Quantum mechanics describes the microscopic properties of nature in a regime where classical mechanics no longer applies. It explains phenomena such as the wave-particle duality, quantization of energy and the uncertainty principle and is generally used in single body systems. Use the ...

learn more… | top users | synonyms (4)

1
vote
2answers
69 views

Atomic orbitals

I just studied atomic orbitals in a theoretical QM class, and I'm left with several questions, that are probably more questions in quantum chemistry: Many orbitals seem to have a preferred axis - ...
5
votes
1answer
78 views

Understanding electronic band structure diagrams

Currently I'm trying to understand electronic band structures such as depicted below: And following questions were arisen. Why are there multiple lines in valence side and conduction side? Where ...
-1
votes
0answers
11 views

Periodic Boundary Conditions in 2D Box [duplicate]

In a 2D box with both dimensions of $L$, the electron can move freely within this large box. Use periodic boundary condition, and find the wavefunctions and corresponding energies in this 2D box. I'm ...
1
vote
0answers
30 views

Intuition behind modeling quantum impurities as two-level systems

I've been trying to get a basic understanding of quantum impurity problems, starting with the Anderson model. The Wikipedia article (along with some review articles) seems to explain the simplest ...
1
vote
1answer
37 views

How to determine if a potential admits bound states?

According to Griffith's Quantum Mechanics, "$E$ must exceed the minimum value of $V(x)$, for every normalizable solution to the time independent Schroedinger equation" As an example, there is no ...
1
vote
2answers
59 views

What is the implication of Schmit decomposition?

According to schmidt decomposition if I have pure state $|\psi\rangle$ in the composite hilbert space $AB$ ( both $A$ and $B$ are hilbert spaces of dimension $n$ ) then it can be writen as ...
0
votes
0answers
40 views

Time evolution of interaction Hamiltonian in the Heisenberg picture

How does the interaction Hamiltonian of a (finite dim) quantum system with Hamiltonian: $H(t) = H_0 + w(t) H_I$ evolve in time in the Heisenberg picture. Is there anything special about the way ...
4
votes
1answer
47 views

Do 2-body elliptic orbits precess in special relativity?

Einstein famously explained the anomalous precession of Mercury by showing that in general relativity elliptic orbits precess even in the 2-body problem. But apparently in the early days of quantum ...
0
votes
1answer
23 views

Scintillation from wave function

Suppose we have a system with a (non-relativistic) electron whose state is described by a time-dependent wave function $\psi(x,t)$. Then I think it's correct to say that if we introduce a phosphor ...
0
votes
1answer
34 views

Question about group velocity and travelling waves

I'm trying to learn some basic quantum mechanics and I have a question related to group velocity of a travelling wave. I know there are already a few questions related to group velocity, but I ...
3
votes
1answer
78 views

How to show time reversal symmetry does not break in the tight binding Hamiltonian for the honeycomb lattice?

The Hamiltonian of the honeycomb lattice is $$ H=\sum_{k\sigma}t(k) a_{k\sigma}^\dagger b_{k\sigma}+h.c $$ Where $t(-k)=t^*(k)$. If we do a time reversal transformation(according the answer to this ...
4
votes
1answer
104 views

What is the idea behind canonical quantization?

From what I understand, canonical quantization of a classical theory consists of replacing the observables by abstract operators, of which only the commutation rules, which have to correspond to the ...
4
votes
0answers
55 views

The wavefunction of the superconductor A consists of two parts: B and C

In reading this article, I come across this paragraph: The pink marked place is where I can't understand, why can we use direct product of the former but not the later? This is may be a basic ...
0
votes
1answer
71 views

Path dependent phase in quantum mechanics

In elementary treatments of quantum mechanics, we are taught that the wavefunction of a single particle is complex valued ($\Psi : \mathbb{R}^3 \to \mathbb{C}$). In particular, the wavefunction has a ...
0
votes
0answers
13 views

Metastable bound state in resonance scattering

In resonance scattering, why does the mean lifetime of the "metastable" bound state depend inversely on the width of the resonance?
2
votes
2answers
45 views

Spin State Energy Levels

When a spin-1/2 particle is placed in a magnetic field that is strong enough and varies slowly enough in space and time, it will become polarized and its spin will either align or anti-align with the ...
4
votes
2answers
86 views

“Equidistant” spectra in quantum mechanics [duplicate]

In one-dimensional quantum mechanics, it seems that the only kind of potential able to produce an "equidistant" spectrum, i.e. with $E_{n+1}-E_{n}=\text{constant}$, is the harmonic oscillator. Why is ...
0
votes
2answers
126 views

Why superpositions? [closed]

I've seen a lot of stuff on superpositions, namely the double slit experiment. And every video I watch, it tells me the same thing: It's amazing that when these particles are being observed they ...
0
votes
2answers
35 views

How can I calculate the partial trace for a combined state of a pair of two-level atoms to get a reduced state?

