Quantum mechanics describes the microscopic properties of nature in a regime where classical mechanics no longer applies. It explains phenomena such as the wave-particle duality, quantization of energy and the uncertainty principle and is generally used in single body systems. Use the ...

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34 views

Elitzur–Vaidman bomb tester value on Wikipedia

Looking at this diagram from Wikipedia: I was trying to make sense of the sentence the interference is constructive at C and destructive at D Let's take a look at the superposition at C. ...
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0answers
24 views

History of delta barrier in QM [migrated]

I'm interested in finding something out about the history of the problem of the delta potential barrier in QM. Which was the first study to propose this problem, and perhaps any particular motivation ...
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4answers
101 views

Physical intuition behind negative values for wave function?

So a positive and a positive wave function create a bonding orbital where the probability of finding an electron is summed while a positive and a negative create an anti-bonding orbital with a lower ...
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0answers
45 views

The propagator method versus Schrodinger time dependent equation [closed]

What advantage does the the propagator, $K(x,t; x',t')$, method has over the solution of Schrodinger time dependent equation (STDE) for example in harmonic ocillator problems? I don't see any. See ...
4
votes
1answer
213 views

Entanglement, Bohr-Einstein Debate, Bell's Inequality

On BBC episode The Secrets of Quantum Physics (Part 1) Jim Al-Khalili explains quantum mechanics for the layman. In the first half, he does a very good job; in the second half, either he thought his ...
5
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1answer
163 views

What's wrong with the square root version of the Klein-Gordon equation?

The Wikipedia article has a derivation of the Klein-Gordon equation. It gets to this step: $$\sqrt{\textbf{p}^2 c^2 + m^2 c^4} = E$$ and inserts the QM operators to get $$\left( \sqrt{ (-i \hbar ...
5
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1answer
143 views

Spin Glass Prince Rupert's Drop

Spin Glass is known to converge to its ground state under Simulated Annealing. The word choice is especially interesting since annealing is also the name of a process performed on actual glass. ...
0
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1answer
56 views

How to understand locality and non-locality in Quantum Mechanics?

What actually is the definition of locality and non-locality? Does non-locality in Quantum Mechanics mean however far you separate 2 entangled atoms in space, the 2 atoms can still influence each ...
4
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1answer
57 views

Performing the two slit experiment under a strong gravitational force

For elementary particles, are their associated De Broglie wavelengths affected by the spacetime curvature produced by large mass density values? I ask this as a newcomer to Q.M. so apologies if I ...
3
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1answer
54 views

Why was the Stark effect discovered much later than the Zeeman effect?

This is strange. The Zeeman effect involves the magnetic field. The Stark effect involves the electric field. In the course of classical electrodynamics, we get the impression that for many physical ...
1
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1answer
39 views

How to form the spin triplet - singlet states from two electrons with spin not an eigenstate of $ S_z $ (spins not along z-axis))

For a two electron system, we know that the total $ J^2 $ states (Triplet - Singlet) are related with the $\uparrow \downarrow $ , $\downarrow \uparrow$ , $\uparrow \uparrow$ , $\downarrow \downarrow ...
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1answer
48 views

Flip of polarisation of light

Consider an optical experiment with photons or light pulses. Is there an optical element that acts in the polarisation degree of freedom like the unitary $$ U = \frac 1 {\sqrt 2} \begin{pmatrix} 1 ...
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0answers
33 views

A real 'two line' (non-interference pattern) when observed

I have seen many interference patterns from double slit experiments but I have never seen a real 'two line' pattern when observed. Does this actually exist or is it only a conclusion? if there is an ...
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1answer
67 views

spin independent observable

Let's consider a spin independent observable $O$ (the terms of the operator don't depend upon the spin operator). If we are interested to find an eigenfunctions' basis of the wave-functions' space, ...
3
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5answers
13k views

In famous Einsteins Photoelectric effect, Why does intensity of light doesn't raise the kinetic energy of the emitting electrons?

The work function of any metal is no doubt constant for it is related to electromagnetic attraction between electrons and protons. However on increasing the intensity of any light source the kinetic ...
2
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1answer
132 views

Question on spin-orbit interaction

When you study the spin-orbit interaction in quantum mechanics, even for a simple hydrogen atom, you find only the electric field in the nucleus reference system, while in the electron reference ...
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0answers
60 views

Definition of Hamilton operator

The Hamilton operator is by definition a self-adjoint operator $H\text{: }D\left(H\right)\to\mathcal{H}$ with $D\left(H\right)\subset\mathcal{H}$ a dense linear subspace of the Hilbert space ...
3
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2answers
116 views

What was the largest object/particle tunneling observed?

