Quantum mechanics describes the microscopic properties of nature in a regime where classical mechanics no longer applies. It explains phenomena such as the wave-particle duality, quantization of energy and the uncertainty principle and is generally used in single body systems. Use the ...

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84 views

Double slit experiment from first principles of QM

I have read many descriptions of electron double slit experiment but I could not find the description from the first principles of quantum mechanics. Most of the descriptions makes comparison with ...
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32 views

Correlation between Relativity and Quantum Mechanics [on hold]

By which theory we can connect Quantum Mechanics and Relativity?
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1answer
40 views

Is quantum indeterministic? [duplicate]

The question might look clear from a viewpoint of a non-physics guy but let me be more specific. Can we say quantum leaps or waves or maybe the universe itself are completely indeterministic or do ...
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21 views

Momentum operator of a particle in an electromagnetic field

In quantum mechanics, to all observables correspond some self-adjoint operators. In the absence of an electromagnetic field the momentum operator is clearly $\vec{P}:=\frac{\hbar}{i}\vec{\nabla}$. ...
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44 views

Is the harmonic oscillator potential unique in having equally spaced discrete energy levels?

I was wondering if the good old quadratic potential was the only potential with equally spaced eigenvalues. Obviously you can construct others, such as a potential that is infinite in some places and ...
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39 views

What is the status of Everett's Thought Equation?

Here is Hugh Everett's PhD Thesis: http://philosophyfaculty.ucsd.edu/faculty/wuthrich/PhilPhys/EverettHugh1957PhDThesis_BarrettComments.pdf On page 9 he says: "We have the task of making ...
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1answer
69 views

Why is optical orbital angular momentum (OAM) called “topological charge”?

The terminology "topological charge" is frequent in lots of research papers related to optical vortex or optical OAM, it is used to represent the optical OAM. Why? How to comprehend it?
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375 views

How can blackbody radition be explained by quantization?

I don't understand why quantization makes a peak on the blackbody radiation curve (so there is no UV catastrophe) and the relationship between that peak and quantization concept. When the blackbody ...
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2answers
591 views

How do electrons interact if one of them had just exited the two slits of the double-slit experiment?

Consider the following experiment: a double-slit set-up for firing electrons one at a time. Let's now add a second electron (orange), which is fired parallel to the first one, but in the opposite ...
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2answers
116 views

Hydrogen atom: potential well and orbit radii

I happened to open up an old solid-state electronics book by Sah, and in it he says: "it is evident that the electron orbit radius is half the well radius at the energy level En" The orbit radius is ...
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66 views

The relationship between angular and linear momentum

Why is orbital angular momentum not 0 when spin and linear momentum are not collinear? Why can it be 0 when spin and linear momentum are parallel? Like in the example of a scalar field at rest ...
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80 views

Blackbody and standing waves

I'm reading articles about black body radiation and why classical mechanics fails to explain it. My question is: Why do EM waves have to be standing wave in a cavity?
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48 views

Is there in quantum physics really a coincidence? [on hold]

Coincidence doesn't make a sense in our universe. Something that hasn't any cause of existence just doesn't exist. Even coincidence what computers calculate is not a real coincidence - they calculate ...
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86 views

On use of Hamiltonians for Helium

The Hamiltonian of helium can be expressed as the sum of two hydrogen Hamiltonians and that of the Coulomb interaction of two electrons. $$\hat H = \hat H_1 + \hat H_2 + \hat H_{1,2}.$$ The wave ...
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53 views

Are universally valid possibilistic theories possible?

This is a spin-off of the following question: Are Thomas Breuer's subjective decoherence and Scott Aaronson's freebits with knightian freedom the same things in essence? Given that Thomas ...
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38 views

1-particle momentum eigenfunction in terms of field operator for real Klein-Gordon field

Suppose $\phi(x)$ is a real Klein-Gordon field, then the single-particle wave function $\psi(x)$ corresponding to a momentum $p$ is given by (QFT, Ryder) $$\psi_p(x)=\langle0|\phi(x)|p\rangle.$$ The ...
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3answers
127 views

The need for a 'particle description' of electrons

Is there any phenomenon where the 'wave description' of the electron's motion is not applicable? The reason for this question is to find out if there are any situations were quantum wave theories ...
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2answers
45 views

Is there any difference between massless Dirac fermions and Weyl fermions?

