Quantum mechanics describes the microscopic properties of nature in a regime where classical mechanics no longer applies. It explains phenomena such as the wave-particle duality, quantization of energy and the uncertainty principle and is generally used in single body systems. Use the ...

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88 views

When is quantum optics “correct”?

What is the regime under which we may consider quantum optics description of light a good approximation of a more correct theory such as QED? By quantum optics I mean describing the electromagnetic ...
2
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1answer
42 views

Why does the raising and lowering operator not affect total angular momentum?

My notes define: $$ L_{\pm} = L_{x} \pm i L_{y} $$ and states: $$ [L_{z},L_{\pm}] = \pm \hbar L_{\pm} $$ I'm fine with this as it's easy to show the result with some ugly algebra. It then says: ...
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1answer
70 views

Understanding the Particle Data Group review documents

Would someone mind outlining what each piece of semi-structured data means in these images taken of some PDG documents? As a newcomer it is very difficult to interpret the tables. tl;dr This ...
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2answers
961 views

How does an electron move around in an orbital? Is it “wave-like” or random?

When an electron is moving around in it's orbital, is it actually moving around like a wave, like this video shows? (By wave-like, I mean, the "electron" in this video is showing it following a ...
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4answers
144 views

How does the electron jump across “gaps” in its orbital?

I saw on perhaps COSMOS, and have heard mention from other professors, that electrons sort of "teleport" or something, in their orbital and the quantum level. So looking at the orbitals for a lone ...
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1answer
75 views

Coupled Quantum Harmonic Oscillator

Given the following Hamiltonian for two identical linear oscillators with spring constant $k$ and interaction potential $\alpha x_1x_2$; I was asked to find the expectation value $\langle ...
2
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1answer
40 views

Why is the full eigen function is product of eigen functions and not addition?

For example suppose there is a two electron system. Why is the full eigen function product of the spatial eigen function and spin wave function for the two electron system?
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0answers
55 views

Time and particles [closed]

What it is in basic particles that make them propagate themselves through time or, basically, what brings that property known as Duration in a particle (wave)? I sense that this is somehow is based ...
2
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1answer
108 views

Question about atom subshells

So my teacher told me that EACH shell contains 5 subshells (s, p, d, f, g) but what I don't understand is this The 1st shell has only 1 subshell (and not 5 like he said) and the number of ...
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2answers
33 views

Bound states, scattering states and infinite potentials

I am doing my first semester of Quantum Mechanics and we're using Griffith's Introduction to Quantum Mechanics. As he is introducing the Dirac delta function potential he explains bound and scattering ...
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1answer
42 views

Eigenfunctions for $1s$ hydrogen Schrodinger equation

I am a computer scientist and started my Phd in material science. The second course os my Phd is material simulation by computer. One the task is show the verification of the eigenfunction $1s$ from ...
2
votes
2answers
128 views

Is there any physical quantity that does not have uncertainty?

I saw this video and I got a thought: Is there any physical quantity that does not have uncertainty? Basic models are: for lenght for time end energy (so for mass too) and I realized that ...
2
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4answers
191 views

How did photons and electrons arise out of the quark-gluon plasma?

I am just beginning to learn about the ideas of the early universe, so this is probably a beginner question. I understand that protons and neutrons (which are baryons, which are hadrons) are made out ...
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0answers
26 views

Stimulated emission and coherence

For a significant part of my life I have been taught that, if a photon of the "correct" energy meets an excited atom, the atom will then (with a certain probability) undergo transition to a lower ...
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1answer
147 views

Directional derivatives in the multivariable Taylor expansion of the translation operator

Let $T_\epsilon=e^{i \mathbf{\epsilon} P/ \hbar}$ an operator. Show that $T_\epsilon\Psi(\mathbf r)=\Psi(\mathbf r + \mathbf \epsilon)$. Where $P=-i\hbar \nabla$. Here's what I've gotten: ...
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0answers
39 views

Simplest Hamiltonian for 2d wave equation with periodic boundary conditions

I want to use the 2d wave equation ($\frac{\partial^2u}{\partial t^2}=\frac{\partial^2u}{\partial x^2}+\frac{\partial^2u}{\partial y^2}$) with periodic boundary conditions as a simple toy model of a ...
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2answers
112 views

A question on quantum computing and de Broglie's pilot wave theory

I don't know much about quantum computing except what I have read about on wiki and popsci. I have been reading about the de Broglie-Bohm pilot wave theory and how they describe quantum mechanics in ...
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0answers
19 views

A question on quantum computing? [duplicate]

I dont know much about quantum computing except what i have read about on wiki and popsci. I have been reading about the de broglie-bohm pilot wave theory and how they describe quantum mechanics in ...
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0answers
55 views

Why is commutation relations the first step in quantization?

