Quantum mechanics describes the microscopic properties of nature in a regime where classical mechanics no longer applies. It explains phenomena such as the wave-particle duality, quantization of energy and the uncertainty principle and is generally used in single body systems. Use the ...

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Perturbation theory emitting high order powers

For my second-order energy correction for a harmonic oscillator in an electric field I have the following: $$q^2\varepsilon^2\sum_{m\neq n}\frac{|\langle m|x|n\rangle|^2}{E^{(0)}_n-E^{(0)}_m}+\text{ ...
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How do I calculate integer and half integer spin? [closed]

How do I calculate integer and half integer spin, and how do I use the calculations?
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Why are atomic quadrupole moments calculated using nuclear spin?

It's my understanding that electric quadrupoles interact with the gradient of an electric field, and I understand roughly how this works. I am trying to calculate the interaction between an atomic ...
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63 views

The role of SO(3) and SU(2) in quantum mechanics [duplicate]

When studying the irreducible representations of SO(3) one usually looks at the irreps of the infinitesimal rotations instead, i.e. the ones of so(3), the Lie Algebra of SO(3). The Irreps of so(3) can ...
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Why do we look at the representations of $SO(3)$ in QM?

I have a bit of an understanding issue why the representations of $SO(3)$ are so important for Quantum Mechanics. When looking at its Irreps one gets the Spin and Angular Momentum operators and thus ...
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Symmetric eigenfunctions?

So a symmetric eigenfunction / wavefunction is defined as: $$P_{ij} ψ_a (r_1,r_2,…,r_i,…,r_j,…,r_N )=ψ_a(r_1,r_2,…,r_i,…,r_j,…,r_N )$$ But for it to be symmetric does this have to be true for all $ij$ ...
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Neil deGrasse Tyson says that electrons “teleport” between energy levels?

This page: https://blog.afach.de/?p=62 Discusses the error Neil deGrasse Tyson made when talking about electronic transitions (video included there). Tyson clearly said in his Cosmos series that ...
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74 views

Inner products containing the tensor product of two operators

The book Nielsen & Chuang "Quantum Computation and Quantum Information" presents the concept of tensor products as follows. Suppose we have the vectors $|v\rangle$ and $|w\rangle$ which exist in ...
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980 views

Can I steal your electron?

The following paragraph has been extracted from the Wikipedia (Atomic orbitals): Simple pictures showing orbital shapes are intended to describe the angular forms of regions in space where the ...
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3answers
421 views

Classical analogue of Heisenberg and Schrödinger pictures?

What do the Heisenberg and Schrödinger pictures in quantum mechanics correspond to in classical mechanics (if they correspond to anything)? It's kind of weird, because (if I understand it well) in ...
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60 views

Quantum computing and ambiguity

I do a bit of hobby programming and I often search the internet for little oddities that are fun to ponder over. I have read a few passages that try to explain quantum computing to the layman like ...
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Why does proton and electron attract each other? [duplicate]

Not that their charges are opposite! "+" & "-" are the signs we named them. By nature Why do they attract each other? And Why do they repel each other?
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Why do rotations of a multicomponent state function take this form?

I am reading Leslie Ballentine's Quantum Mechanics, section 7.2, which is all about the explicit form of the Angular Momentum operators. I understand how he gets the form for the single component ...
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58 views

Normalising a wave function in parts?

If we have the wave function $\psi_{100}(r,\theta,\phi)=R_{10}(r)Y_{00}(\theta,\phi)$ when we are normalising it we do the following: $$1=\int| \psi_{100}(r,\theta,\phi)|^2sin(\theta) r^2drd\theta ...
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Link between Quantum and Classical Mechanics [duplicate]

In classical mechanics we have momentum as generator of translation by following definition: $$f(x+\delta x)=f(x)+[f(x),p]\delta x+....$$ I was wondering whether using this relation and commutation ...
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Books on foundations of QM [duplicate]

I am seeking for books on foundations of Quantum Mechanics with subjects like the EPR experiment, Bell's theorem, the problem of measurement, entanglement, decoherence, nonlocality, interpretations, ...
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Electron shells in atoms: What causes them to exist as they do?