What is a current record? Reference to that would be nice. and what can be expected in near future? what are the theoretical limits?
2
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2answers
71 views

How can we know that all of the results for entangled photons are not chosen when the pair is created? [duplicate]

I was reading this introduction to quantum computing that says that when one photon in a pair of entangled photon is measured, the other one will have the opposite result when measured in the same ...
3
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3answers
82 views

Does the ratio of thermal energy to planck's constant have physical significance?

I realized that I had never noticed that $\left[ \frac{\hbar}{k_B T} \right]=$ Time. At $T \approx 300 K$, we have $\frac{\hbar}{k_B T} \approx 10$ fs. What, if anything, does this quantity mean? Does ...
2
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1answer
26 views

Proton spin independent fine structure “Hamiltonian” $W_f$

To find the perturbation correction (fine structure) in the case of a degenerate energy $E_n^0$, we can diagonalize the operator $W_f^n$, the restriction of $W_f$ to the eigen-space associated to ...
2
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4answers
372 views

Is it possible for two events happen at the exact same time?

Is it possible for any two events to occur at the exact same time? As I see it, because time can always be split up into smaller units (it is infinitely divisible), we can always be more and more ...
2
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1answer
71 views

Physical meaning of wavelength of an EM wave

What is the physical meaning of the wavelength of light? This question has been asked before but I cannot find a satisfactory answer. Some respondents have said that the question is vague, I don't ...
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6answers
2k views

Why won't protons revolve around the nucleus containing electrons and neutrons?

In case of solar system,we can explain "Why Sun would not revolve around any other planet?",by giving the reason that Sun is heavier than any other planets. Heavier the body,greater will be the ...
6
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5answers
530 views

Can we change a photon's frequency in mid-air?

Can we have a light source emitting photons in the infrared range and after, lets say, 5 meters, these photons become a photon in the x-ray range? The only way I know we can change a photon's ...
12
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2answers
285 views

Is there a physical interpretation of Neumann boundary conditions for the free Schrodinger equation on a domain?

Let $\Omega$ be a domain in $\mathbb{R}^n$. Consider the time-independent free Schrodinger equation $\Delta \psi = E\psi$.[*] Solutions subject to Dirichlet boundary conditions can be physically ...
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0answers
58 views

Using the double slit experiment to prove or disprove the de Broglie-Bohm pilot wave theory

Probably a dumb question... If you have a double slit experiment with a second experiment (single or double slit) at 90 degrees intersecting the path of the first experiment, would the interference ...
1
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3answers
53 views

Is the perturbation Hamiltonian an observable?

In fine structure calculation we use the perturbation theory. The basic Hamiltonian $H_0$ is perturbed as: $H = H_0 + W$ First, the basic problem assume that $H_0$ is an observable. That allows to ...
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2answers
114 views

Function of observables in mathematical words

In mathematical words, an observable is an operator that a set of linearly independent eigenfunctions constitutes a complete basis of the wave-functions' space. Now, let's consider some observables: ...
2
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0answers
49 views

What's actually going on when light interacts with matter?

There are many different theories but all of them fail to explain all 3 phenomena of light(absorption,emission,transmission). https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CiHN0ZWE5bk ...
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2answers
152 views

$\hat{L}_{x}$ and $\hat{L}_{y}$ do not commute… or do they?

So $\hat{L}_{x}$ and $\hat{L}_{y}$ do not commute: $ [ \hat{L_{x}}, \hat{L_{y}}] = i\hbar \hat{L_{z}}$ But, what if we perform this operation on a state such that: $\hat{L_{z}} \phi_{l, m_{l}} = ...
8
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1answer
1k views

Must the derivative of the wave function at infinity be zero?

I came across a problem in Griffiths where the derivative of the wave function (with respect to position in one dimension) evaluated at $\pm\infty$ is zero. Why is this? Is it true for any function ...
1
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1answer
199 views

How does an operator transform under time reversal?

