Radiation is a process in which energetic particles or energetic waves travel through a medium or space. The particles or waves radiate (i.e., travel outward in all directions) from a source.

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Confusion about radioactivity

The following question is from General Problems on Physics by I.E Irodov 6.220. Find the decay constant and the mean lifetime of $^{55}\operatorname{Co}$ radionuclide if its activity is known to ...
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Smart capsules for radioactive metals

If we add or remove an election to the atoms of radioactive metals, they will become the isotopes of their adjacent chemical elements in the periodic table. I ask the community whether the resulted ...
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Measuring Activity

The formula for Activity of a radioactive substance is $ \frac{dN}{dt}=A=λN $. If we have an initial number $N(0)$ of some Radionuclide, which has a halflife of, say, 12 hours, is there any ...
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Modeling total absorption using absorbance of multiple visual layers

I have a question involving light absorbance versus absorption. It applies to a stack of different photoreceptor types. I understand the difference between absorbance, which is basically equal to ...
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Question on decay constant

I have a model of the radioactivity of a target which is undergoing Neutron Spallation. The Protons are incident upon the target for approximately 200 hours. Within the model, over the course of ...
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1answer
63 views

Is (or why isn't) static charge as lethal as ionizing radiation?

Ionizing radiation, e.g. the "stuff" emitted by radioactive materials, is dangerous to humans since changes to the electron configurations (in the human body) causes the various molecules (in the ...
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3answers
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Can a single particle be “heated” by radiation?

From the point of view of statistical thermodynamics, a single particle doesn't have a phase (state of matter), nor temperature. What would happen if heat is transported to this single particle via ...
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1answer
74 views

Determination of radiation pressure

Consider the incidence of an electromagnetic wave on the plane $x=0$. We have that: $$f_x=\frac{dF}{dV}$$ $f_x$ is the volumic force density on the medium. My doubt is purely mathematical. I ...
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Is the direction of gamma-ray emission by a nucleus totally random?

Let's consider an excited nucleus emitting one gamma-ray (not cascade etc). Is the direction of gamma-ray emission completely random? In other words, is the probability to detect this gamma equal for ...
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If UV radiation 1 cm away from the halogen bulb is equal to Sun's radiation, what is the level of radiation 1 meter away?

Halogen light bulbs emit some amount of UV radiation, and some sources consider them dangerous. Here it is written, that UV radiation (of certain types) from a particular halogen bulb was equal to the ...
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1answer
57 views

How can a string vibrating in a plane radiate sound?

If a plucked guitar string vibrates in a plane, how are waves produced that travel in all directions? I'd have thought that a vibrating string can only produce waves in its plane of motion.
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Why doesn't the formula for the Einstein coeff contain a radius?

I am trying to understand the Einstein coefficients and using the formula found on wikipedia ,the coefficient for spontaneous emission is equal to (emission coeff * 4*pi)/(hfn2) (first formula on ...
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1answer
43 views

Method used to prove emissive power, $E \propto T^4$

Stefan's Law states that emissive power($E$) of a black body is proportional to $T^4$. But how did Stefan arrive at the conclusion? I mean, it is not possible currently to get a perfectly black body, ...
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81 views

How does a photon raise the temperature of a gas?

The temperature of a fixed volume of a gas is increased when it interacts with radiation. Why does the temperature increase (i.e. why does the velocity of a gas molecule increase) when a photon is ...
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48 views

wave propagation (refractive index gradient) [closed]

I have 2 questions and need some advice from you all. A $30\,\mathrm{km}$ microwave link operates at $4\,\mathrm{Ghz}$ using $4\,\mathrm{m}$ parabolic reflector antennas. the transmit antenna is ...
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1answer
137 views

What happens to mass during beta decay?

Sorry for being ignorant, but I'm in high school and our chemistry teacher barely went over beta decay. I decided to do some research and learned that in β+ decay, positrons are emitted from protons ...
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2answers
125 views

What would be the dose rate of 109 grams of uranium per day/year?

