Quantum mechanics describes the microscopic properties of nature in a regime where classical mechanics no longer applies. It explains phenomena such as the wave-particle duality, quantization of energy and the uncertainty principle and is generally used in single body systems. Use the ...

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expanding universe and speed of light

galaxies are mo ving away from us proportional to the distance between us and them , but nothing can travel faster than light , so our universe cannot be larger than a specific limit if it is so ...
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3answers
167 views

Is the Wikipedia version of the Heisenberg equation of motion correct?

Back in 2011, this question asked about the Wikipedia version of the Heisenberg equation of motion for an operator $A$: \begin{equation*} \frac{d}{dt} A(t) = \frac{i}{\hbar} \left[ H, A(t) \right] + ...
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1answer
42 views

Entanglement ladder algebra and quantization of entanglement

Usually in QFT, even optical quantum mechanics papers, usually resort to describe n-states in terms of the ladder algebra, plus a parameter for polarization, but the entanglement information is ...
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1answer
227 views

What is the Philosophy Behind Relational Quantum Mechanics?

I watched this video on Relational Quantum Mechanics yesterday and my brain has been trying to comprehend it since. The interpretation I currently have is this: If an observer O measures the state S ...
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1answer
66 views

Singlet state and it's expectation value

So. We have a singlet sate $$ \dfrac{1}{\sqrt{2}}(\vert\uparrow\downarrow\rangle-\vert\downarrow\uparrow\rangle)$$ And two pauli matrices for z axis - one that acts on 1st spin (lets denote it with ...
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34 views

Fermion commutation relations QFT question

Consider left-handed fermions in two spacetime dimensions $(t,x)$: $\psi_L=\frac{1}{2}(1-\gamma_5)\psi_D$ with $J_0^\epsilon(t,x)=\psi_L^+(x+\epsilon)\psi_L(x-\epsilon)$. (a). Use canonical ...
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29 views

Applicability of perturbation theory

Consider some system in some initial state $|k^{(0)}\rangle$. The probability that such a state makes a transition to some other state $|m^{(0)}\rangle$ can be computed to various orders in time ...
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25 views

Quartic interacion

I want to change Lagrangian with coupling constant lambda in quartic interaction so that coupling constant will be negative like in unstable vacuum state. This unstable state I want to describe. Can ...
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0answers
53 views

What does it mean “Hawking radiation is in a pure state”?

I'm trying to understand black hole paradox but I'm not sure if I understand what does it mean "Hawking radiation is in a pure state". Does it mean if Hawking radiation is in a mixed state then ...
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0answers
55 views

Are the particle-wave duality and the quantum uncertainty principle united? [duplicate]

In a recent paper by Patrick Coles, Jedrzej Kaniewski, and Stephanie Wehner at the Centre for Quantum Technologies at the National University of Singapore, they came to the conclusion that the ...
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1answer
58 views

spooky nonlocal communication, or bad abstract?

I'm referring to this recent paper, "Experimental Proof of Nonlocal Wavefunction Collapse for a Single Particle Using Homodyne Measurements" by Fuwa et al. published in Nature Communications. ...
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30 views

Integration measure

Consider the field being decomposed into a orthogonal and completed basis: $\Phi(x) = \sum_n c_n \phi_n(x)$ (or $\Phi(x) = \int dk c_k \phi_k (x)$, if continuous) The notation: $\phi_n(x) = ...
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2answers
139 views

Does Bell's theorem sort out local field theories?

For example the Maxwell's equations is a local theory. It's a set of differential equations that describe how should the state at a point change based on its neighbourhood. Counter example: Newtonian ...
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0answers
20 views

Analogies between Fraunhofer diffraction and Josephson junctions

There are several analogies between diffraction patterns and Josephson junctions, especially between a double slit experiment and two Josephson junctions in a superconducting ring (like this): Both ...
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1answer
28 views

What is the definition of parity conservation?

I searched quite hard, and am still confused what is the exact definition of parity conservation? For example, we have quantum system with initial state $\Phi_i$, and after decaying it comes to final ...
2
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1answer
178 views

How does many-worlds interpretation make measurement unitary?