I have seen similar posts, but I haven't seen what seems to be a clear and direct answer. Why do only a certain number of electrons occupy each shell? Why are the shells arranged in certain distances ...
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3answers
73 views

What does the $y$-axis represent in the atomic spectra and what is its significance?

The picture is an emission spectrum of Helium. The spectrum has sharp lines (peaks) at certain wave lengths characterizing it as helium. Agreed that it characterizes Helium as atomic spectral line ...
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58 views

Differentiation operator with respect to observable acting as a function of the observable?

In his Principles of Quantum Mechanics Dirac writes: $$\int \langle \phi \frac{d}{dq}|q'\rangle dq' \psi(q')=\int \phi(q') dq' \frac{d\psi(q')}{dq'}.$$ To me it is rather strange, and it seems as if ...
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If virtual particles have negative mass why do they contribute positive mass to atoms?

According to Lawrence Krauss, atoms containing in our body consists of merely 10% (if I remember correctly) of our total mass. The rest come from virtual particles popping in and out of existence from ...
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1answer
70 views

Amateur thoughts on QM theory at celestial scale

Some amateur scientist asked me that why can't one just simply apply the entire theory of QM at atomic scale to "quantize" celestial system with a different choice of $\hslash$, which he believed can ...
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98 views

Quantum Mechanical States

What can be the precise answer to the question that Quantum states are complex and infinite dimensional. Why is this so? Is it because they belong to the complex Hilbert space? Even if they ...
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Is the subadditivity of quantum entropy valid in the infinite-dimensional case?

Does the subadditivity (and strong subadditivity) of quantum entropy hold for infinite dimensional quantum systems as well? Unfortunately the books in my hand give proof for finite dimensional cases ...
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Why are results of Bell's experiments considered to “break realism”?

Related to my previous question (Why would classical correlation in Bell's experiment be a linear function of angle?), as a newbie in quantum mechanics, I am also unable to find the reason to why ...
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Why do people say “Bosons are either gapped or condensated, except physical principle protected cases (Goldstone boson, photon).”?

Bosons are either gapped or condensated, except physical principle protected cases (Goldstone boson, photon, etc.). I read this in a paper (version1 of http://arxiv.org/abs/1404.3728v1, 1st page 1st ...
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Angular momentum eigenstates

My textbook says that if $L^2$ is the square of the angular momentum and if it's eigenstate is $|\alpha,\beta>$ then its eigenvalue is $\hbar^2\alpha$ i.e. ...
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204 views

What does the magnetic field of the (quantum-mechanical) electron look like?

While a treatment of electron spin can be found in any introductory textbook, I've noticed that the electron's magnetic field seems to be treated classically. Presumably this is because a quantum ...
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57 views

Why would classical correlation in Bell's experiment be a linear function of angle?

Sorry if it's a newbie question, but I have trouble understanding the following part in the Wikipedia's explanation for the Bell's theorem: With the measurements oriented at intermediate angles ...
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109 views

Could the universe have evolved WITHOUT the non-determinism of quantum mechanics? [closed]

(I'm going to make a few conjectures here - please answer the question in light of them as if they were true, even though of course they may be overly simplistic or wrong) Assuming that: the ...
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108 views

Does Free Will Theorem imply that quantum mechanics plays crucial role in our brain’s functioning (consciousness)?

Is opposite statement of Free Will Theorem right: If elementary particles have a certain amount of free will, then so must we? Because to me elementary particles does have a bit of free will – quantum ...
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86 views

Bloch theorem, Energy, Free electron

I'm trying to learn on my own a bit of solid physics to tackle semiconductors afterwards. I'm struggling with the Energy versus $k$ diagrams for a free electron which shows that for a single value of ...
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75 views

Macroscopic Forces from QED

In QED the carrier for electromagnetic interaction is a photon, while macroscopic forces are due to electromagnetic interaction (by macroscopic forces I mean: normal force, object collision, friction ...
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67 views

Can we correctly define momentum operator only by means of position operator and their commutation relation?

