estimation of $\Omega_{b}$, $\Omega_{c}$ and ...
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1answer
149 views

How do gravitational waves sustain and propagate large scale spacetime curvature?

I understand that gravity in GR is a manifestation spacetime curvature dictated by the field equations by the principle that objects follow the geodesic path in spacetime. And, I get how ...
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486 views

Cosmic ray hazards

The Pierre Auger Observatory site mentions the detection of a 3E20 eV (48 J) cosmic ray whose energy, well above the GZK cutoff, was based on an analysis of its atmospheric shower. This was equivalent ...
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Why are alpha particles made of 2 protons and neutrons?

When experiencing alpha decay, atoms shed alpha particles made of 2 protons and 2 neutrons. Why can't we have other types of particles made of more or less protons?