Radiation is a process in which energetic particles or energetic waves travel through a medium or space. The particles or waves radiate (i.e., travel outward in all directions) from a source.

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Alpha-stable isotopes

Why some isotopes with positive alpha-decay energy are stable? For example, alpha-decay energy of stable 194Pt is about 1.5 MeV. But there is no stable isotopes with positive beta-decay energy. ...
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389 views

Has Bose-Einstein theory been considered for dark matter?

Has Bose-Einstein theory been considered for dark matter? The theory would explain why no measurable radiation is emitted due to zero temperature--its lack of interaction with other matter and its ...
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Solar Cycle UV Variation

The average energy we receive from the Sun is 1,366 w/m^2, and this only varies by 0.1% from the activity peak to trough of its 11 year cycle. About 9% of the energy comes from wavelengths less than ...
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Gamma Spectrum: What is causing this behavior?

In my radiation detection lab we're identifying a unknown source, based on the gamma spectrum it's an activated gold foil. You can clearly see 4 peaks: 411.78 keV (Au-198), 675.93 keV (Au-198), 823.51 ...
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161 views

Is WiFi safe for humans? [closed]

I have wifi on at my home almost all the time. I learned that the frequency of visible light is around several hundreds of THz, while the frequency of wifi is only several GHz, which is only ...
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Rutherford alpha scattering?

From Rutherfords alpha scattering, where alpha where fired at a thin peace of metal foil, he concluded that the nuclie was positivly charged. He made this conclution from the fact that alpha particles ...
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146 views

Effects of microwaves on optical properties of human eye [closed]

I have read a long series of paragraphs on wiki. Previously I thought that microwaves are not harmful to living beings but Wiki does not claim this explicitly. while doing an experiment in my college ...
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141 views

Interaction of coherent X-rays with matter

If we could irradiate a metal or a plasma with a coherent beam of hard X-rays, would the main effect be an ordered oscillation of the electrons like with a classical EM wave, or "compton-style" ...
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115 views

The equal opposite reaction of radiation pressure

If the photons of a laser would produce a radiation pressure upon whatever it shown upon wouldn't it be accurate to say that the laser would be propelled in the opposite direction of its beam?
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Effect of Background Radiation on a Transmitted Signal

I'm coding a basic simulation of using error correcting codes to transmit data from a satellite back to earth. I'm not sure what to set the "noise level" to. Let's say a satellite orbiting Mars ...
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1k views

Finding electric power generated using heat transfer

I'm working through an example I have been given to study. Suppose I have a 2m X 4m photovoltaic panel on my roof that is irradiated with a solar flux of $G_s = 700W/m^2$. Given: $\alpha_s = 0.83$ ...
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How is the “negative dispersion” derived?

I'm looking at Kopfermann H., Ladenburg R., Nature, 122, 338-339 (1928) and it appears Ladenburg in Ladenburg R., Z.Physik, 4, 451-468 (1921) was the first to discover the phenomenon of "negative ...
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Do molecular bounded systems shield or reduce neutron cross-sections?

When talking about neutron cross-sections, literature is usually investigating isolated cases of Neutron + Atom. Here, the abundance of hydrogen is dominating neutron fluxes through material. I ...
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225 views

What does the decay constant mean?

In my curriculum, the decay constant is "the probability of decay per unit time" To me, this seems non-sensical, as the decay constant can be greater than one, which would imply that a particle has a ...
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Are dangerous rays emitted during Solar Eclipse?

It is said one should avoid staring at Sun as it can damage the eyes, but it is also said that one should not come out in sun during eclipse as it emits dangerous rays. Is that true? If yes, why?
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406 views

Nuclear decay rate affected by sun and quantum randomness

If nuclear decay rate were affected by sun, then emission probabilities would be subject to sun state and its influence, so quantum randomness would depend on it, Would it still be truly random? One ...
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286 views

How to detect radiation on the metal (coin)?

