Quantum mechanics describes the microscopic properties of nature in a regime where classical mechanics no longer applies. It explains phenomena such as the wave-particle duality, quantization of energy and the uncertainty principle and is generally used in single body systems. Use the ...

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Can the laws of classical mechanics be derived from quantum mechanics? [duplicate]

Can classical mechanics be derived from quantum mechanics as the same way thermodynamics derived from statistical mechanics?
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213 views

Is there any quantum analogs of three body problem?

IS there any quantum analogy where a three state (or three body) system shows chaotic dynamics as three body problem in classical mechanics?
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180 views

Non-locality and Bell's theory

Non-Locality – (just ) one more question? I have read comments that Bell’s theory proves quantum mechanics is non-local, and also comments that it does not. I have read a comment by a very eminent ...
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518 views

What is the preferred basis objection to the many-worlds interpretation of quantum mechanics?

I've seen the preferred basis problem referred to in many places, but have not seen a clear explanation of what the problem is. For example, this question asks whether the problem has been solved, but ...
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301 views

Many-worlds interpretation vs 'just' randomness?

I have this question about MWI I always wanted to ask but never dared to! It could be that I just don't know enough physics to understand the answer, or the question! Anyway, here goes: What is it ...
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The probability of finding the electron in the H-atom

In the book Arthur Beiser - Concepts of modern physics [page 213] author separates the variables in the polar Schrödinger equation assuming: $$\psi_{nlm}=R(r)\Phi(\phi)\Theta(\theta)$$ then there a ...
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265 views

Distinction between Larmor frequency and Rabi frequency

Wikipedia said "In the context of a nuclear magnetic resonance experiment, the Rabi frequency is the nutation frequency of a sample's net nuclear magnetization vector about a radiofrequency field. ...
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248 views

Classically efficient universal quantum computation (P=BQP) with magic and bound states

$\text P$ vs $\text {BQP}$ is an open question. That is, "can systems which require a polynomial number of qubits in the size of an input be described with only a polynomial number of bits?" If the ...
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184 views

Special relativity and quantum mechanics

I know how the Dirac's equation about the relativistic quantum mechanics works. Can anyone tell me how can one combine special relativity and quantum mechanics as a whole - special relativity is valid ...
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190 views

localization of wave or particles

Nonlinear field theories contain a large number of localized solutions. I have found this text in a article. What I don't understand is "what is localized?". Is it refer defining position of a ...
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466 views

Heisenberg picture of QM as a result of Hamilton formalism

Consider the formula for the total time-derivative of a physical value in Poisson's formalism: $$\tag{1} \frac{dA}{dt} = -\{H, A\}_{P.B.} + \frac{\partial A}{\partial t}, $$ where $\{A, B\}_{P.B.}$ is ...
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187 views

Reason for decoherence time's dependence on variables?

Zurek 2001 is a review article on decoherence in quantum mechanics. Equation 5.36 on p. 24 gives an estimate of the decoherence time, which I'll paraphrase as follows: $ \frac{t_D}{t_R} = ...
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Resource for nonphysicists about QM/GR incompatibility [duplicate]

I don't know how to explain the issues at hand in a way that nonphysicists are certain to understand. Can anyone point me to some resource (book, video, it doesn't really matter) that will help me?
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Why do electrons not bump into impurities in a superconductor?

Just a simple question. Why is it, that when a material becomes superconducting, and by that gets zero resistivity, the electrons don't hit impurities in the material? For the material to have zero ...
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158 views

Has the Double-Slit Quantum Eraser Experiment ever been tried on a large scale?

I was just reading about quantum entanglement and the example was the Double-Slit Quantum Eraser Experiment. Then this was used as a basis for saying that particles might be half a universe apart and ...
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144 views

What are some examples of infinite state quantum mechanical systems that do not involve free particles?

