Radiation is a process in which energetic particles or energetic waves travel through a medium or space. The particles or waves radiate (i.e., travel outward in all directions) from a source.

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How to see alpha radiation

Hello I am looking to replicate the double-slit experiment using alpha radiation from a sample of Polonium-210. Keep in mind that I would need to put it in a vacuum so cloud chambers would not work. I ...
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Finding the geometric efficiency of a cylindrical Marinelli beaker

I want to find the geometric efficiency of a cylindrical marinelli beaker filled with soil to perform gamma spectroscopy, so essentially the ratio of rays that pass through the detector to the overall ...
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462 views

What is the amplitude of the electric field in a laser?

I'm looking for reliable informations about the amplitude (not the intensity), in volt/meter, of the electric field in a typical laser. Or in other words : what are the typical amplitudes of the ...
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DNA breaks with particles or photons (Radiation therapy)

When protons (or other particles) or photons are used in radiation therapy to treat cancer patients, the main effect is for it to make DNA breaks that hopefully will make the cancer cell die ...
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39 views

Black Body radiation (intensity in certain distance)

i need some help with this task: I have a black body radiator which is spherical and it has radius $r=0.56m$. It radiates with intensity $1.5\frac{kW}{m^2}$. I would like to know the intensity in ...
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60 views

Emissivity and Final Temperature of a Black and White object

Objects can be categorized as blackbodies (emissivity $\epsilon = 1$), grey bodies (emissivity $\epsilon < 1$) and white bodies (emissivity $\epsilon = 0$). If we placed two objects (identical ...
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Carnot Engine- Cold Reservoir is a black body [closed]

My question: A satellite powered by a Carnot engine uses heat from a nuclear reactor at a fixed temperature T0. Heat is released into outer space via thermal radiation emitted by a set of fins at ...
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1answer
74 views

In a waveguide, where does the energy in attenuated waves go?

In an electromagnetic waveguide, there is generally a "cutoff frequency." Electromagnetic waves with a frequency that is lower than this cutoff frequency will not propagate at all -- i.e., they will ...
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58 views

Charge moved across a potential difference; where does the energy for emitted radiation come from?

Let's use an electron and a 1V potential difference as a mode. In school I learned that if the electron is at the negative end of the electric field, its potential energy is equal to the work that ...
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Pearmeability of various materials by EM-waves of cell-phones

Is there any way I can show (even if approximately) that one needs x cm of glass, y cm of brick, z cm of reinforced concrete, etc. to block cell-phone signal of a certain frequency and strength? I ...
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40 views

Lead shielding very close to the Sun

I understand that eventually lead would melt when it nears the sun. In a liquid state how effective would lead be in blocking radiation? Would it still be as effective as solid state of lead? What ...
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27 views

Illuminance on the vertical façade from the ground

I am trying to understand the illuminance on a vertical façade from the light reflected from the ground. And am reading this through Daylighting and Architecture book. On page 41 it makes use of two ...
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66 views

What is radiative width?

I am trying to understand gamma radiation and trying to figure out how to calculate radiative width. Is the radiative width how far the atom can be from another one and the probability of it then ...
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Alpha Radiation - Charges [duplicate]

Has the radiating material that emits only alpha radiation a negative charge? I am just wondering, because alpha radiation is a positive charged helium ion - so where are the electrons going?
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In non-metallic solids w/ just atoms or ions (no molecules), are bonds (vibrations) and electronic transitions the sole cause of blackbody radiation?

Since there wouldn't be a conduction band filled with any electrons in a non-metallic solid made of just atoms or ions (no molecules), it's hard to imagine any other type of movement and dipole moment ...
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1answer
59 views

Can you concencrate paralel laser beams?