Let's say I have a combined state of a pair of two-level atoms, $A$ and $B$, given by the density matrix: $$ \rho = \frac{1}{2}\mid g_A, g_B \rangle \langle g_A, g_B\mid + \frac{1}{2} \mid g_A, e_B ...
0
votes
1answer
50 views

What would be the Slater's determinant representation for an excited state?

Setup Introducing this spinorbital notation: \begin{align} \Psi_1=\chi_{(r1)}\alpha_{(\omega1)} = 1 \\ \Psi_1=\chi_{(r1)}\beta_{(\omega1)} = \bar{1} \end{align} and the Slater's determinant, for ...
0
votes
0answers
24 views

What is the connection between Bragg's condition with reduced EK diagram?

In my course notes the professor mentioned that there was some relationship between the Bragg's condition and the first Bernoulli zone of the reduced EK diagram. Specifically, the boundary before ...
0
votes
3answers
80 views

Levi-Civita symbol and Hermitian conjugate

When we take the Hermitian conjugate/dagger of an operator expression which contains a Levi-Civita symbol, do we need to transpose the Levi-Civita symbol? E.g., for the crossproduct ...
1
vote
1answer
117 views

Questions about the formalism of Quantum Mechanics

I have to do a presentation on this. I'm not expected to do something really detailed, but I'm not understanding the mathematical formalism. I would like to receive general answers to these questions: ...
4
votes
0answers
95 views

Quantum Mechanics and Economics… What [migrated]

I was reading this paper: http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2002698&download=yes The author has the model presented here: ...
1
vote
2answers
89 views

What state does the particle in a box occupy?

My textbook derives the equations for the different energy states $E_n$ of the particle in a box. But my professor in class said this example was a good one because it spoke about the "superposition ...
1
vote
3answers
146 views

What is the meaning of “ Ψ is not a measurable quantity in itself”?

I want to know that why the wavefunction Ψ as a complex quantity (i.e $A+iB$ form) in quantum mechanics and somewhere I have studied that Ψ is not a measurable quantity in itself that's why we ...
1
vote
1answer
41 views

About shift operators

The question is this: Does $$L_+ L_- Y_{lm} $$ ,where $Y_{lm}$ is a spherical harmonic function, equals to zero. If so, why? The two operators above are defined as $$L_+ ={L_x + iL_y } $$ $$L_-={L_x ...
3
votes
1answer
69 views

Considering $\langle \underline{q} \mid \underline{p} \rangle=\frac{1}{(2\pi\hbar)^{n/2}}e^{i\underline{q}\cdot\underline{p}/\hbar}$ [duplicate]

I have been given the following complete systems of eigenvectors $$\mathbf{Q}\mid\mathbf{q} \rangle=\mathbf{q}\mid\mathbf{q} \rangle, \quad \mathbf{P}\mid\mathbf{p} \rangle=\mathbf{p}\mid\mathbf{p} ...
1
vote
0answers
61 views

Deriving effective model without integrating out degrees of freedom in path integral formalism?

In path integral formalism of quantum field theory (particle physics or condensed matter), one can in principle integrate out part of the degrees of freedom so as to attain an effective model ...
0
votes
0answers
40 views

what is a clock state?

What is a clock state in atomic physics ? I read this term here http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2708678/ and tried to find a reference to explain the same but have been unable to find this ...
1
vote
1answer
46 views

Angular momentum wavefunctions with respect to different axes

I've been learning about quantum angular momentum, and I have a question about the relationship between quantum mechanical angular momentum wavefunctions with respect to different axes. I know that ...
-2
votes
1answer
107 views

What happens in a universe with only two electrons? [closed]

What happens in a universe with only two electrons? Do they stay as waves or do they collapse into particles?
0
votes
0answers
15 views

For an entangled state consisting of systems A and B, if A is measured when does the wavefunction at B collapse? [duplicate]

If there are two systems A and B, with an entangled state consisting of $$\mid \psi \rangle = \frac{1}{\sqrt{2}} (\mid \uparrow _A \rangle \,\, \otimes \mid \uparrow _{B} \rangle \,+ \mid \downarrow ...
0
votes
1answer
92 views

Commutator and Hamiltonian [closed]