That is, the quanta are in bound states where there are least upper bounds and greatest lower bounds to their energy states but there are at least a countably infinite many energy levels they can ...
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425 views

Quantization of Electron Spin

Why is electron spin quantized? I've seen the derivation for the Hydrogen atom's energy levels, but my professor jumped to electrons having spin 1/2 or -1/2 as experimental. Why do electrons obey the ...
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With what probability does nuclear fusion occur at energies far below the Coulomb barrier?

Even at the core of the sun, the temperature of $\sim 10^7$ K only results in $kT\sim1$ keV, which is about a thousand times less than the electrical potential energy of $\sim1$ MeV needed in order to ...
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61 views

What happens when an ion hits an electron?

For example: $Xe^{+}+e^{-} \rightarrow Xe + \mbox{energy}$ Assuming that the electron has a kinetic energy $\neq 0$. Is the released energy a photon or heat?
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184 views

Equal time displacement correlation functions and their physical interpretation?

Displacement correlation functions in question are within harmonic approximation and are derived for example in: A. Maradudin, Dynamical properties of solids 1, 1 (1974). Maradudin says about the ...
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180 views

Resultant curvature tensor from the Casimir Effect

I've often seen the Casimir effect cited as a source of negative energy/exotic matter with regards to ideas like the Alcubierre drive. The articles then go on to note that the energy required by the ...
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166 views

What conserved quantities are in 1D free quantum particle

From Laundau & Lifshitz "Quantum Mechanics": If there are two conserved physical quantities $f$ and $g$ whose operators do not commute, then the energy levels of the system are in general ...
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354 views

Magnetic moment precession around magnetic field

I have a question regarding the magnetic moment of an atom. If you just have one atom, and you apply an external magnetic field in lets say the z-direction. Then the magnetic moment will precess ...
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673 views

State collapse in the Heisenberg picture

I've been studying quantum mechanics and quantum field theory for a few years now and one question continues to bother me. The Schrödinger picture allows for an evolving state, which evolves through ...
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210 views

A Energy Eigenbasis for the Potential Step

We should all fondly remember this basic undergraduate problem: A quantum particle is incident (from the left) upon a potential barrier of height V and width L. Compute the transmission and ...
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107 views

Difference between photo electron spectrum and photoelectron angular distribution

I am trying to learn the Photoelectron velocity map imaging. While I was going through the article "Chem. Soc. Rev., 2009,38,2169-2177", it is said that the "photoelectron spectrum reflects the energy ...
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Graphene's Tight Binding Hamiltonian

Graphene has two atoms in its primitive unit cell. This makes it intuitive to see that the tight binding Hamiltonian can be constructed as a $ 2 \times 2 $ matrix $H$ acting on a spinor $S$ that ...
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Is the symmetrisation postulate unnecessary according to Landau Lifshitz?

The symmetrisation postulate is known for stating that, in nature, particles have either completely symmetric or completely antisymmetric wave functions. According to these postulate, these states are ...
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BEC in a rotating disc

Goodmorning everybody, I have to run a numerical simulation of a Bose-Einstein condensate on a rotating disc. Now, my problem is that I became suspicious about the equation I'm using, since the final ...
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593 views

Why does nonlinearity in quantum mechanics lead to superluminal signaling?

I recently came across two nice papers on the foundations of quantum mechancis, Aaronson 2004 and Hardy 2001. Aaronson makes the statement, which was new to me, that nonlinearity in QM leads to ...
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190 views

States versus ensembles in quantum mechanics

In quantum mechanics, we talk about (1) vectors, (2) states, and (3) ensembles (e.g., a beam in a particle accelerator). Suppose we want to translate this into mathematical definitions. If I'd never ...
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Quantum tunelling problem - got a weird imaginary ratio in the end

1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data Beam of electrons with energy $10eV$ hits the potential step ($8eV$ high and $0.5nm$ wide). How much of the current is transmitted? ...
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879 views

How to solve bound states of 2D finite rectangular square well?