In graphene we call the low energy excitations around the Dirac point Dirac fermions, which are massless. Is this just by convention or is there any further differences between massless Dirac ...
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1answer
23 views

Slit width for minimum spot size in electron slit diffraction if involving uncertainity principle

I don't believe the following is an accurate description of the physical but a homework problem to help understanding. A beam of electron of energy 0.025 eV moving along x-direction, passes ...
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2answers
106 views

Calculating states of entangled and disentangled qubits

I'm writing a quantum computer simulator (about 8 qubits) and I know most of the basics (i.e. how to calculate the effect of a quantum gate on a qubit). But I have hit a wall. Is it possible, with ...
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2answers
155 views

If atoms have specific energy levels, why do opaque solids absorb all visible light, not just some? [duplicate]

Here's my question: if atoms have well defined energy levels and those differences correspond to the frequencies of light that can be absorbed, how is it that opaque objects absorb all or most visible ...
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1answer
170 views

number of gravitons launched by a proton

The wikipedia article http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gauge_bosons describes how in QM exchanges of gauge bosons carry force, and describes how the graviton may also be a gauge boson. If the observable ...
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1answer
64 views

Spin drift velocity?

I am currently reading this Phys Rev paper by H C Torrey. In this paper, he derives the Bloch equations with an additional diffusion term. He says that the current density is given by $$\mathbf ...
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1answer
274 views

What is crystal field anisotropy or effect ? It forces the magnetic moment to point in particular local direction..

Can you give a basic explanation of what is crystal field anisotropy ? What is the reason to arise ? In spin ice it forces the dipoles to point in the local 111 direction. For partially filled rare ...
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1answer
25 views

Joint-measure of POVM's

I feel disturbed by this question: Suppose $A$ and $B$ are POVM's with respective $\sigma$-algebras $\mathcal{F}_A$ and $\mathcal{F}_B$ and outcome spaces $\Omega_A$ and $\Omega_B$. Then why can't I ...
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2answers
191 views

Pauli's Exclusion Principle

Can someone tell me how Pauli's Exclusion Principle gives stability to matter? I know two electrons cannot occupy the same energy state so that is why we cannot squeeze bulk matter after a limit and ...
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77 views

Convention in physics for [],{} and operators (QM)

I got a little mixed up with the convention in physics. Usually a hat means an operator. For a given electron-ion Hamiltonian $\hat{H}_{e-n}$, what are the difference between these: 1) ...
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1answer
136 views

Transmission + Reflection coefficients >1 For Potencial Barrier with Negative Complex Part Contradicts Paper

I am studying reflection and transmission coefficients for a barrier consisting of a a step potencial defined by: $$V(x):=\begin{cases}0&{\rm if}\,|x|>a/2 \\ V_0+iW_0 & {\rm ...
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1answer
82 views

NMR rotating frame

I'm reading about a linearly polarized field (in the context of NMR). The field is given by $$ {\bf H_{lin}}=2H_1({\bf i}cos(\omega_zt)).$$ This can be created by having a pulse field plus its ...
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2answers
61 views

Optical absorption in a semiconductor for $E<E_g$ [duplicate]

Quoting from Solid State Electronic Devices (by Ben G. Streetman and Sanjay Banerjee): A photon with energy less than $E_g$ is unable to excite an electron from the valence band to the ...
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0answers
58 views

What math do I want to focus on for 1) quantum computing and 2) quantum physics? [on hold]

What math do I want to focus on for 1) quantum computing and 2) quantum physics? I am interested in studying quantum computing and the Higgs Boson (quantum physics?) and ultimately working in some ...
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4answers
3k views

Amplitude of an electromagnetic wave containing a single photon

Given a light pulse in vacuum containing a single photon with an energy $E=h\nu$, what is the peak value of the electric / magnetic field?
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327 views

Some doubts about photons

I am reading Berkeley Physics Course vol. 4 (Quantum Mechanics) , chapter 4 (photons). (1) Section 46: book says: consider a typical photon emitted by the source. It can be regarded as a a wave ...
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1answer
41 views

How and under what principle are measurements made at quantum level? [on hold]

There's a lot of news about amazing quantum phenomena, but even without the expert knowledge I would still like to know how it is done and think about the possibility of errors in measurements. How, ...
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1answer
77 views

Significance of 'chiral' form for a quibit?

