Quantum mechanics describes the microscopic properties of nature in a regime where classical mechanics no longer applies. It explains phenomena such as the wave-particle duality, quantization of energy and the uncertainty principle and is generally used in single body systems. Use the ...

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What are relativistic and radiative effects (in quantum simulation)?

I'm reading about Quantum Monte Carlo, and I see that some people are trying to calculate hydrogen and helium energies as accurately as possible. QMC with Green's function or Diffusion QMC seem to be ...
2
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2answers
277 views

Physical meaning of some operators formed by $|Q\rangle \langle Q|$

In Dirac's formulation of quantum mechanics, Suppose that $q$ represents position observable. About $|q\rangle \langle q|$: what does this operator mean? I do get that it results in an operator, but ...
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2answers
2k views

Barrier in an infinite double well

I am stuck on a QM homework problem. The setup is this: (To be clear, the potential in the left and rightmost regions is $0$ while the potential in the center region is $V_0$, and the wavefunction ...
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1answer
508 views

State normalization in Dirac's formulation of quantum mechanics

Let us divide the time $T$ into $N$ segments each lasting $δt = T/N$. Then we write $\langle q_F | e^{−iHT} |q_I \rangle = \langle q_F | e^{−iHδt} e^{−iHδt} . . . e^{−iHδt} |q_I \rangle $ Our ...
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1answer
986 views

Schrödinger equation with complex potential

In 1 dimension what is the solution of the Schrödinger equation with potential $$ V(x) = V_r + i V_i $$ Potentials are constant.
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1answer
143 views

Why is amplitude of a wavefunction to propagate from $q$ to $q'$ governed by $e^{-\frac{i}{\hbar}HT}$ unitary operator?

In the textbook Quantum Field Theory by A. Zee, it says: In quantum mechanics, the amplitude to propagate from a point $q_i$ to a point $q_f$ in time $T$ is governed by the unitary operator ...
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2answers
3k views

What math is needed to understand the Schrödinger equation?

If I now see the Schrödinger equation, I just see a bunch of weird symbols, but I want to know what it actually means. So I'm taking a course of Linear Algebra and I'm planning on starting with PDE's ...
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4answers
942 views

Entangled electron-positron pair

Usually when we talk about entanglement, we mean entangled spin states (of electrons) or polarizations (of photons). My questions are: Does pair production guarantee the product electron and ...
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1answer
210 views

Are Born-Oppenheimer energies analytic functions of nuclear positions?

I am looking for references to bibliography that explores the smoothness and analyticity of eigenvalues and eigenfunctions (and matrix elements in general) of a hamiltonian that depends on some ...
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2answers
224 views

Measurement of the energy of an atom using a cold substance

An atom was prepared in a superposition of ground state and excited states.I propose to measure the state by coupling the system to a cold enough substance. By cold enough I mean $$kT\ll E_1,$$ where ...
3
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1answer
216 views

How quantum field transforms in case of some particular spin

Except when a particle is spin-0, field of all particles transforms when frame of reference is changed, and this defines what spin is. The question is, specifically how does the quantum field ...
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2answers
393 views

How to write Schrodinger equation when a particle with some spin quantity and orbital angular momentum

Quantum mechanics: Suppose that there is a particle with orbital angular momentum $|L|$. But the particle also has spin quantity $|S|$. The question is, how do I reflect this into Schrodinger ...
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1answer
288 views

An equation that describes massless spin-1 particle

Proca action/equation describes massive spin-1 particle, but I was unable to find an equation that describes massless spin-1 particle. Can anyone tell me what the name of this equation is?
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4answers
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What is the meaning of uncertainty in Heisenberg's uncertainty principle?

The Heisenberg's uncertainty principle states the following: $$\Delta p \cdot \Delta x \ge \frac{h}{4\pi}.$$ While studying for my high school physics exams, I fooled myself into believing that I ...
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3answers
2k views

Why do we use Hermitian operators in QM?

Position, momentum, energy and other observables yield real-valued measurements. The Hilbert-space formalism accounts for this physical fact by associating observables with Hermitian ('self-adjoint') ...
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4answers
603 views

Does measuring destroy entanglement

Before measuring a quantum particle(photon) it exists in a superposition state, once we observe(measure) it, it settles in one of the possible states(destroying superposition). For entangled ...
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0answers
65 views

fiber optic second order PMD as an operator on the tensor product Hilbert space

Second order polarization mode dispersion (SOPMD) is a coupling mechanism between polarization and frequency. Take our photon to be the following tensor product: $\psi = \int \gamma_{\omega} | ...
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4answers
2k views

Why would Klein-Gordon describe spin-0 scalar field while Dirac describe spin-1/2?

