Quantum mechanics describes the microscopic properties of nature in a regime where classical mechanics no longer applies. It explains phenomena such as the wave-particle duality, quantization of energy and the uncertainty principle and is generally used in single body systems. Use the ...

learn more… | top users | synonyms (4)

-1
votes
0answers
41 views

Why do the quantum numbers take the value they do? [duplicate]

Clearly $n$ can take any positive integer value. But what is the physics and maths behind $l=0,1,...,n-1$ and $m_l=-l,-l+1,...,l-1,l$? i.e. where do these ranges of values come from? (P.S. I know ...
0
votes
0answers
20 views

Cancelling waves and preservation of energy

In quantum physics, a particle is "defined" by a wavefunction. If you would take 2 particles with the same wavefunction, and negate one of them. They would cancel each other other out. Take for ...
1
vote
2answers
69 views

The observer experiment: quantum mechanics

If an observer is needed to see something, but it is an observer that causes a quantum wave function to "collapse" into a classical state, how could we tell that the quantum wave function even existed ...
9
votes
4answers
684 views

Is double-slit experiment dependent on rate at which electrons are fired at slit?

I am a mathematician and I am studying string theory. For this purpose I studied quantum theory. After reading Feynman's book in which he described the double-slit experiment (Young's experiment) I ...
1
vote
0answers
24 views

How is it possible to combine various techniques in cold atom experiments?

I’ve been reading about laser-trapped cold atoms (6Li in particular, which is a fermion) and was amazed at the number of things to keep track of in the experiments, just to gain that degree of control ...
4
votes
1answer
72 views

Does QFT prevent preparation of an entangled particle pair as in EPR experiment?

This is the claim Tommasini makes in Reality, Measurement and Locality in Quantum Field Theory:"Two spin $1/2$ particles, A and B, are created in coincidence in a spin-singlet state, and are detected ...
2
votes
1answer
93 views

Prove: $A$ and $B$ commute, therefore functions $f(A)$ and $g(B)$ will always commute with one another [closed]

How do I / can I actually prove the relationship $[a,b]=0 \Rightarrow [f(a),g(b)]=0$ for all functions $f,g$. I'm asking because the following sentence in the solution to my quantum mechanics ...
1
vote
0answers
85 views

How can all quantum measurement statistics be seen just as projective measurements on pure states?

Let $\rho$ be the density matrix for a system and let the POVMs be $\{E_m\}$ such that $\sum_i {E_m} = I$. The probability of getting the outcome $m$ is $\operatorname{Tr}(E_m \rho)$. The source I ...
-4
votes
0answers
32 views

Is communication of the wavefunction via quantum entanglement possible?

Assume two particles are entangled and separated by an arbitrary distance. Particle 1 is in a potential well of width w1. If I'm not mistaken, the wavefunction of Particle 2 correlates to the ...
0
votes
0answers
45 views

Why does not the bare interaction potential appear in the Bogoliubov theory?

They use some effective potential defined by the s-wave scattering length, but not the bare atom-atom interaction $V(r)$. Why? It is standard practice in second quantization to use the bare ...
0
votes
0answers
28 views

Solutions to time-independent Schrödinger's equation with symmetrical (even) potential [duplicate]

A problem from Griffith's Introduction to Quantum Mechanics asks to prove the following: Given a symmetric potential $V(x)$ $(=V(-x))$, the solutions to the time-independent Schrödinger's equation ...
2
votes
2answers
60 views

unitary transformation in quantum mechanics

What two arbitrary states in the same Hilbert space can be connected through an unitary transformation? And how to construct the unitary transformation? Whether is there a general answers for these ...
0
votes
5answers
158 views

Where does particle borrow energy from to tunnel?

Where does particle borrow energy from to tunnel? It is implied that particle can borrow energy and leaped over to the other side wherever that is, the shorter the gap the more energy it borrows my ...
0
votes
1answer
47 views

physical meaning of dimensionless parameter

What does it mean when there is nor not a dimensionless parameter in my model? In quantum harmonic oscillator, we don't have dimensionless parameter while in hydrogen atom case we have one which is ...
0
votes
0answers
28 views

Does the density of water ice (any form of water ice) near 0K exceed the density of water at 277.15K?

In a question brought up by my chemistry class, the most we have determined is that the stability of most forms of ice decreases as the temperature decreases. What does this loss of stability do to ...
2
votes
0answers
49 views

Maximizing particle annihilation of a certain particle type?