I know that with a Pancake probe that can read alpha you can get up to 30K CPM on a small plate. I ordered a 6" red plate off ebay and measured outside the box when it came in. It registered around ...
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60 views

signal from uniformly moving charge

As a charge moves, its field changes, and this change can only be propagated outward at the speed of light. Thus the field lines will be curves that keep changing apparent source point and direction. ...
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27 views

How do amorphous objects emit blackbody/thermal radiation? [duplicate]

How do amorphous objects emit blackbody/thermal radiation when such objects don't have optical phonons?
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1answer
104 views

Meaning of angles on Feynman diagram

In physics class, I am currently studying Feynman diagrams. We are taught the basics like conservation of charge and the direction of time but the examples in my book all seem to follow specific paths ...
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1answer
34 views

Order of emission of radioactive particles

Is there any sort of sequence in the emission of radioactive particles? ie. alpha, beta, gamma or any other type of decay I don't know about. Specifically, I wanted to know is there any evidence to ...
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1answer
98 views

Can a sample of beta radiation be considered as the fabled philosophers stone? [closed]

Given that it is possible to produce gold in nuclear reactors (even if not economical), is there a natural source of beta radiation whose half life is similar to that of human lifetime and whose beta ...
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1answer
22 views

How does an object in vacuum loose its temperature? [duplicate]

Well, it radiates in the infrared, I guess. But how exactly are these photons created? The atoms have some kinetic energy, which makes up the temperature. So while the atoms or molecules jitter a bit ...
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Is there an orbit decay associated with synchrotron radiation of a relativistic particle?

I had a question about a particle (say a proton) with relativistic energies interacts with a magnetic field (in the z direction). As it is accelerates the particle emits synchrotron radiation. ...
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1answer
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Models for populations of decay products

I'm looking to create a population model for the specific nuclides in a neutron spallation source. The source is a target (Tantalum clad Tungsten) which is being bombarded with protons, and in turn is ...
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1answer
32 views

Notation on chart of the isotopes

I recently purchased a complete chart of the isotopes, (this one: https://shop.marktdienste.de/shoppages/produktuebersicht.aspx ) and have it on the wall next to me in work. The different coloured ...
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How to detect a secret nuclear detonation here on the earth?

How can we know that North Korea and Iran (to name a few) are exploding nuclear weapons if no inspectors have ever been granted access to suspected nuclear sites in these countries? How can we ...
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1answer
134 views

How much radiation does the Earth receive from the Sun's total radiation? [closed]

I was thinking how to solve this problem. $1\,\mathrm{AU}$ is roughly the distance from the Earth to the Sun, $1.4960 \times 10^{11}\,\mathrm{m}$. The radius of Earth is approximately $6.4 \times ...
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1answer
32 views

Radioisotope beta decay generator

Why are there no electrical generators utilising the electron/s of beta decay from a radioisotope for generating a working current? For example, how much radioisotope would I need to generate 1A or ...
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Why spurious pulses are likely in partial discharges?

My notes The gas multiplication in the proportional counters is based on the secondary ionization created in collisions between electrons and neutral gas molecules, resulting in some visible ...
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2answers
77 views

Measuring the energy of an alpha particle

I would like to measure the energies of particles emitted from a variety of ionizing radiation sources (alpha and beta), and then convert these energies to velocities. However, I am not too sure about ...
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2answers
71 views

In Electron Spin Resonance, what provides the energy for the transition?

I recently performed an ESR experiment at M.Sc. level. The experiment manual says that the energy for the transition is provided by magnetic field oscillating at radio frequency. I am little confused ...
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1answer
55 views

How does scintillation gamma-spectrometers work?

As far as I understand, the incident photon interacts by photoelectric, Compton scattering or pair production with the electrons of the crystal (NaI(Tl) in our case). The electron that emerges from ...
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58 views

To what altitudes does cosmic radiation penetrate?