I've got metal coin : http://www.worldpeacecoin.org/ Ruble/dollar, a coin of disarmament with certificate. But, I am very spleeny person, I fear of it's radiance level and I don't know if I can trust ...
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375 views

How to detect Iodine 131?

$I_{131}\rightarrow \beta \text{ 333.8 KeV(7.27%)}\rightarrow \gamma\text{ 636.989 KeV(7.17%)}$ $I_{131}\rightarrow\beta\text{ 606.3KeV(89.9%)}\rightarrow\gamma\text{ 364.489KeV(81.7%)}$ (you can ...
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482 views

Antimatter bomb

I stumbled upon this wikipedia article on antimatter weaponry. Being greatly appalled by the sad fact that large sums of money are being wasted on this, I could not stop myself from thinking for a ...
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246 views

Reconstruction of information stored in an evaporating black hole from the emission spectrum?

For simple setups, where the radiation field deviates not too far from thermodynamic equilibrium (< 10 %), corrections to the Planckian thermal emission spectrum can be calculated (and measured) ...
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Creation of the Electromagnetic Spectrum [closed]

After seeing this image: http://mynasadata.larc.nasa.gov/images/EM_Spectrum3-new.jpg And reading this: "The long wavelength limit is the size of the universe itself, while it is thought that the ...
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469 views

Is data which rides on the carrier frequency dangerous?

My understanding of broadcasting data via electromagnetic radition is, that the data "rides" on a carrier frequency on which it is radiated. I am aware of the fact, that those carrier frequencies are ...
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235 views

Any real life demonstrations of radioactive decay? [duplicate]

I'm skeptical about a lot of things in physics, but I have a great interest in it and I'm studying it in college next year. However I am very skeptical about some things. I find that for physics, it ...
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113 views

Extreme heating by Sun on Earth- Can eggs be fried?

Will it be possible to fry eggs in Sahara desert by just keeping them under the sun? If so, then will the radiated eggs be any different? Or will we have to use the solar cooking concept to some ...
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68 views

Cobalt 60 beta decay

In the beta decay of an atom of Co60, the radiation you would expect is one or two gamma rays, plus an electron plus an electron neutrino (and in the nucleus Ni60+, if I understand it well). However, ...
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32 views

Explanation of binding energy in decays

Everyone knows that the mass of a system is less than the mass of its components, with the equation: $M = \sum_i m_i - BE(M) $ Now, if we consider a general decay, lets say $A \rightarrow \sum_i ...
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What causes different decays?

Nuclei spontaneously decay according to a certain decay rate. There are however different kinds of decay, alpha, beta, gamma... What causes then the nuclei, when they decay, to do so in one way of ...
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Is it possible to calculate the half-life of a nucleus?

Is it possible to calculate theoretically the half life of a nucleus (how?) or they are all known through measurements? As an example how do you calculate the half life of Carbon-14?
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53 views

Proof of the inverse square law for a uniformly bright sphere

On page 8 of "Radiative processes in Astrophysics" by Rybicki and Lightman they have a proof that the flux of a uniform sphere is inversely proportional to the distance of the sphere from the ...
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192 views

Conservation of mass-energy and nuclear transmutation

This may just be beyond the grasp of the everyman, but I'm trying, and failing, to grasp how conservation of mass-energy works in cases of beta decay and electron capture. A neutron has a mass of one ...
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A hot object exposed to low temperature in a vacuum doesn't lose heat?

I heard somewhere that if the human body were exposed to outer space where the temperature is extremely low, the human won't actually feel cold because in a vacuum, the heat energy doesn't have ...
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276 views

$\alpha$ and $\beta$-decay, why don't they neutralize each other?