We know that a time-reversal operator $T$ can be represented as $$T=UK$$ where $U$ is some unitary operator and $K$ is the complex conjugation operator. Then under time-reversal operation, a quantum ...
1
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1answer
70 views

Is the photon's wave function the same as an electromagnetic wave(light)? [duplicate]

The first that i have been taught in Quantum Mechanics is the photoelectric phenomenon. Without analyzing it, it concludes that when we shine light at the circuit(roughly speaking), the work required ...
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3answers
170 views

Why the nonexistence of a “one sentence layman phrase” for the de Broglie relation $p=\hbar k$? [closed]

(My question seems most likely will be considered a duplicate of OP (and possibly 1, 2, 3), but it turns out to be WAY TOO LONG as a comment in OP, and the system has deleted the corresponding chat ...
1
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0answers
28 views

How come plasmon resonances of metals are capable of being tuned to different wavelengths?

I read in this article that plasmon resonances though being a pre-determined property of a metal are capable of being tuned to other wavelengths when these same metals are made into tiny ...
3
votes
1answer
368 views

Hubbard Model Hamitonian

$H = -\sum\limits_{i,j} A_{ij} c_i^{\dagger} c_j + \frac{U}{2} \sum\limits_i(c_i^\dagger c_i)(c_i^\dagger c_i -1)$ is defined to be a Hamiltonian for modeling quantum random walk of identical ...
2
votes
1answer
131 views

Proper way to quantize the string in the light-cone gauge

In many books like Polchinski and Green-Schwarz-Witten the light cone quantization is carried out in a fast way. They just use the virasoro constraint in the light-cone gauge to get the ligh-cone ...
0
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1answer
40 views

$L_y$ in terms of $L_+$ and $L_-$? [closed]

On the 5th slide of http://web.ift.uib.no/~lipniack/phys201_v08/angularmomentum.pdf, they say that: $$L_y=\frac{i}{2}(L_+-L-)$$ And this is not the only place I have seen this ...
3
votes
2answers
346 views

Hydrogen atom: potential well and orbit radii

I happened to open up an old solid-state electronics book by Sah, and in it he says: "it is evident that the electron orbit radius is half the well radius at the energy level En" The orbit radius is ...
3
votes
2answers
516 views

Second order degenerate perturbation theory

What is a good resource to learn about higher degree degenerate perturbation theory - one that involves mathematics that isn't much more advanced than first order perturbation theory? I've looked ...
1
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0answers
30 views

Quantum perturbation theory recommendations

What are some concise resources, in particular, online resources, for perturbation theory in quantum mechanics? I want something like a crash course to perturbation theory in quantum mechanics that is ...
0
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1answer
34 views

How to construct the operator and the physical experiment needed to perform an arbitrary 'measurement in a basis'?

I have taken an introductory level course in QM and have covered some advanced topics by myself and don't really understand what it means to 'measure in a particular basis'. A projective measurement ...
1
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2answers
158 views

Question about Hartle and Hawking's universal wavefunction?

My apologies in advance if this question is poorly worded or doesn't make any sense, however I have just finished reading into this theory and it seems as though Hawkings No Boundary Universe is ...
0
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1answer
136 views

What is many-body bound state?

Bound state by definition is a state when particles are bounded together, so then "many-body bound state" would be bound state for a system of many bodies. Then I have several puzzles: 1. is the state ...
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0answers
23 views

Is it possible to change the direction or bend magnetic flux? [closed]

Is it possible to change the direction or bend the magnetic flux according to our wish? What i actually want to do is that if i have a horse-shoe magnet can i bend the magnetic flux which is running ...
5
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3answers
220 views

Reason for Uncertainty principle

$$\Delta x \Delta p_x \geq \frac{\hbar}{2} $$ I understand what does Heisenberg's uncertainty principle states i.e. it's definition and it has been proven experimentally. But, can anyone please ...
4
votes
1answer
190 views

Poles for a particle scattered in a delta potential

I am working on problem a professor gave me to get an idea for the research he does, and have hit a point where I'm having a difficult time seeing where I need to go from where I'm at. I would also ...
0
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2answers
80 views

Electromagnetic wave and quantum mechanics [duplicate]

I'm very new to physics. I studied and read about quantum mechanics and what the assumptions are (wave particle duality, uncertainty principle, observation, wave function collapse, etc.), but I also ...
0
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1answer
131 views

Are Feynman's Six Easy Lectures still relevant today?

I haven't learned anything about modern physics at the university yet, but next year I will, and in the summer before I thought I would read this book, Six easy lectures from Richard Feynman. It was ...