The derivation of both Klein-Gordon equation and Dirac equation is due the need of quantum mechanics (or to say more correctly, quantum field theory) to adhere to special relativity. However, excpet ...
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1answer
204 views

Something I don't understand in Quantum Mechanics

I've just started on QM and I'm puzzled with a lot of new ideas in it. 1.On a recent lecture I've attended, there is an equation says: $\langle q'|\sum q|q\rangle \langle q|q' \rangle =\sum q ...
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1answer
101 views

Other ways of checking whether particular system result in non-locality

In quantum mechanics, when hamiltonian $H$ is constrained ($H = \sqrt{m^2 - \hbar^2 \nabla^2} $) so that it would produce simple "relativistic" model of quantum mechanics, we can show that it results ...
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0answers
98 views

decoherence free subspace of a single photon

Take the state vector for a single photon as $\psi = \int \gamma_{\omega} | \omega \rangle \otimes (\alpha |H \rangle + \beta | V \rangle )d \omega$ $H, V, \omega$ are the horizontal polarization, ...
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5answers
957 views

Derivation of Schrodinger equation for a system with position dependent effective mass

How to derive the Schrodinger equation for a system with position dependent effective mass? For example, I encountered this equation when I first studied semiconductor hetero-structures. All the books ...
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1answer
2k views

Normalizable wave functions?

How can I test whether a wave function is normalizable? If you apply an operator to a wave function, sometimes the result will not be normalizable. But how can I find these wave functions that do not ...
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1answer
342 views

Matrix and exponential term problem

We know the Schrodinger equation for free Hamiltonian is : $$ i\hbar\frac{\partial\psi}{\partial t} = H_f \psi $$ the wave function could be written as $$ \psi(x,t)=\hat{S}(t) \psi(x,0) $$ $$ ...
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1answer
232 views

On the double slit experiment with 4 slits

I'm not a physicist nor a science savvy person, but I was wondering if this experiment was ever performed in a simultaneous fashion on screens with fixed references(marks) and firing different ...
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2answers
182 views

Diffusion of probability amplitudes

Let's say I have a probability amplitude $\psi:\Sigma\rightarrow\mathbb{C}$ for some domain $\Sigma$ (so, $\psi$ satisfies $\int_\Sigma |\psi|^2=1$). Is there a way to use $\psi$ as initial ...
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4answers
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Intuitive explanation of why momentum is the Fourier transform variable of position?

Does anyone have a (semi-)intuitive explanation of why momentum is the Fourier transform variable of position? (By semi-intuitive I mean, I already have intuition on Fourier transform between ...
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2answers
227 views

$\nabla$ and non-locality in simple relativistic model of quantum mechanics

In Wavefunction in quantum mechanics and locality, wavefunction is constrained by $H = \sqrt{m^2 - \hbar^2 \nabla^2} $, and taylor-expanding $H$ results in: $$ H = \dots = m\sqrt{1 - \hbar^2/m^2 ...
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1answer
168 views

Problem in Hamiltonian

I need to elaborate the equation ,and need to know what is the physical significance and how matrices will manipulate in the equation $$ \hat{H} = (\hat{\tau_3}+i\hat{\tau_2})\frac{\hat{p}^2}{2m_0}+ ...
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286 views

Newton's gravitational constant $G$, the reduced Planck constant $\hbar$, the speed of light $c$: the Dream Team of moderators?

The three great constants of Nature are well known: the speed of light $c$ (special relativity), the reduced Planck constant $\hbar$ (quantum mechanics), Newton's ...
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3answers
744 views

Hawking radiation and reversibility

It's often said that, as long as the information that fell into a black hole comes out eventually in the Hawking radiation (by whatever means), pure states remain pure rather than evolving into mixed ...
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3answers
1k views

Classical vs qubits: Superposition

Since a quantum information lecture today I have been wondering what does it really mean for a state to be in superposition? Is this something that is answerable? This is what we learnt (or what I ...
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1answer
577 views

Solution to Klein-Gordon equation always valid?