$\alpha$ radiation consist of positive charged helium nuclei, $\beta$ radiation of negative charged electrons. So why don't the $\alpha$ particles take those electrons to get neutral?
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83 views

How damaging is light? [closed]

On Surely You're Joking Mr Feynman, when talking about the Trinity test, the author states: the only thing that could really hurt your eyes (bright light can never hurt your eyes) is ultraviolet ...
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87 views

Physics and Skin Color: What differences do physicists observe between different skin colors?

I majored in social sciences, so I haven't taken a science class since 1999, so forgive me if I don't ask this right. What difference would skin color make from a physics perspective? Would there be ...
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How to measure the wavelengths of ultraviolet lines in the hydrogen spectrum?

how to measure the wavelengths of ultraviolet radiation isn't it invisible? it's possible to measure visible radiation but how to measure invisible radiation?
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2k views

Kirchhoff law of thermal radiation

Kirchhoff's law of thermal radiation states that for thermal equilibrium for a particular surface the monochromatic emissivity $\epsilon_{\lambda}$ equals the monochromatic absorptivity ...
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93 views

What type of Radiation hits Europa

I was recently reading the Wikipedia Page for Europa as I am interested in terra-formation. In one of the sentences, it says that: The radiation level at the surface of Europa is equivalent to a ...
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Alpha particle and helium nucleus

The symbol for the alpha particle is α or $α^{2+}$, it can be written as $He^{2+}$. What I want to know is that, are they same? I mean alpha particle and helium nucleus are same or any subtle ...
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Nuclear transition notation

I have a question which asks me to determine what x is for the following nuclear transition $$^{29}Si(\alpha, n)X$$ But I don't have any idea what this notation implies. Another example: ...
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189 views

$\Omega_{r}$ from WMAP results?

To do some Friedmann-Lemaître cosmology calculations, I would like to know an estimation of $\Omega_{r_0}$ ($\Omega$ radiation today). WMAP 7 give estimation of $\Omega_{b}$, $\Omega_{c}$ and ...
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28 views

Calculate transparency from Beer-Lambert Law

I want to calculate a transparency parameter for a superposition of several volumes containing media using the Beer-Lambert Law, which states that $$I/I_0=exp(-\tau)$$ where $I$ is the transmitted ...
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51 views

Is it possible to generate electric energy from the radiation of radioactive materials

I wonder if it is possible to generate electric energy from the radiation of radioactive materials like nuclear waste? If it is then wouldn't that also mean that it could be used as an energy source ...
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internal conversion and the electromagnetic force

I have read that the mechanism behind internal conversion, in which a nuclear transition leads to the ejection of an electron in one of the lower atomic orbitals, is related to the fact that the ...
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55 views

Blackbody radiation and Spectral Lines [duplicate]

Blackbody radiation is thermal radiation from a hot object emitted over a continuous range of wavelengths. But why are spectral lines, lines (i.e., you only get certain wavelengths when an element is ...
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72 views

Use of fission products for electricity generation

Why can't we use fissions products for electricity production ? As far has I know fissions products from current nuclear power plants create enough 'waste' heat to boil water; and temperature ...
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75 views

Why doesn't diamond glow when hot?

In an answer to this SE question, the respondent explains that heating a perfect diamond will not cause it to glow with thermal blackbody radiation. I don't quite follow his explanation. I think it ...
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69 views

interior surface of furnaces

For industrial furnaces, in order to improve radiation heat transfer and save energy, some people say applying a high emissivity coating on to the interior surface of a furnace will do, while some ...
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151 views

Does blackbody radiation work like this?

In a blackbody object the photons are reflected back and forward. If I heat up the the blackbody object with microwaves or other types of photons the electrons in the wall would vibrate. When the ...
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Is terahertz radiation new?

Regarding the future applications of terahertz technology, I thought we already knew the entire electromagnetic spectrum. In fact we do not, terahertz lies between microwaves and infrared radiation. ...
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Absorption of radiation due to temperature

I was wondering if the temperature of an object affects the amount of radiation it absorbs. For example, if I have a box that is hotter, will it absorb more energy as compared to the same cooler box? ...