In "J.M. Ziman. Electrons and Phonons: The Theory of Transport Phenomena in Solids" the author formally introduces the position (displacement) operator and then defines the momentum operator with the ...
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54 views

Will an electron gun fire behind it?

If an electron travels as a wave, can it therefore not be aimed with any precision? If you fire an electron gun, can't you aim it at a particular slit? If the electron travels as a wave, will an ...
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Berry's phase: in which space does the degeneracy appear?

This question follows a previous one of mine: Adiabatic theorem and Berry phase. In his original paper [ M. V. Berry, Proc. R. Soc. Lond. A. Math. Phys. Sci. 392, 45 (1984) ], Berry discussed the ...
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What is it that makes an electron maintain a distance from the positively charged nucleus? [duplicate]

What is it that makes an electron maintain a distance from the positively charged nucleus? Why aren't electrons merely pulled into and absorbed by the nucleus ?
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77 views

What is the performance of a silicon crystal that makes it an essential component to computing

I'm on a thread of interest in the precise physics that allow the creation of the computing process. It began as a question posted in search of an understandable explanation of what physical form ...
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1answer
35 views

Quantum mechanical proof of Conway's SPIN and TWIN axioms?

I think I understand correlations of EPR-state and GHZ-state which deal with spin-1/2 particles and (-1, 1) measured values. Conway's state is spin-1 particle state with (-1, 0, 1) measured values. ...
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50 views

Polarizing beam splitters for X-rays?

What is the lower bound for the wavelength concerning polarizing beam splitters? Especially I ask for interferometer experiments with single photons. Of course I know that they exist for all ...
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1answer
104 views

Local number operators in quantum field theory

Redhead claims in his paper "More ado about nothing" (http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2FBF02054660) that number operators associated with different space points (at fixed time) fail to ...
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Does this photograph portray double muon impact with nanogold atoms?

1PHOTO 1: Macro-photograph of an NIH/FDA TEM of a nanogold dark stained biological sample projected onto Silver Halide (AgX) photographic gel paper. On June 10 I questioned if PHOTO 1 ...
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$m_l=0$ in Hydrogen atom of Scrodinger equation

$m_l=0$ corresponds to s-orbital and the values associated are: $$\lambda=2\pi r/m_l\to\infty$$ It means a wave of of infinite wavelength has a constant height at all values of $\phi$(azimuthal ...
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Superpositions and expectation values in quantum mechanics

When the wavefunction of a particle is not an eigenfunction of an operator, the property to which the operator corresponds does not have a definite value, Why? Also consider a linear combination of ...
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Observables in Quantum Mechanics

Studying on own quantum mechanics I came across: Preceeding text: A basic postulate of quantum mechanics tells us how to set up the operator corresponding to a given observable. Observables, ...
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Differences between wave function and set of orthonormal wave functions?

I'm reading a QM book. It first says for wave function: "The state of a physical system (or particle) is completely specified by an entity associated with it called a wave function, Ψ , that in ...
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1answer
39 views

Double-slit experiment and an experimental laboratory without photons

In order to see interference pattern of an electron, after the shot, an electron must not interact with any photon. So I'm asking how can such an photonless area can be created in the universe? And ...
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72 views

Does yukawa potential of two particles have effect on each other? [on hold]

Okay,a novice here.Suppose two particle interact with Higgs field.Does The Yukawa potential created by each of them affect each other or the interaction in any way.If so,what is it physical ...
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110 views

About Quantum Mechanics

Did Feyman suggest even though Q.M. has great predictive power no one will ever really understand it ? Some people have said there may be hidden variables that explain underlying principles of Q.M. ...
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Equation for Photon and Electron Propagation [closed]

What equation accurately describes the movement of a photon? Does this equation also apply to the movement of an electron?
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56 views

Quantum Boltzmann Equation

What is the Quantum Boltzmann equation and what does it describe? I think it describes the propagation of electrons and photons but I am not sure.