Quantum mechanics describes the microscopic properties of nature in a regime where classical mechanics no longer applies. It explains phenomena such as the wave-particle duality, quantization of energy and the uncertainty principle and is generally used in single body systems. Use the ...

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49
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5answers
5k views

Which is more fundamental, Fields or Particles?

I hope that I am using appropriate terminology. My confusion about quantum theory (beyond my obvious unfamiliarity with its terminology) is basically twofold: I lack an adequate understanding of ...
2
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1answer
221 views

How to explain in simple terms why Entanglement is more than just complicated hidden variables

I haven't taken a graduate level physics course on quantum mechanics so I get lost in the strange looking equasions. It's hard for me too see in any of the explanations of how quantum computers and ...
1
vote
1answer
87 views

Trying to measure travel time of photons in a double slit experiment

So far I'm only tasting the quantum mechanics. Haven't gone very deep into the mathematics of it yet. I read about the double slit experiment, and the weird consequences of it: if you put a detector ...
2
votes
1answer
145 views

From where randomness comes from and why it exists? [closed]

I recently began to study statistics and probability and I have two questions: Where does randomness come from? What is the source of randomness? Why does the randomness exist? Is it possible to ...
1
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1answer
50 views

Time dependency of the phase of a single photon

I am wondering if a wave packet of a single photon in the time domaine $$ \psi(t)=|\psi(t)|\; \text e^{\text i \varphi(t)} $$ can have a different $t$ dependence in phase than the simple phase ...
0
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0answers
104 views

Quantum mechanics and probability

I've done an intro course on QM and I'm now hoping to understand exactly how to use probability theory rigorously in solving problems. My question is: How do I do the same thing, or the closest thing ...
0
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2answers
54 views

Dual particle-wave behavior

If electrons and photons, and possibly more particles, exhibit dual character, why don't physicists create a new classification for them? Why describe them as both waves and particles. Why not rather ...
0
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2answers
56 views

Modeling Quantum Aspects with Probability

This is a question I've had a while about quantum theory. Many times when I look at books and equations about this subject matter I see that the use many concepts in probability. (Correct me if Im ...
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3answers
439 views

The boundary for quantum mechanical behavior and classical mechanical behavior

To what size and how does "quantum weirdness" such as entanglement and superposition stop applying to larger objects (mere unions of these quantum particles). How do these macro objects that behave as ...
0
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1answer
77 views

What are some publications which continue Schrödinger's “What is life?” discussion?

I'm looking for modern publications on the physical nature of life in which the primary reference is to the discussion started by Schrödinger in 1944 in his book "What is life". For example, ...
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2answers
91 views

What is the energy operator and from where do we get it?

I am trying to learn Quantum mechanics from MIT OCW Videos about quantum mechanics. I have reached the 5th lecture. Please help me in understanding this: In the middle (At 32:08), the professor wrote ...
1
vote
1answer
235 views

How can one calculate the phase difference between two quantum harmonic oscillator (Hermite-Gauss) states?

The analytic solutions of a quantum harmonic oscillator are given by Hermite-Gauss states, which differ in the order $n$ of the Hermite polynomials. If two such states are plotted, there will be a ...
4
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0answers
56 views

How to distinguish Bose glass and superfluid phases in a harmonic trap?

In mean-field study of Bose-Hubbard model in an optical lattice, what parameter can be calculated to distinguish Bose glass and superfluid in a harmonic trap?
5
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1answer
247 views

What does the Higgs boson have to do with the uncertainty principle and quantum oscillations?

I was looking in New Scientist the other day when I saw something to do with the Higgs boson, energy levels, entropy, space/time, quantum oscillations and many other things. It was in a feature to do ...
0
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1answer
125 views

Quantum Mechanics and Entanglement

I'm hearing a guy ( Tom Cassidy ), which supposedly has a master in physics, saying that what we expect in a physical experiment ( for example, observing some particle ) can actually interefere with ...
1
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2answers
558 views

What is the cut-off for quantum superposition?

Is there an explanation as to how macro objects aren't in superposition? At what size do objects stop being in a state of superposition?
4
votes
3answers
1k views

Quantum Mechanics or Classical Mechanics? [closed]

I'm just a student of grade 11 but, I was interested in knowing about Physics much deeper. In order to start my interest in Physics, I watched this video of Quantum Physics NOVA : Quantum ...
1
vote
1answer
524 views

Sign of the wave function in orbital representation?