Does many-worlds interpretation of QM make the process of measurement (wavefunction collapse) be an unitary transform? If so, how does it do this? If we have an "object" qubit in state ...
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6answers
343 views

Born's rule and Schrödinger's equation

In non-relativistic quantum mechanics, the equation of evolution of the quantum state is given by Schrödinger's equation and measurement of a state of particle is itself a physical process. Thus, ...
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2answers
94 views
+50

Spin in magnetic field and eigenvalues

We have some arbitrary quantum state, lets say $$\vert\Psi\rangle=\alpha_{1}\vert\uparrow\rangle+\alpha_{2}\vert\downarrow\rangle= \begin{pmatrix} \alpha_{1} \\ \alpha_{2} \\ \end{pmatrix}$$. And ...
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1answer
31 views

Can we say an atom is ferromagnetic?

Some atoms have nonzero magnetic moments. Does it make sense to say they are ferromagnetic? Or should we say it is paramagnetic?
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3answers
163 views

Quantum circuit equivalent of quantum pseudo-telepathy game

I'm trying to understand the wikipedia article on quantum pseudotelepathy. I've been trying to figure out the quantum circuits the players can use to win the game from the wiki article. (Level of ...
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4answers
211 views

Understanding the Quantum Vacuum State [duplicate]

In terms of the creation and annihilation operators $a_{j}$ and $a_{j}^{\dagger}$ (fermionic or bosonic, doesn't matter): Is the vacuum state $\mid\mathrm{vacuum}\rangle$ exactly the zero vector on ...
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0answers
21 views

Minimum Uncertainty Wavepackets

I'm reading over some lecture notes on minimum uncertainty wavepackets in quantum mechanics, and I've come across a statement that I'm not entirely convinced by. My take on minimum uncertainty states ...
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0answers
39 views

Anomaly for Majorana fermion?

In 4-spacetime dimension, is there U(1) gauge field chiral anomaly associated with Majorana fermion (or I am not sure if it is equivalent, majorana representation)? Besides, I have read from several ...
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0answers
31 views

Help a layperson out here [on hold]

Lately I have been at it, from my completely laypersons understanding of QM with what I see si fi wooers simply replacing a God watchmaker with a cosmic Bill Gates in place of this. Help me clear this ...
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34 views

$n^\text{th}$ operation of creation and annihilation operators on vacuum

My question is similar to the one that has been posted on this link. In particular I would like to express the following expression in the most compact form: ...
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9answers
3k views

Is it theoretically possible to reach 0 kelvin?

I'm having a discussion with someone. I said that it is -even theoretically- impossible to reach 0K, because that would imply that all molecules in the substance would stand perfectly still. He said ...
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2answers
53 views

In the stern-Gerlach experiement how do we know that the magnets don't change orientation of the electrons to up or down?

I watched this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rg4Fnag4V-E Say the electron's north pole started off 60 degrees from the south pole, since the electron has little mass wouldn't that make it ...
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1answer
27 views

Does a time-varying intensity contribute to the photoelectric effect?

I understand the photoelectric effect demonstrates that electrons are only dislodged from a metal if incident light meets a minimum threshold frequency. I wonder if a varying intensity might also ...
2
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1answer
145 views

Correct way to do a Thomas-Fermi approximation for cold gases

I have calculated the total Gross-Pitaevskii energy for a 2D Bose-Einstein condensate in an harmonical trap, using a variational gaussian wave function with a variational parameter b. Now I want to ...
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3answers
139 views

How does independence of two systems follow from the fact that they are both completely described?

A quote from Landau & Lifshitz (Quantum Mechanics - Non-relativistic Theory, §2): "Let us consider a system composed of two parts, and suppose that the state of this system is given in such a way ...
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2answers
78 views

Binomial expansion of non-commutative operators

I would like to determine the general expansion of $(A+B)^n$, where $[A,B]\neq0$, i.e. A and B are two generally no-commutative operators. How could I express this in terms of summations of the ...
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5answers
182 views
+50

General question about the potential barrier problem: Why does $\exp( kx)$ diverge when $x>0$ in the case when $E < V(x)$?