Assume that $[\hat{A},\hat{H}]_-=0$ and $[\hat{B},\hat{H}]_-=0$ but we know that $[\hat{A},\hat{B}]_-\neq 0$. Then there exists degenerate stationary states of $H$. How to prove it?
0
votes
2answers
65 views

Derivation of plane wave from inner product of position ket and momentum ket

In textbooks it seems to be taken for granted that $$\langle \mathbf{r}|\mathbf{k}\rangle ~=~ \frac{1}{\sqrt{\Omega}}\exp(i\mathbf{k}\cdot\mathbf{r}).$$ I'm sure it's obvious but is there a ...
0
votes
2answers
54 views

Understanding notation regarding particles states and wavefunctions

In the development in my notes of second quantisation I have a problem in understanding notation. We start by considering a basis $\psi_i(\mathbf{r})$ for the Hilbert space of single particle ...
2
votes
1answer
75 views

Quantum mechanics and Classical limit(s)

I have tried to make sense of this and i am not sure i get it. What i gather from this page about the classical limit is: You need coherent states something like $\hbar \to 0$ is not really enaugh. ...
3
votes
3answers
96 views

Physical meaning of quantum interpretations [closed]

Do interpretations of quantum mechanics have physical meaning? An argument for no would be the fact that no matter the interpretation, one gets the same measurements. They also do not follow logical ...
3
votes
1answer
76 views

Can reduced density matrices of sub systems of an entangled composite system be different?

In a 4-dimensional hilbert space, only 4 entangled states( normalized ) are possible ( if I am not wrong ), the bell basis. In each of the state in bell basis the reduced density matrix is ...
5
votes
0answers
53 views

Is there a physical interpretation of Neumann boundary conditions for the free Schrodinger equation on a domain?

Let $\Omega$ be a domain in $\mathbb{R}^n$. Consider the time-independent free Schrodinger equation $\Delta \psi = E\psi$. Solutions subject to Dirichlet boundary conditions can be physically ...
0
votes
1answer
25 views

Monoatomic fluids and free space around atoms

In monoatomic fluids the atoms can move quite freely around each other. Is there any thermodynamic/statistical mechanic equation how much free space there is between the atoms? This has to be ...
1
vote
0answers
14 views

Classical limit and generalized coherent states

In quantum optics coherent states introduced by Glauber have a localized probability distribution in classical phase-space with maximum following classical equations of motions. This is not a ...
0
votes
0answers
22 views

Measurement of two qubits in a tensor product space

I understand that if we have two qubits, say $\Psi \in \mathcal{H}_1 \bigotimes \mathcal{H}_2$ where Alice has the first qubit, and she makes a measurement and ends up with the state $\phi \in ...
0
votes
0answers
26 views

Physical significance of Cayley Transform

In the book on Quantum Mechanics by Capri (in Chapter 6), its said that an operator $A$ is self adjoint if the operator, $U$ given by $$ U = (A - i I)(A + i I)^{-1} = -(I+iA)(I-iA)^{-1} = -\text ...
2
votes
3answers
240 views

Normalization problem with hydrogen wavefunction

Suppose you have a mix of states made up of the Hydrogen $\lvert nlm \rangle$ states where one of the coefficients is unknown. For example: $$ \lvert \psi\rangle=A\lvert 100\rangle + ...
0
votes
0answers
23 views

Unitarity of Symmetrisation operators

How can i proove that the symmetrisation operators $S_{\pm}$ are unitary? Defining $S_{\pm}$ on the $N$ Particle Fock Space by it's effect on $|\Psi \rangle=| \Psi_1 \rangle \otimes... \otimes| ...
1
vote
0answers
29 views

Is my window's semi-transparency a consequence of elementary quantum mechanics? [duplicate]

Studying mathematical concepts of quantum mechanics, I have recently become familiar with the classical model of one-dimensional particle being scattered by a potential barrier. As a mathematician, I ...
3
votes
2answers
65 views

Why do we not require higher derivatives to match at boundary when solving the Schrödinger equation in a given potential?

When solving the time independent Schrödinger equation for a given potential in 1D, the main part of the solving involves matching boundary conditions. Usually, we require the value and the first ...
0
votes
1answer
35 views

Question regarding NaCl equilibrium separation

So I am tutoring someone later and one of the problems is from Eisberg/Resnick Ch 12. The potential energy $V$ of NaCl can be described emperically by $$V = \frac{-e^2}{4\pi\epsilon_0 ...
0
votes
0answers
26 views

what does the i-v curve in josephson junction mean?

according to the i-v curve for Josephson junction tunneling for S-I-S (superconductor-insulator-superconductor): do we have any tunneling current for 0< V<= Vc ? if yes, then why don't we show ...