I've seen some videos of laser toys but they all seem to use either one laser or lens with some specific range of focus. What I was thinking is this: But it seems like it might violate the 2nd law ...
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63 views

Radioactive decay-Why does it depend on numbers left

As textbooks describe the rate law for radioactive decay as a first order reaction dN/dt=kN,why is it so(mine does not give the reason)? How is the radioactive decay of one atom depeendent on the ...
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64 views

Probability of photon to photon collision

2 photons having sufficient energy can collide and form an electron positron pair (which then annihilate and form a new photon pair - with lower energy?). I assume this means that they can't collide (...
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84 views

Why does lead have a higher attenuation coefficient for 5.0 MeV than for 10.0 MeV?

I was doing some calculations on radiation, and I noticed that lead has a higher attenuation coefficient for 5.0 MeV than for 10.0 MeV, namely $1.44 \, \mathrm{cm}^{-1}$ for the former and $1.23 \, \...
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130 views

How does the discrete energies of alpha and gamma rays prove the existence of nuclear energy levels

I was reading up about Nuclear Energy Levels and came up with the aforementioned question. To me, there seems to be no direct connection between the two statements and therefore, I would like to know ...
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The angular diameter distance for a radiation dominated universe

I'm attempting to work out the angular diameter distance for a radiation dominated universe, with $k=0$ and $\Lambda=0$. I have gotten myself to this point: $$ D_{A}=\frac{1}{H_{0}(1+z)}\int^{z}_{0}...
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30 views

Calculating solar irradiance of Earth [closed]

The mean solar radiation flux absorbed per unit area of Earth’s surface, neglecting the atmosphere, is calculated as FS(1-A)/4, where FS is the solar constant and A is albedo. I can see how this would ...
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Definition of emissivity?

A have come across a definition of emissivity which is along the following lines: Emissivity is the power emitted per solid angle per frequency per surface area. This definition, however seems ...
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Using ion radiation to make electricity? [duplicate]

Is it possible to capture the ion radiation from a nuclear source and make electricity from it? I always thought it was possible, but never looked into it? Is this what a beta voltaic battery does?
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How to integrate to find the view factor of two parallel disks of different radii? [closed]

You have two parallel coaxial disks of different radii. I have tables that give me the value as $$F_{ij} = \tfrac{1}{2} [S - \sqrt{S^2 - 4(r_j/r_i)^2}]$$ where $$S = 1 + \frac{1 + R_j^2}{R_i^2}$$ ...
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Protonic emissions

In a beta emission a neutron decays,into a proton and an electron, and an electron randomly gets ejected from the nucleus due to the phenomenon of barrier tunnelling(correct me if am wrong).But why is ...
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19 views

How much power is being actually delivered by an electric heater to a cooking pan?

I've been doing experiments on an electric heater heating a cooking pan filled with 2 litres of water, from 20°C to 70°C; now I'm trying to draw a theoretical heat transfer model thath should match ...
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1answer
32 views

In solids, is it phonons, or is it the oscillations of electrons in bands, that emit most of the blackbody radiation?

In solids (most any object we see), which tends to emit most of the blackbody radiation: phonons (atomic, or molecular dipole, lattice vibrations) or oscillating electrons in their energy bands?
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33 views

Is an “underwater” submarine affected by a nuclear bomb exploding above the water? [duplicate]

I've just read Would being underwater help survive a nuclear bomb?. Submarines are way more armored and far from the surface than a human body (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Submarine_depth_ratings), ...
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33 views

Can we enhance a thermal gradient by combining a dark surface and a shiny surface with an external glass layer?

I refer to the article at this site: http://solarcooking.wikia.com/wiki/Solar_Kettle-Thermos_Flask As we know, dark surfaces absorb radiation (eg. solar water heater), while shiny surfaces reflect ...
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2answers
52 views

Why photoluminescene spectrum is not identical to electroluminescence spectrum?

Electroluminescence (EL) and photoluminescence (PL) spectra are not identical: there's a small red-shift of the PL spectrum relative to the EL spectrum. Why is this happening if both EL and PL are ...
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1answer
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Why does natural counting with a gamma spectrometer differ from Neutron activation analysis?

As stated in the title, why are the data from natural counting using s gamma spectrometer different than the data from neutron activation analysis using the same samples?
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72 views

Why is there only alpha and beta (and gamma) decay?