Is there any theoretical situation where one would be able to maximize the production of a certain type of particle? I wish to continue discussing this question: Where would dark matter be produced? ...
1
vote
1answer
60 views

What does a light wave look like (3d model)

What does a light wave look like? The only models I can seem to find online are 2D waves, they just look like sin() graphs. I have seen the models of the two components of "light waves" (electric ...
0
votes
0answers
17 views

Can the rate of branching in the many worlds interpretation be influenced?

If I understand correctly, in the many worlds interpretation, worlds branch when irreversible interactions occur, and that these interactions occur on very low-levels. Since they occur on such low ...
4
votes
0answers
34 views

Are (active vs. passive) and (covariant vs. contravariant) related?

I've only heard about the active/passive transformation distinction and the covariant/contravariant distinction in passing, but whenever I hear about both of them at the same time, people seem to say ...
-4
votes
1answer
65 views

Gluons and dark energy [closed]

According to my understanding, the dark energy is something that permeates spaces. The space in between the quantum particles(say like space between a nucleus and electrons, going even more deeper,i ...
3
votes
1answer
119 views

How is Lippmann-Schwinger equation derived?

I'd like to know the derivation of Lippmann-Schwinger equation (LSE) in operator formalism and on what assumptions it is based. I consulted the Ballentine book as advised in this Phys.SE post, but I ...
6
votes
1answer
76 views

7/2 versus 9/2 for diatomic heat capacity

Question I calculated the classical heat capacity of a diatomic gas as $C_V = (9/2)Nk_B$, however the accepted value is $C_V = (7/2)Nk_B$. I assumed the classical Hamiltonian of two identical atoms ...
0
votes
1answer
32 views

Simultaneous measurement for quantum entanglement

In the simple example that we measure the spin of two entangled particles, we measure one to have spin up so we know the other has spin down. If we could (theoretically) measure both particles at the ...
0
votes
2answers
77 views

Do black holes violate the Uncertainty Principle?

If black holes have mass but no size, does that imply zero uncertainty in position? If so, what does that imply for uncertainty in momentum?
3
votes
0answers
117 views

What is the Copenhagen interpretation of quantum field theory?

I am most interested in interpretational differences due to the fact that quantum field theory is relativistic while quantum mechanics is not. By "Copenhagen interpretation" I mean a minimal ...
1
vote
1answer
43 views

Quantum force and classical limit

Today my physicist friend told me about Bohmian mechanics as an alternative way of looking at QM. He told me that in Bohmian mechanics the wave function gives rise to another fundamental force (the ...
0
votes
0answers
28 views

Photon's behavior from 1-dimensional realm to 3-dimensional realm

I know that photon's behavior can be fully analyzed (or at least a solid theoretical explanation is present, see molecular QED book) when the photon is emitted and absorbed by same dimensional ...
0
votes
2answers
94 views

How does Lorentz invariance make $(\Psi_0,J_{\mu}\Psi_0)$ vanish?

Right before equation (10.4.7) in Weinberg's volume 1 on quantum field theory, he said $(\Psi_0,J_{\mu}\Psi_0)$ vanishes due to requirement of Lorentz invariance. As I understand, this term is a ...
0
votes
0answers
28 views

Weak measurement and weak value

The concept of weak measurements (and weak values) have become popular in Quantum information community, as I can see quite a few papers in arXiv. Since I am from Mathematical background (and the ...
6
votes
2answers
107 views

What state the wave function collapses into after an inaccurate measurement?

I'm watching MIT online lectures Quantum Physics I (roughly from one hour mark in the video). The lecturer explains wave functions that describe "Stationary States" that consist of a single energy ...
0
votes
1answer
25 views

Is there any restriction on the ability to measure the full quantum state of a system without inducing backaction?

Suppose an arbitrary quantum system is in the state $ \mid \Psi \rangle $, which may or may not be a function of time. An initially ignorant obsevrer would like to figure out what $ \mid \Psi ...
0
votes
0answers
15 views

Can we use Variational Monte Carlo for degenerate cases?

Consider Simple Example of Bose-Hubbard model $$H=-J\sum\limits_{<i,j>}b_i^{\dagger}b_j+h.c.+\frac{U}{2}\sum\limits_{i}n_i(n_i-1) . \tag{1}$$ We can solve this Hamiltonian by Variational ...
0
votes
1answer
47 views

Physical significance of momentum eigenfunction

In an introductory textbook of Quantum Mechanics, I found the momentum eigenfunction in position space to be given as Ne^ipx/h. Where N is the normalization factor and i is root of -1. I don't ...
0
votes
0answers
47 views

What is this normalization principle called in quantum mechanics?