Why is commutation relations the first step in quantization?
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1answer
37 views

Can quanta have different energy levels? [closed]

The energy of a wave is h*f. How i imagine this is each cycle consisting of 1 quanta. I sometimes hear people say the energy of a photon is equal to h*f which makes it sound like each cycle has a ...
2
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4answers
130 views

Bond Angles - H2O vs CO2

H2O has a 109.5 degree bond angle, but CO2 has exactly 180 degrees. Is there a qualitative reason for this? It's hard to believe CO2 is exactly 180 degrees unless there were some symmetry, but the ...
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5answers
791 views

Is there a classical analog to quantum mechanical tunneling?

In comments to a Phys.SE question, it has been written: 'Tunneling' is perfectly real, even in classical physics. [...] For sufficiently large temperatures this can put the system above a hump in ...
2
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3answers
173 views

Why can't electrons fall into the nucleus?

I read a book on pop sci book on quantum mechanics and the author said that electrons do not fall into the nucleus due to quantum mechanics- which principles suggest this (I think it was Heisenberg's ...
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4answers
81 views

Virtual particles/quantum tunneling - conservation of energy?

I'm confused as to how the above phenomena can take place since arent they breaking the law of conservation of energy (even, if temporarily)?
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0answers
34 views

Definition of transmission and reflection probability

This is a basic question, but it does not seem to be well defined anywhere. Generally, two terms are mixed somewhat randomly: transmission PROBABILITY and transmission coefficient. So to be clear, ...
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2answers
52 views

Does a random local unitary destroy entanglement

There is a massive debate raging about whether the wavefunction is an aspect of reality or just a way of handling the data you have about a system. This question is in that vein. A local unitary on ...
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0answers
24 views

Quantum mechanics for macroscopic charges?

OK first off tell me if my understanding of the following is correct: In a Hydrogen atom, one would expect that the opposite charges (electron and nucleus) to attract each other, according to ...
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1answer
44 views

What is a virtual state?

In quantum mechanics / Raman spectroscopy, what is a virtual state? What is the difference between a virtual state and a superposition of states? Can you simply think of the virtual state as a ...
1
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1answer
55 views

How do you actually cool the atoms to create the Bose-Einstein Condensate?

What is the actual way you cool atoms to a low enough temperature that you can observe their quantum behavior at a macroscopic level, like in the Bose-Einstein Condensate? ...
1
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1answer
101 views

Creation and Annihilation Operators

Let $\widehat{a}^{+}_{i}$ and $\widehat{a}_{i}$ be the usual bosonic creation and annihilation operators. Consider $$\widehat{q}_{i} = \sqrt{\frac{\hbar}{2m_{i}w_{i}}}(\widehat{a}_{i}+ ...
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4answers
476 views

Quantum mechanics threshold

First of all I beg your forgiveness as I am not a physicist and the question I am going to ask may sound silly. I am aware that beyond a certain threshold in the hierarchy of building blocks of ...
1
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1answer
58 views

Formation of atoms question

Could you please, explain to me the logic of the folllowing process as you would do to your 8 y/o sister: Ubiquitousness and stability of atoms relies on their binding energy, which means that ...
1
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2answers
109 views

What is a measurement in MWI

I was reviewing the MWI, and couldn't figure what a measurement is in the MWI? Everett claims that split happens when you measure, but what is it for MWI (not for general QM)? Yes, I know about ...
0
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1answer
36 views

Probability to be in a particular state

If I have a wavefunction $\psi = \sum_{n=0}^{\infty} a_n e^{i \phi_n} | n \rangle$ and $(|n \rangle)$ is a set of orthonormal functions. Is it correct that the probability to be in a state $|k\rangle ...
2
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1answer
63 views

Two-Electron System

I'm reading the section "Two Electron System" in Sakurai's textbook and I'm stuck on the following reasoning: Let us now consider specifically a two-electron system. The eigenvalue of the ...
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0answers
53 views

How can I write a Gaussian state as a squeezed, displaced thermal state

I would like to write a Gaussian state with density matrix $\rho$ (single mode) as a squeezed, displaced thermal state: \begin{gather} \rho = \hat{S}(\zeta) \hat{D}(\alpha) \rho_{\bar{n}} ...
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2answers
51 views

How can we say that a wave function follows schrodinger equation using operators?

