Quantum mechanics describes the microscopic properties of nature in a regime where classical mechanics no longer applies. It explains phenomena such as the wave-particle duality, quantization of energy and the uncertainty principle and is generally used in single body systems. Use the ...

learn more… | top users | synonyms (4)

2
votes
2answers
96 views

Why we cannot describe operator for force $F$ in quantum mechanics?

In quantum mechanics we describe operators corresponding to momentum but we don't define operator for force what is the reason behind it?
3
votes
2answers
151 views

Why are neutron absorption cross sections high at low incident energy?

For example, U-235 fission cross section looks like this: As I understand it, the resonances peaks correspond to discrete quantum states of the excited compound nucleus. As you go higher, the ...
1
vote
0answers
34 views

Problems and applications of Topoligcal Insulators today [closed]

I am learning about topological insulators in my applications of quantum mechanics class and i was wondering why exactly are they important? Who cares if the material only conducts on the surface? ...
1
vote
0answers
94 views

What does it mean when it is said that “General Relativity and Quantum Mechanics are incompatible”? [duplicate]

In many of the pop-science-y documentaries on theoretical physics I often hear the statement: "General Relativity and Quantum Mechanics are incompatible" Some googling tells me that "General ...
0
votes
2answers
172 views

Light, being a probability wave, carries energy; does an electron wave also carry energy? If so, how?

The entity "light" behaves as a wave & particle. The wave is actually probability wave . That is, to every point in a light wave we can attach a numerical probability that a photon can be ...
0
votes
2answers
50 views

Why is the imaginary unit conventionally put on the right hand side of commutation relations? [closed]

Commutation relations in quantum mechanics are usually written in the form $$ [x_i,p_j] = i \hbar \delta_{ij} $$ with the imaginary unit $i$ put on the right hand side of the equation. But ...
2
votes
6answers
158 views

Rutherford's gold foil experiment: can alphas be deflected by electrons vs. nucleus?

In this experiment, is it possible that some of the alpha particles are deflected by the electrons? Gold, after all, usually also has ~79 of them in each atom. Since the alpha particles want ...
1
vote
2answers
150 views

Having Trouble Understanding Feynman Diagrams [closed]

So recently I have became interested in quantum physics. However when I read up on quantum physics Feynman diagrams appear everywhere, and I do not understand them! Here is a Feynman diagram that is ...
0
votes
0answers
29 views

Any importance of $i$ before the time reversal operator for spin-1/2 system?

I've read about that: For systems with spin 1/2, time-reversal symmetry has the operator $\mathcal{T}=i\sigma_y K$. I wonder if the imaginary unit $i$ has any importance. Without $i$, ...
2
votes
1answer
54 views

Pion decay into electron and anti-neutrino

In Peskin and Schroeder Books Chapter 5 subsubection Bound State equation (5.43) $\mathcal{M}(\uparrow \uparrow \rightarrow B)=\sqrt{2M}\int ...
1
vote
1answer
37 views

Centrifugal Term

I'm studying quantum mechanics with Griffiths (2 nd edition) and I have one question related to the Schrodinger equation in spherical coordinates. In the radial equation: ...
1
vote
0answers
38 views

Quantum Localization

Hi every body, Could someone please give me clarification and explanation about localization, localization length and Quantum localization? All i know is that it has something to do with diffusion. ...
0
votes
0answers
46 views

Corrections to the Equipartitio theorem

Does anyone know why sometimes $E = \frac{3}{2}k_{b}T $ is written as $E = \pi k_{b}T$. Where does this come from?
2
votes
1answer
36 views

Why does a quantum cloner imply superluminal communication

I am wondering why superluminal communication would be possible if a quantum cloner would exist? The common argument (FLASH) goes as follows: Alice and Bob share the Bell state $$ |\psi^-\rangle = ...
1
vote
1answer
24 views

How to prepare the Stern-Gerlach experiment for a particular state

If we want to form a diagram or calculate the angles at which the magnets need to be positioned in the Stern-Gerlach setup,how do we proceed? For example, if I want to prepare the following state, ...
0
votes
2answers
56 views

Probability from classical physics compared with quantum mechanics [closed]

$|\psi\rangle$=$\frac{1}{\sqrt5}|\uparrow_z\rangle+\frac{2}{\sqrt5}|\downarrow_z\rangle$ a)What is the probability of obtaining $+\frac{\hbar}{2}$ for $S_x$? b)If after obtaining ...
-2
votes
0answers
23 views