We know that there is a relativistic version of Schrodinger equation called Klein-Gordon equation. However, it has some problems and due to these problems, there is Dirac equation that handles these ...
3
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1answer
349 views

Wavefunction in quantum mechanics and locality

Every wavefunction of a form $\Psi(x)$ can be described as a superposition of multiple free particle solutions. We can see the following Fourier transform: $$ \psi(x) = \int e^{ik\cdot x} \psi(k) dk ...
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1answer
274 views

Complete set and Klein-Gordon equation

In http://www.physics.ucdavis.edu/~cheng/teaching/230A-s07/rqm2_rev.pdf, it says that when there is some external potential, the Klein-Gordon equation is altered, and it says the following: The ...
3
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1answer
255 views

Question on Sakurai's treatment of the Harmonic Oscillator:

In Section 2.3 of the second edition of Modern Quantum Mechanics (which discusses the harmonic oscillator), Sakurai derives the relation $$Na\left|n\right> = (n-1)a\left|n\right>,$$ and states ...
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3answers
216 views

What is predicted to happen for electron beams in the Stern-Gerlach experiment?

The Stern–Gerlach experiment has been carried out for silver and hydrogen atoms, with the result that the beams are deflected discretely rather than continuously by an inhomogenous magnetic field. ...
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3answers
715 views

Creation of particle anti-particle pairs

I was reading some QFT notes and there is one point that I don't understand, they are justifying why we need QFT saying that the number of particles is not preserved once we consider special ...
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2answers
794 views

Electron Incident On A Finite Potential Barrier

This is problem 2.8.3 from Miller's Quantum Mechanics For Scientists And Engineers. I'm getting stuck when I try to figure out the wave equation on the right-hand side of the barrier. The original ...
2
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1answer
444 views

Explanation of equation that shows a failed approach to relativize Schrodinger equation

I'm reading the Wikipedia page for the Dirac equation: $\rho=\phi^*\phi\,$ ...... $J = -\frac{i\hbar}{2m}(\phi^*\nabla\phi - \phi\nabla\phi^*)$ with the conservation of probability ...
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4answers
1k views

Reason for the discreteness arising in quantum mechanics?

What is the most essential reason that actually leads to the quantization. I am reading the book on quantum mechanics by Griffiths. The quanta in the infinite potential well for e.g. arise due to the ...
0
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1answer
242 views

Work done by introducing a spin in supersposition into a Magnetic Field

A spin is created in a superposition of up and down states. A magnet is moved very slowly, towards the spin. What is the work done by the magnet. It may be helpful to imagine that the magnet is ...
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2answers
147 views

Similarity of probability amplitude functions

Let's say I have two probability amplitude functions given by $\psi_1$ and $\psi_2$. That is, $\psi_i:\Sigma\rightarrow\mathbb{C}$ for some domain $\Sigma$ with $\int_\Sigma|\psi_i|^2=1$ for ...
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1answer
200 views

Books to study quantum thermodynamics and quantum decoherence [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Book recommendations My friend is having a hard time finding books to self-study quantum thermodynamics and quantum decoherence. (search on amaxon would bring almost no ...
2
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3answers
331 views

Schrödinger and thermodynamics

I heard that Schrödinger pointed out that (classical/statistical) thermodynamics is impaired by logical inconsistencies and conceptual ambiguities. I am not sure why he said this and what he is ...
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6answers
3k views

Linear Algebra for Quantum Physics

A week ago I asked people on this forum what mathematical background was needed for understanding Quantum Physics, and most of you mentioned Linear Algebra, so I decided to conduct a self-study of ...
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262 views

What is the 'quantum-developed' or 'relativistic-developed' equation of the electrostatic force?

Quantum electrodynamics (QED) is the relativistic quantum field theory of electrodynamics that is the first theory where full agreement between quantum mechanics, special relativity and ...
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166 views

Would synchronized dancing be a good way to describe entangled atoms to a laymen?

I was talking my professor about entanglement swapping between light and matter and it is briefly described here: You start out with a crystal capable of doing parametric down conversion of incoming ...
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QND, CSCO, decoherence and Large N limits

While trying to actually understand the difference between QND and CSCO, I went and found the relevant reference doc, Quantum nondemolition measurements: The route from toys to tools. The key example ...
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1answer
224 views

Will quantum computers ever work? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Why do some physicists believe that scalable quantum computing is possible? The idea of a quantum computer is that a quantum system can be in a Quantum Superposition of ...