How far does high energy (Cosmic) radiation penetrate(km above sea level) into the planet earth? And at what rate(/m^2/s)? (limited set of rates here) (The Aurora is low energy protons that stop at 90 ...
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74 views

Bismuth vs tungsten shielding

When shielding 1250-keV $^{60}$Co at a nuclear facility, are there instances in which a shield produced of a mixture of bismuth and silicon can provide higher/equal attenuation than a shield produced ...
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1answer
95 views

Spontaneous radiative decay due to electric dipole radiation

In my textbook, we calculated the rate at which an electric dipole radiates energy to be $Pwr = \frac{1}{4\pi \epsilon_0}\frac{2}{3c^3}\left(\frac{d^2 p}{dt^2} \right)^2$ where p is the dipole ...
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56 views

Electric field radiation with moving charge and observation point

I've been working on Chapter 34 of the first volume of the Feynman Lectures on Physics http://www.feynmanlectures.caltech.edu/I_34.html#Ch34-S1. In Fig. 34–3 (reproduced above) Prof. Feynman shows ...
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1answer
95 views

What produces this 477 keV spectral line?

Question about a specific line on a gamma spectrum, here. Below is a background gamma spectrum observed by a Ge[li] detector. I've been able to identify all the lines with mostly certainty, apart ...
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1answer
41 views

Gamma spectrum: Question about cross sections

If I have a gamma spectrum and I suspect that I should have an isotope, Fe-59 for example, present in the environment, I will then look here: ...
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3answers
612 views

Fission of U-235 produces Cs-137 along with…?

Question about Nuclear fission in general, here. If I have the fission of U-235 and I know that one of the products is Cs-137, is there a way of figuring out the other product? Should there be ...
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Earth's magnetic field shields us… from what threat?

This is a nice artistic picture of the magnet field of the earth, shielding us from the solar wind. (source) Wherever you look, it is stated that without our shield, life would not be possible on ...
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180 views

Matter to energy conversion

Okay so I have a question, during a nuclear explosion or particle/antiparticle annihilation, matter is converted into energy. How do I determine if a from a explosion will come lets say a small ...
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1answer
55 views

Nuclear decay of V-48

I have a question on the "decay" of Vanadium-48. The reason it's in inverted commas is because I'm not sure whether decay is the right word. Basically what I'm trying to work out is whether it's ...
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How gamma rays are produced? [closed]

Radio active materials emit alpha beta and gamma rays. My question is, what causes (at subatomic level) an atom to produce such a powerful gamma rays and Suppose if I bring a fluorescent bulbs nearby ...
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Lens-Mirror systems and conservation of specific intensity

This came out of a discussion I started yesterday and a related discussion I found. I'll recap the problem quickly: Consider two blackbodies, with surface areas $A_1$ and $A_2$ and temperatures $T_1$ ...
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1answer
103 views

Definition of Sievert (Sv) unit - is it whole body mass?

I'm wondering about the definition of the Sievert (Sv) unit. It is J/Kg but is that Kg the mass of the whole body or just of the exposed body part? For instance, when a table says that an x-ray of a ...
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1answer
51 views

Light is EM radiation or field [duplicate]

What is Difference between EM Radiation and EM Field. Are They all are different quantities or interrelated with each other. Do they both follow inverse square law.Is light EM radiation or Field
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What is the strongest material transparent to alpha radiation?

Is there a material which is transparent to alpha radiation while being able to hold up under atmospheric pressure on one side and ultra high vacuum on the other? Put simply, what material is thin ...
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Why conductors don't scatter light?

Air molecules can be oscillated by E field and re-radiate EM waves in different directions. However, if light is shined to a conductor the E field oscillate the free charges but the effect is to ...
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How do we tell the CMB apart from other radiation?

Say I want to observe the CMB and the CMB only. I point my device (telescope in some frequency range) at the sky and start looking. How do I know it should be in the Microwave spectrum? How do I ...