Probability from classical physics compared with quantum mechanics [duplicate]

$$|\psi\rangle=\frac{1}{\sqrt5}|\uparrow_z\rangle+\frac{2}{\sqrt5}|\downarrow_z\rangle$$ a)What is the probability of obtaining $+\frac{\hbar}{2}$ for $S_x$? b)If after obtaining ...
2
votes
2answers
108 views

An attempt to understand Quantum mechanics [closed]

Can I learn quantum mechanics just by knowing basic calculus and algebra? I know basic differential calculus and integral calculus. I am willing to study to understand what quantum mechanics means. ...
-1
votes
0answers
18 views

With quantum entanglement, why does the spin of a particle depend upon probability when measured is at an angle?

In this video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZuvK-od647c it talks about how the particle's being spin up or down when measured at an angle depends on this probability: cos^2(theta/2). Why is it ...
45
votes
1answer
4k views

Is it possible to “see” atoms?

As per my knowledge, atoms are small beyond our imaginations. But there is an image on Wikipedia that shows silicon atoms observed at the surface of silicon carbide crystals. The image: How can we ...
0
votes
0answers
37 views

Hamiltonian for semiconductor

I was wondering which terms we need in a semiconductor Hamiltonian where no transition between the valence and conduction band occur? First we would have a term describing the energy of the full ...
1
vote
0answers
52 views

How to find creation and annihilation operators? [duplicate]

I get confused when trying to find this. Please describe it as simply as possible, but keep in mind I have no budget whatsoever to pay for textbooks, so here goes: How do you find the creation and ...
1
vote
1answer
54 views

Spectral lines and QM

In the various presentations I've seen so far in atomic physics of series such as the Balmer series, the wavelength of each spectral line is definite - but in QM, free particles have no definite ...
5
votes
4answers
331 views

Can we change a photon's frequency in mid-air?

Can we have a light source emitting photons in the infrared range and after, lets say, 5 meters, these photons become a photon in the x-ray range? The only way I know we can change a photon's ...
-2
votes
1answer
60 views

Are there nonlinear models of quantum mechanics which forbid superluminal signaling?

What would a nonlinear model of quantum mechanics which forbids superluminal signaling look like? Of course, a nonlinear $\psi$-ontic theory with entangled states could have superluminal effects upon ...
1
vote
0answers
20 views

Lindhard function for surface plasmon

Is there anybody that knows how to calculate the Lindhard function for the surface plasmon (between the surface of two metals of different dielectrics)? What I'm looking for is to find this function ...
0
votes
1answer
29 views

Particle on a ring model for electron motion in Porphine and highest occupied state

I'm studying for a test and I came across the following question: The particle on a ring is a useful model for the motion of electrons around the porphine ring. We may treat the group as a ...
3
votes
0answers
114 views

Why is imaginary time “outdated”? [closed]

I was looking at reviews for Sakurai's Quantum Mechanics textbook, and some mentioned it being outdated, specifically mentioning his use of imaginary time. Is this idea deliberately avoided in modern ...
1
vote
1answer
31 views

How are energy states of photons reason for frequency independence in Compton scattering

I am reading on Compton scattering, more specifically on how Compton interpreted his results. He observed that the frequency of the scattered radiation was independent of the material used, so he ...
0
votes
0answers
32 views

Partial diagonalization of the Fock matrix

I'm currently writing my dissertation on the application of SCF semi-empirical methods to large systems, in particular proteins, and I'm stuck with a problem: I don't understand why, given the fact ...
0
votes
1answer
65 views

Interpretation of Fermi-Dirac statistics

I was reading that as temperature increases the energy at which $n(E)=0.5$ shifts to lower energies as these lower energy states become depopulated. Could someone explain that, what it means and why ...
1
vote
0answers
38 views

WKB Quantization Condition - negative?

In deriving the quantization condition for a bound state in a potential with "no verticle walls" we start with the WKB connection formulas to find the wavefunction in the interior of the well ...
0
votes
1answer
40 views

How much time between measurements do you have in order to make the same measurement on a particle?