If I have an operator which has an eigenfunction which follows schrödinger's time-dependent equation , and I have another eigenfunction to this operator , can I say that even the other eigenfunction ...
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0answers
20 views

Asymptotics of the Wigner 6j Symbol

So, in doing some numerical computations in QFT, I've run into the following Wigner 6j-Symbol: $ \left\{ \begin{array}{ccc} x & J_1 & J_2 \\ \frac{N}{2} & \frac{N}{2} & \frac{N}{2} ...
2
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1answer
111 views

Was Max Born the first to notice a connection between quantum mechanics and randomness?

Max Born introduced the Born Rule in a paper from 1926. But was this really the first time that a connection between quantum mechanics and randomness was noticed? Today, quantum mechanics and ...
2
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2answers
155 views

QM interpretations

I don't fully appreciate what the discovery of the decoherence phenomenon adds to the Copenaghen interpretation of QM. I will be more precise: the Copenaghen interpretation, if I am not wrong, is ...
2
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1answer
64 views

Approach to expressing $|n\rangle\langle n| $ as a polynomial when eigenvalues are degenerate?

If ${|n\rangle}$ are eigenvectors of an operator $A$ then $|n\rangle\langle n| $ can be expressed in terms of a finite order polynomial $$|n\rangle\langle n| =\prod_{m\ne n} \frac{A-a_m}{a_n-a_m}$$ ...
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0answers
57 views

Dependence of sign on operators in wave equation?

In the time-dependent Schrödinger equation, our teacher told us about energy and momentum operators. He just defined them, the equation was of the form $A\exp(i(kx-\omega t))$, if we take the ...
1
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1answer
40 views

Thought Experiment: Force on magnets in a Stern Gerlach Experiment

Background: In the SG experiment, an inhomogenous magnetic field affects a force on particles passing between two magnets. "Measurement" takes place when a screen is placed on one end, blocking one ...
2
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1answer
60 views

Negative Solution for Dirac Equation

The negative solution for the Dirac equation predicted the existence of positron. Can anyone show that basic solution for this?
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2answers
50 views

Does the superposition principle affect the space of quantum states?

I am confused about the set of quantum states. I have seen it written that in classical physics, the set of all states is a simplex. (I think this refers to the probability simplex.) In quantum ...
1
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4answers
90 views

Are double-slit patterns really due to wave-like interference?

According to various sources on the web, it seems like the general concensus is that there isn't actually any wave-particle duality with quantum particles. For example, this article implies that ...
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0answers
40 views

The triangle inequality in CHSH derivation, where is the triangle?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CHSH_inequality#Bell.27s_1971_derivation ... |X + Y| <= |X| + |Y| ??? CHSH inequality is combined from four relative angles between four polarization axis which do ...
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2answers
51 views

How hot particles can get [duplicate]

One way in which an object is affected by temperature rise is that the wavelength of the radiation it emits is gets smaller and smaller. Another way of looking at it is that as an object gets hotter, ...
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0answers
55 views

What's the value of the coupling constant in interacting field theories?

Consider this Lagrangian : $L = \frac{1}{2}(\partial_\mu \Phi)^2 - \frac{M^2}{2}\Phi^2 +\frac{1}{2}(\partial_\mu \phi)^2 -\frac{m^2}{2} \phi^2 -\mu\Phi\phi^2$ Its interaction term is given by : ...
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1answer
316 views

Am I missing a trick to solving this differential equation?

I was playing around with a 3-D potential $V$ such that $V_{(r)} = 0$ for $r<a$, and $V_{(r)} = V_0$ otherwise. By using the Schrödinger Equation, I showed that: ...