I have some fog in my head and a rather simple question for you: When the sign of the wave function is representated on orbitals, what is this sign? I mean is it the sign of the real part of the ...
3
votes
1answer
85 views

Linearity of the time evolution operator for the reduced density matrix of an entangled state

Suppose to have a system $S$ immersed in an enviroment; the pure states are elements of $H_S \otimes H_E$, where $H_S$ is the hilbert space of the system and $H_E$ is the hilbert space of the ...
1
vote
1answer
97 views

I am trying to calculate how $<r>$ in the hydrogen atom evolves with time

I am working on the Hydrogen atom and I was trying to calculate $\frac{d<r>}{dt}$ using $$\frac{d<r>}{dt} = \frac{i}{\hbar} <[\hat{H} , \hat{r}]>.$$ Here $r = \sqrt(x^2 + y^2 + z^2)$ ...
2
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1answer
256 views

Infinite-dimensional Hilbert spaces in physical systems

Can anyone give an example of when infinite-dimensional Hilbert spaces are required to describe a physical system? The standard answer to this question is yes, and I'm sure some of you will be quick ...
-2
votes
2answers
121 views

Energy carried by photon not conserved?

In an imaginary frame of reference traveling with a photon, the length of the path traveled is 0. If the length of the path is 0, isn't it similar to say that the photon is either at the source or at ...
2
votes
4answers
468 views

Has a photon or electron ever been observed in a state of superposition?

Has subatomic particles ever been seen in a state of superposition or do we just detect information like qubits about the state of the particle? So is actual matter in superposition or is it just ...
3
votes
1answer
249 views

Two-level system with spontaneous emission

I have been stuck with this elementary problem of two-level system including spontaneous decay. After solving by standard procedure the following pair of equations, when I plot the expressions of the ...
15
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1answer
645 views

Why is Copenhagen Interpretation the most used & popular interpretation of quantum mechanics? [closed]

It is well known that there are many interpretations of quantum mechanics. I'm wondering if there is a specific reason why the Copenhagen interpretation is the most popular. Why is it that the ...
4
votes
1answer
390 views

Why is string theory a two dimensional quantum (conformal) field theory on its worldsheet?

In string theory, we quantize the two dimensional field theory on the string's worldsheet. I have a question about this kind of quantization of string theory: did we have similar theory for point-like ...
6
votes
1answer
260 views

Poles for a particle scattered in a delta potential

I am working on problem a professor gave me to get an idea for the research he does, and have hit a point where I'm having a difficult time seeing where I need to go from where I'm at. I would also ...
1
vote
1answer
100 views

How is a photon/particle measured when passing through one of the slits of the Double Slit Experiment?

It is stated in many popular science videos that one of the reasons that quantum mechanics is so wacky is that if you measure which slit the photon/particle went through on the way, then you no longer ...
3
votes
2answers
183 views

Why do some bound states disappear in a discontinuous way?

Generally, we have the picture that as the parameter (say, the depth of a trap) of a system varies, the bound state gets more and more extended and disappears eventually at some critical parameter ...
1
vote
3answers
180 views

Can the distance over time of an electron between two measurements be higher than the speed of light?

So measure an electron, take down it's position $p$. Then measure the electron a second time and take down it's new position $p'$. Note the time between measurements, $t$. What does physics say about ...
2
votes
3answers
273 views

Does processing for a quantum computer take place in other universes?

Apologies in advance if my question seems misinformed. I am a software developer, and neither quantum mechanics nor physics are my specialties. From ...
0
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1answer
151 views

Problem in Grandfather paradox

I am very confused about a paradox and a recent research on Quantum particles. I have read an article which states that time travel is possible for quantum particles. If it is possible then why does ...
8
votes
2answers
268 views

Deriving the expectation of $[\hat X,\hat H]$

For a free particle of mass $m$, with Hamiltonian $$\hat{H} = \frac {\hat{P}^2} {2m},$$ where $$\hat{P} = -i \hbar \frac{\partial} {\partial x}.$$ The commutative relation is given by $$[\hat{X}, ...
1
vote
1answer
746 views

Matrix elements of the operator $\hat{x} \hat{p}$ in position and momentum basis

I want to calculate the matrix elements of the operator $\hat{x} \hat{p}$ in momentum and position basis, that is the two quantities ($p,q$ - momenta, $x,y$ - positions): $$\langle p|\hat{x} ...
1
vote
1answer
426 views

Any simple reason why Helium in the ground state is diamagnetic?