As I understand it, you can make a measurement on a particle and if you quickly carry out a second measurement you will get the same outcome as the prior measurement. If this is the case, how much ...
0
votes
3answers
60 views

Energy of system in eigenstate of Hamiltonian

I know how to find the spectrum of the Hamiltonian to get the allowed energies for a system. If the spectrum is quantized, I can get definite values for each energy level. But when the system is in ...
0
votes
2answers
36 views

Allowed system energies from quantized Hamiltonian spectra

To find the allowed energies for a system, I can find the spectrum of the Hamiltonian $\hat{H}_{\psi}$ given a wavefunction $\psi$ representing the state of the system. 3 cases might happen: either ...
0
votes
1answer
48 views

Neutrino mass and the Majorana equation

I can't seem find this on the Internet. What does the Majorana equation predict neutrino masses to be (if they were their own antiparticle), and how? (I have little understanding of spinors, btw...) ...
0
votes
0answers
23 views

What are the conditions of wave function continuity when solving for Dirac Spinors as done in “Klein paradox” paper by Novoselov?

In the paper "Chiral tunneling and Klein paradox" paper by Katsnelson, Novoselov, and Geim, they use the wave function for Dirac spinors. What are the conditions for continuity of the wave function ...
0
votes
1answer
34 views

Why does negative energy imply that a system is bounded? [duplicate]

I wanted to know why "negative energy" of a two particle system implies that it is bounded. That is what happens in the case of a hydrogen atom; my textbooks say so, but they do not give any reason ...
0
votes
1answer
32 views

Physically realizable (quantum) system

Given a system of arbitrary number of commuting observables, can one always exhibit a system that realizes it? For example, suppose we have 3 diagonal (and, therefore, commuting) matrices $X= \left( ...
1
vote
2answers
26 views

Notions of “confined” and “metastable” states?

What is the exact definition of terms "confined state" and "metastable state", in the context of quantum mechanics? Can we also have a "confined metastable state"? Can we somehow easily link these ...
1
vote
3answers
76 views

Tensor product in quantum mechanics

In Cohen-Tannoudji's Quantum Mechanics book the tensor product of two two Hilbert spaces $(\mathcal H = \mathcal H_1 \otimes \mathcal H_2)$ was introduced in (2.312) by saying that to every pair of ...
-2
votes
2answers
90 views

How do we know $\psi$ depends on $n,l,m$

Regarding the separation of $\psi$ to an angular and radial part, why does each part have a specific dependence of the quantum numbers? How can Schrodinger equation describe a system just from its ...
0
votes
1answer
44 views

Time reversal on superposition: I think [duplicate]

Imagine I have a box, and in it, I have a photon in a superposition of state |1> and |0>. I look into the box and register that the photon is in state |1>. Now, if I have ALL information in the ...
1
vote
1answer
40 views

Solving for the density operator in the quantum Brownian motion master equation

I want to solve for the density operator in the quantum Brownian motion master equation, \begin{align} \begin{aligned} ...
1
vote
1answer
81 views

Hartree Fock equations

I don't understand how the Hartree Fock equations define an iterative method! For this discussion, I am referring to the HF equations as described here: click me! Basically if you guess a bunch of ...
1
vote
1answer
37 views

Permutation operator and second quantization

I just read that a permutation operator $P_{i,j}$ acts on a product state $|a_1,...,a_n \rangle \in H^n$ by $$P_{i,j} |a_1,...,a_i,a_j,...a_n\rangle = |a_1,...,a_j,a_i,...a_n \rangle .$$ Now my ...
6
votes
2answers
109 views

Triangular barrier in infinite potential well

Suppose I am looking to solve the wavefunction for the following 1D potential: $$U(x) = \begin{cases}V_0\frac{a-|x|}{a}&\quad\text{for}\quad|x|<a ...
-1
votes
1answer
36 views

Expectation value of operators in quantum mechanics

Can the expectation value of an operator be zero?
1
vote
2answers
41 views

Show that a function takes the following form using the definition for the function of an operator

If $f(z)$ is a function with a Taylor series expansion $$f(z)=\sum _{ n=0 }^{ \infty }{c_n z^n },$$ then we define $$f(M)=\sum _{ n=0 }^{ \infty }{c_n M^n }.$$ First consider ...
6
votes
1answer
418 views

Have they really photographed light behaving both as a particle and a wave?

I just came across this article where they are claiming that they have photographed light behaving both as a wave and a particle! The paper has been published in Nature Communications and I read the ...