For the two images below, the first potential barrier has particles approaching it where $E > V_o$ & the second has a particle that has $E < V_o$, where $E$ is the energy of the particles ...
2
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1answer
300 views

Hamiltonian reduction having constant of the motion

I have this $2^n*2^n$ matrix that represent the evolution of a system of $n$ spin. I know that I can have only one excited spin in my configuration a time. (eg: 0110 nor 0101 ar not permitted, but ...
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1answer
45 views

quantum mechanics, lighting mechanics [on hold]

If we were able to place two square mirrors (each other with exactly the same size) perfectly aligned the one mirror facing the other, at a very very close distance that light could not interfere ...
4
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1answer
108 views

Berry's phase: in which space does the degeneracy appear?

This question follows a previous one of mine: Adiabatic theorem and Berry phase. In his original paper [ M. V. Berry, Proc. R. Soc. Lond. A. Math. Phys. Sci. 392, 45 (1984) ], Berry discussed the ...
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1answer
60 views

What exactly is quantum spin? [duplicate]

What is "spin" as it relates to subatomic particles? I've heard that it's similar to angular momentum but I've also heard that's not completely the case.
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4answers
6k views

What is spin as it relates to subatomic particles?

I often hear about subatomic particles having a property called "spin" but also that it doesn't actually relate to spinning about an axis like you would think. Which particles have spin? What does ...
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1answer
86 views

What is many-body bound state?

Bound state by definition is a state when particles are bounded together, so then "many-body bound state" would be bound state for a system of many bodies. Then I have several puzzles: 1. is the state ...
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3answers
173 views

Measurement of quantum state

Consider a particle in a box system. Assume its state to be a superposition of the ground and the first excited energy states. Consider two observers A and B (rest of the world). A made the ...
6
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5answers
2k views

Does entanglement not immediately contradict the theory of special relativity?

Does entanglement not immediately contradict the theory of special relativity? Why are people still so convinced nothing can travel faster than light when we are perfectly aware of something that ...
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1answer
33 views

Do non-Gaussian states always show negativity in phase space?

According to Hudson’s theorem, any pure quantum state with a positive Wigner function is necessarily a Gaussian state. In cases, in which the existing well-known Hudson theorem immediately tells that ...
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1answer
48 views

What sort of operations can be applied on a Hilbert spaces?

I was reading the paper No Universal Flipper for Quantum States. In this paper they have tried to prove by contradiction that a universal flipping machine cannot exist. By flipping I mean if I have a ...
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1answer
50 views

QM: Why is there a minus sign on the Energy operator when using complex conjugate?

I understand how they get the first equation. But I have no idea why there is a minus sign on the second equation: This is from a derivation for the probability density current found here: ...
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1answer
31 views

Quantum GMT and no-communication theorem [on hold]

Knowing exactly the time is important on many fields of physics. What if we had entangled particle pairs, so that one of the particles is at Greenwich and the other wherever we want, but for fun of it ...
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1answer
18 views

What is the reduced width amplitude of an unstable state?

Particularly used in nuclear physics when describing the lifetime (i.e. partial decay width) of a resonant state (a.k.a resonance) is the term "reduced width amplitude". I have searched online, and ...
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1answer
52 views

Calculating L^2 operator in spherical coordinates [closed]

I found this development for the calculation of angular momentum L^2 operator in spherical coordinates. The image attached shows the latest step of this. I cannot figure out the algebra between these ...
3
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0answers
36 views

What makes Bell's original inequality unsuitable for experiments?

Bell derives the inequality $$|E(\vec{a},\vec{b})-E(\vec{a},\vec{c})|\leq 1+E(\vec{b},\vec{c})$$ in his book Speakable and unspeakable in quantum mechanics. In this derivation he uses the assumption ...
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33 views

Given the quantum Zeno effect, won't continual observations of a photon stop/slow down light?

The quantum Zeno effect states that continual observations will prevent motion. Therefore, won't continual observations of a photon(s) reduce the speed of light? Is my reasoning flawed?
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1answer
28 views

Velocity of electrons during transition to different energy

I was watching a documentary of quantum mechanics (this video). They said something about quantum leap, jumping of electrons from one energy state to other. I want to ask how electrons travel though ...