I want to solve bound states (in fact only base state is needed) of time-independent Schrodinger equation with a 2D finite rectangular square well \begin{equation}V(x,y)=\cases{0,&$ |x|\le a ...
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463 views

Is it possible for dark matter to somehow turn into regular matter?

Is it possible for dark matter to create the regular matter that we, the stars, and the galaxies are made of? The reason I'm asking this is because I have a hard time imagining how something can ...
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Are locality and separability two distinct notions?

Is there any difference between locality and separability in quantum mechanics, or do they mean the same thing? It seems authors do not always agree.
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The Momentum Operator in QM

I've seen the 'derivation' as to why momentum is an operator, but I still don't buy it. Momentum has always been just a product $m{\bf v}$. Why should it now be an operator. Why can't we just multiply ...
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In famous Einsteins Photoelectric effect, Why does intensity of light doesn't raise the kinetic energy of the emitting electrons?

The work function of any metal is no doubt constant for it is related to electromagnetic attraction between electrons and protons. However on increasing the intensity of any light source the kinetic ...
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Moving electron - finding the wavefunction

On our modern physics class my professor did a problem: Write down a wavefunction of an electron which is moving from left to right and has an energy $100\text{ eV}$. At first i said: "Oh i know ...
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341 views

Fermi's golden rule and Probabilities in QM

In Fermi's golden rule $$P_{ab}(t)=2\pi t/\hbar \left|\langle\psi_b|V|\psi_a\rangle\right|^2 \delta(E_f-E_i)$$ for transition probability from state $a$ to $b$, how can the probability grow with ...
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603 views

QM - calculating expectation value for velocity of an electron

How do we calculate the expectation value for speed? I have heard that we must first calculate the expectaion value for kinetic energy. Someone please explain a bit what options do we have.
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466 views

Polarisation of Light and Atomic Excitation

How does an atomic transition between ground and excited states depend upon the direction of polarisation of incident light?
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436 views

Confusion about wavefunction separability

A wavefunction is inherently a multi-particle function. If you have a container that is perfectly isolated from the external universe (not possible, but just imagine it) and filled with $n$ ...
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279 views

Why does a force field leave the momentum operator unchanged in the Schrödinger equation?

The reasoning leading to the Schrödinger equation goes as follows: A plane wave in empty space has the following form: $$\psi = e^{i(kx-\omega t)}$$ Einstein had previously explained the ...
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Wavefunction as a combination of two stationary states - how to find those states?

Lets say we have a particle in a infinite square well which has a wavefunction like this ($A$ is some constant and $d$ is the width of the well): \begin{align} A\left[ \sin \left(\frac{2 \pi ...
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349 views

Dirac Delta Potential and bound/scattered states

Why does the attractive Dirac Delta distribution (function) potential $V = \alpha\delta$(x) (for negative $\alpha$) yield both bound AND scattered states? Is this due to the definition of the Dirac ...
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Bounded and Unbounded (Scattering) States in Quantum Mechanics

I understand that bounded states in quantum mechanics imply that the total energy of the state, $E$, is less than the potential $V_0$ at + or - spatial infinity. Similarly, the scattering state ...
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Finite potential well problem - calculating the ground state

1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data Electron of is in a 1-D potential well of depth $20eV$ width $d=0.2 nm$ in his ground state $N=1$. What is the energy of the ground ...
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936 views

Born's Rule, What is the Reason? [duplicate]

As far as I've read online, there isn't a good explanation for the Born Rule. Is this the case? Why does taking the square of the wave function give you the Probability? Naturally it removes negatives ...
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218 views

How to superpose an wavefunction for an infinite potential well / interval - $-d/2 <x<d/2$

I know that two functions which describe the state of a particle in an infinite square (on interval $-d/2<x<d/2$) well are like: \begin{align} \psi_{even}&= ...
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263 views

On the atomic level, how is incandescent light structured?

I want to know from the smallest possible originating structures how the light I see generated from heat is made by atoms themselves.