Say I have a qubit with probability amplitude divided evenly among $|0\rangle$ and $|1\rangle$ $$\frac{1}{\sqrt 2}|0\rangle + \frac{1}{\sqrt 2}|1\rangle$$ So it seems that we have a, loosely ...
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278 views

How fat is Feynman’s photon?

According to my calculations, it is a lot skinnier than Airy’s photon, but still a whole lot fatter than a straight line. So, how does a photon get from point A to Point B? The ray optics ...
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62 views

How do we know that photon entanglement isn't the result of the photons's states being predetermined?

I know there is evidence that it is not predetermined and I tried reading articles on it but most of them either don't explain the intuition behind the experiment or they speak in a foreign language ...
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440 views

Entropy increase vs Conservation of information (QM)

Unitarity of quantum mechanics prohibits information destruction. On the other hand, the second law of thermodynamics claims entropy to be increasing. If entropy is to be thought of as a measure of ...
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243 views

Quantum Entanglement - an illusion based on a wrong assumption?

Almost all resources I've read about Quantum Entanglement speak about how 'amazing' it is that two entangled particles are bound over any distance, and that the state of one particle determines the ...
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1answer
109 views

How to tell whether photons are entangled?

Suppose you have some sort of a "black box" system - you know nothing of its inner workings. The system has two outputs, let's call them A and B, and it occasionally emits photons - one photon from ...
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68 views

Making an Incomplete Set of Observables Complete

In quantum mechanics, it seems a standard procedure that if you have an incomplete set of observables, then one can make this set complete by adding more commuting observables until the set becomes ...
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32 views

Quantum machanics powering by -2? [on hold]

I watch a youtube video on quantum mechanics not so long ago and a scientist said something a long the lines of "In quantum mechanics we power by -2 (he might of said -1 I'm not sure) I know that's it ...
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1answer
245 views

Coercivity of a ferromagnetic material?

I understand that coercivity is the field/force required to demagnetize/magnetize a ferromagnetic material. What if we had two opposite magnetic fields of different strengths values H acting on the ...
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2answers
61 views

Is a superposition of (anti)symmetric states (anti)symmetric?

Let's say we have the following wavefunction of two identical particles, $A$ and $B$: $$\frac{1}{2}[(\chi(A)\psi(B)\pm\psi(A)\chi(B))+(\phi(A)\eta(B)\pm\eta(A)\phi(B))]$$ Is this properly ...
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4answers
835 views

How is the hamiltonian a hermitian operator?

My book about quantum mechanics states that the hamiltonian, defined as $H=i\hbar\frac{\partial}{\partial t}$ is a hermitian operator. But i don't really see how I have to interpret this. First of ...
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1answer
468 views

Uncertainty Principle Intuition

So, as your usual physics undergrad, I read Griffiths's derivation of the general uncertainty principle. I understood it but there was no physical intuition given behind it in the book. It was ...
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28 views

Quantum particle in one dimension [closed]

I'm trying to solve the following problem: Consider a particle in one dimension with potential: \begin{equation} V(x)=\frac{1}{2}m\omega^2x^2\mathbf{1}-gx\boldsymbol\sigma_3, \end{equation} ...
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214 views

Some small questions about quantum spin and rotations

I'm studying about quantum-spin (in a syllabus about non-relativistic quantum-mechanics though), but I have some trouble understanding everything. So I would like to ask some small questions, which ...
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110 views

When do we see particles to be in a superposition of energy states?

I have two doubts: Exactly when does this happen? and If we are in a superposition of states (lets say E1 and E2) and the particle absorbs a photon, what will happen? If E3-E1 = hf, will it go to E3? ...