Why is it that we mostly speak of alpha and beta decay (when looking at emitted particles with rest mass)? Why don't we speak of decays that emit something like $2n3p$, $3n2p$ and so on? Do they occur ...
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1answer
44 views

How is the stellar flux for exoplanets calculated?

I have noticed that in many Wikipedia articles, the stellar flux received by each planet is stated. I tried to calculate this stellar flux from the given data, but the results didn't seem to be ...
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Half- life of Radon

If there is increase in the pressure of a container with radon in it , what will happen to the half life of radon?
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What is the Best Electron Tube for creating X-Rays?

This is a question of Experimental Physics. I have seen that you can create X-Rays with a High Voltage Circuit using Electron Tubes. http://www.dangerouslaboratories.org/xray1.html. My question is, ...
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solar energy on a specific location

How to find the amount of solar wattage in any specific place on earh in a monthly manner? by solar wattage I mean the energy recieved from the sun in a squared meters.
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1answer
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Solar radiation conversion check [closed]

I'm analysing some solar radiation data, which is the calculated as the daily sum of PAR in MJ per m$^2$ per day. Assuming that PAR makes 42% from total irradiance, how can I convert this to solar ...
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1answer
67 views

Can electrons within a positive ion absorb and reflect light?

I understand that in a crystalline metallic structure, such as one making up a bar of gold, there are one, or more, valance electrons of each atom that have left their outer shell (became free ...
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Why is the intensity of an alpha ray constant along a material?

I'm taking a course in radiation physics and I've come across the following problem: A thin beam of alpha particles of intensity $I_0$ and energy $E_0$ impacts in a material. What is the intensity ...
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How many photons are there in free space on average

Estimates of the amount of for example "dark matter" are of interest to the cosmologists. However, I have never seen an estimate of how many "free" photons could be speeding about in the known ...
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Fermi's theory of beta decay - Does Fermi's Hamiltonian have the wrong transformation properties?

I'm studying the theory of beta decays as proposed by Fermi in the 30's, and I found an inconsistency between the transformation properties that he claims for his Hamiltonian and the transformation ...
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72 views

Cesium-137 From Fukushima Meltdown

I've been reading up on the Fukushima nuclear meltdown and its effects it had on the environment. The iodine-131 initially released from the incident decayed after 8 days, but other isotopes such as ...
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50 views

Are the leptons in $\beta^-$ decay already present in the nucleus in some form?

In beta minus decay, beta-minus particle and anti-neutrino are ejected, leaving behind daughter nucleus. $\beta^-$ and anti-neutrino both are leptons. Were the leptons already present in the ...
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108 views

Long distance radiation detection, David Hahn and the clock

The strange character David Hahn, obsessed with creating a nuclear reactor since a young age, was reportedly wandering around his neighborhood with a Geiger counter and by this means he located a ...
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1answer
45 views

Have cosmic rays and the CMB affected Earth's history?

Do cosmic rays and the cosmic microwave background carry with them enough energy to have a macroscopic effect on events on Earth? The most obvious example I can think of is by giving animals cancer. ...
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Does an atom become positively charged as a result of Beta decay? [duplicate]

Since a neutron breaks down into an electron and a proton, and the electron is emitted as beta particles, the atom has an extra proton (protons>electrons). So, the atom becomes positively charged. But ...
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Can neutrinos cause $^{14}\rm C\to\,^{14} N$ beta-decay?

I half-heard in a lecture that radiocarbon beta-decay is caused by neutrinos passing close to the nuclei & weakly interacting with one of the carbon neutrons, flipping it to a proton and producing ...
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How deep would a moonbase have to be dug for radiation protection?

The atmosphere of the earth protects us from cosmic rays and other kinds of space radiation. On the moon there is little to no atmosphere so anyone on the surface of the moon is directly exposed to ...
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Electron energy from beta decay

I read in my IB-physics book that the average energy for an electron in the beta decay of Potassium-40 is 0.44 MeV. However this would imply the electron have a velocity of 3.9E8 m/s, i.e. faster than ...