I searched all over the web about this: $$\left|\Psi\right> = ...
-2
votes
0answers
16 views

Why is $|a,b>+ |-a,-b>$ annihilated by the ladder operator $E_{a,b}+ E_{-a,-b}$, but no other?

Ladder operators act on states $|a,b>$ by $$E_{c,d}|a,b> = |a+c,b+d> $$ Other possible ladder operators in my example are $E_{-a,b}$, $ E_{a,-b}$ or some linear combination of them. ...
0
votes
1answer
36 views

Why does a measurement on one qubit force another one into a given state in Simon's algorithm?

This comes from trying to understand the "Simon's algorithm". So we have a set of $2^n$ kets $|x_i >$ one each for $i \in \{0,1\}^n$. Each $x_j \in \{0,1\}^n$. And we have the further constraint ...
0
votes
1answer
42 views

Would infinite material cause a black hole?

If you have an infinite amount of any material(That doesn't have a critical mass to have nuclear reactions), would this matter form massive black holes that condense into an infinite black hole? Two ...
0
votes
1answer
44 views

Unitary change of X basis, shankar, quantum mechanics 7.4.9

I'm currently working through Shankar's Quantum Mechanics and am stuck on one of his exercises. In Exercise 7.4.9 Shankar would like us to show $$|\tilde{x}\rangle = \exp(ig(x)/\hbar) |x\rangle$$ ...
0
votes
1answer
30 views

How are resistivity and tunneling related?

If we consider a sandwich with three nanometric layers: conductor-insulator-conductor and apply voltage (lower than breakdown voltage) from both sides tunneling will occur. Is tunneling dependent on ...
1
vote
1answer
50 views

Angular Momentum Operators - Commutation Relations

I was going over past PGRE exam questions, and came across this one. The components for the angular momentum operator $\mathbf{L}=(L_x,L_y,L_z)$ satisfy the following commutation relations. ...
2
votes
0answers
60 views

About the definition of the spin current

People have been talking about the spin current for a while. But there is a fundamental problem. Unlike charge, or mass, spin is not conserved. Let us take the 1d spin-1/2 Heisenberg chain as an ...
12
votes
6answers
381 views

Has a double slit experiment ever been done using a track chamber or even contemplated?

I tried searches and the question has been posed in other fora, but no experiment came up. Track chambers (cloud chambers, bubble chambers , time projection chambers, solid state detectors like the ...
0
votes
1answer
59 views

Why do electrons occupy in discrete energy states?

Why can't there be any continuous energy band in an atom?
0
votes
1answer
56 views

Beam splitter in Q.M. and C.M. - Formalism

In Q.M. the beam splitter is represented by the Hadamard transform (at least if the particle is in a state $|\Psi \rangle = \left( \frac{1}{\sqrt2} \right )(|0\rangle + |1\rangle)$ ) The Hadamard ...
1
vote
0answers
59 views

Does Quantum Mechanics need imaginary numbers? [duplicate]

In quantum mechanics, we assume wavefunctions are complex valued, and that probability amplitudes are given by the modulus of the wavefunction squared. This formalism can correctly explain ...
1
vote
7answers
305 views

Quantization vs. continuous energy levels

I still don't get what it means for atomic energy levels to be continuous or quantitized (incontinuous). Clearing this up will really help me. Also, can anyone tell me why energy levels in solids are ...
0
votes
1answer
66 views

Negative sign in rotation operator again

In Wikipedia's page on the rotation operator, section "In relation to the orbital angular momentum", they write $$ R(z,t) = exp((-i/h) \varphi L_z) $$ where $\varphi$ is the angle being rotated ...
0
votes
1answer
28 views

Compton scattering's frequency paradox

In Compton scattering, the wavelength difference of scattered radiation is measured as, as well as calculated by conservation of momentum: $\lambda - \lambda'={\frac{h}{mc}} (1-cos\theta)$ where ...
1
vote
1answer
41 views

ideally accurate measurement

In the address below http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Measurement_in_quantum_mechanics it's written: For pedagogic reasons, the measurement [in quantum mechanics] is usually assumed to be ideally ...
-3
votes
1answer
58 views

Eigenstates of sum of creation and annihilation operators

Does the operator $a+a^\dagger$ have eigenstates? If yes, what are they?