I know the electrons are in the spin singlet state, and the spatial part of the wave function is an S-state. But that is not sufficient for it to be diamagnetic.
4
votes
1answer
212 views

Why must these Spinors be normalized?

I have just begun studying spin and there are two spinors mentioned: The main spinor $\chi $ and the spin-up spin down spinors (eigenspinors) $\chi_+ ,\chi_- $. I learned that the main spinor is a ...
3
votes
2answers
408 views

Pauli's Exclusion Principle

Can someone tell me how Pauli's Exclusion Principle gives stability to matter? I know two electrons cannot occupy the same energy state so that is why we cannot squeeze bulk matter after a limit and ...
0
votes
0answers
84 views

How classical chaos can be described quantum mechanically?

How can we describe the chaotic properties of classical systems using quantum mechanics when the Schrodinger equation that describes quantum dynamics is linear? How can we use quantum mechanics that ...
5
votes
1answer
234 views

What is the dominant interaction between two neighboring neutrons?

Suppose they are held 10 nm apart. What is the dominant interaction between them? The magnetic dipole interaction or something else?
2
votes
2answers
2k views

Angular momentum for 3D harmonic oscillator in two different bases

I know that the energy eigenstates of the 3D quantum harmonic oscillator can be characterized by three quantum numbers: $$ | n_1,n_2,n_3\rangle$$ or, if solved in the spherical coordinate system: ...
3
votes
1answer
256 views

Schrodinger basis kets with Time-dependent Hamiltonian

I was reading through the proof of the Adiabatic Theorem (in Sakurai) and I realised I'm not quite sure how Schrodinger Basis kets behave when we have a time-dependent Hamiltonian. I know that with a ...
5
votes
1answer
288 views

What interaction is responsible for the 21 cm Hydrogen line transition?

The 21 cm Hydrogen line is from the transition between the hyperfine levels of the ground state of the hydrogen atom. So, what interaction is coupling the hyperfine levels? I suspect that it is not ...
0
votes
2answers
159 views

Determine $p_x$ from $[x,p_x]=i\hbar $ [closed]

With $[x,p_x]=i\hbar $, how to determine the form of the operator $p_x$?
1
vote
3answers
96 views

Why diaphragm in diffraction experiment using electrons is quantum object?

In the book Quantum Mechanics - Volume 1 written by Albert Messiah, page no. 142-143, author says: ...But the diaphragm is a quantum object, just like the electron. Its momentum is not defined to ...
1
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0answers
73 views

Can the new results (about photonic time travel) make quantum computers feasible?

New results published about photonic time travel, reference here make quantum computers a reality in the near future? These results seem to indicate that there can be qubits that can exhibit nonlinear ...
2
votes
1answer
549 views

Does the Bohr van Leeuwen Theorem also apply to ferromagnetism?

I know that the Bohr-van Leeuwen theorem shows that there could be not consistent pure classical explanation of dia- and paramagnetism. Does the same theorem also rule out a consistent classical ...
1
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0answers
138 views

CPT symmetries for a free Klein-Gordon equation and in minimal coupling

I'm studying for an exam on relativistic quantum mechanics and one of the issues to prepare is about symmetries of Klein-Gordon equation concerning $C$, $P$, $T$ transformations for a free field, and ...
23
votes
4answers
2k views

Density matrix formalism

The density matrix $\hat{\rho}$ is often introduced in textbooks as a mathematical convenience that allows us to describe quantum systems in which there is some level of missing information. ...
3
votes
1answer
149 views

Divergent solution in time-dependent Schrödinger equation

if I transform the time-dependent Schrödinger equation without a potential I get: $$ - \hbar \omega \psi(\omega,x) = \frac{- \hbar^2}{2m} \frac{\partial^2 \psi(\omega,x)}{\partial x^2}$$ The ...
0
votes
1answer
260 views

Finite potential well, parity of solutions

I'm working through some problems for a QM exam and I've realised I don't really understand the concept of parity of solutions. I'm looking at a simple finite potential well problem: $$V(x)=0, \quad ...