Quantum mechanics describes the microscopic properties of nature in a regime where classical mechanics no longer applies. It explains phenomena such as the wave-particle duality, quantization of energy and the uncertainty principle and is generally used in single body systems. Use the ...

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22 views

Is it possible to change the direction or bend magnetic flux? [closed]

Is it possible to change the direction or bend the magnetic flux according to our wish? What i actually want to do is that if i have a horse-shoe magnet can i bend the magnetic flux which is running ...
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2answers
78 views

Electromagnetic wave and quantum mechanics [duplicate]

I'm very new to physics. I studied and read about quantum mechanics and what the assumptions are (wave particle duality, uncertainty principle, observation, wave function collapse, etc.), but I also ...
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1answer
72 views

Permutation symmetry - a continuous symmetry?

From quantum mechanics it is known that permutation between identical particles does not change the Hamiltonian. Assuming that the quantum system consists of a very high number of particles such that ...
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1answer
36 views

two qubits measurment [closed]

Let $$\text{qubit} = \sqrt{\frac{1}{6}} (i∣00\rangle + ∣10\rangle − 2 ∣11\rangle) \, .$$ I need to calculate the probability for each state while measuring both qubits in the standard basis. I did : ...
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1answer
37 views

Difference between scattering amplitude and scattering lenght

I'm studying neutron scattering theory and I noticed that one usually writes the scattered wave as a spherical wave: $$\psi \sim \frac{-b} {r}e^{ikr}$$ where $b$ is known as scattering lenght. From ...
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3answers
217 views

Reason for Uncertainty principle

$$\Delta x \Delta p_x \geq \frac{\hbar}{2} $$ I understand what does Heisenberg's uncertainty principle states i.e. it's definition and it has been proven experimentally. But, can anyone please ...
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1answer
54 views

Time is what keeps everything from appearing at once [closed]

This is a question about time. In this talk http://ed.ted.com/lessons/einstein-s-brilliant-mistake-entangled-states-chad-orzel Chad Orzel makes the point that if the same quantum experiment is ...
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58 views

Using the double slit experiment to prove or disprove the de Broglie-Bohm pilot wave theory

Probably a dumb question... If you have a double slit experiment with a second experiment (single or double slit) at 90 degrees intersecting the path of the first experiment, would the interference ...
2
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1answer
65 views

Why does circularly polarized light break time-reversal symmetry?

I've encountered some interesting paper on 2D materials where authors use circularly polarized light to break time-reversal symmetry to split energy levels. Here you can find the paper: ...
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1answer
35 views

Probability and double slit

if a beam of identical particles at random distances from each other (or exactly 1/2 lambda between each other) travelling with the same v towards a double sllit do not interfere with each others wave ...
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29 views

How should we deal with diagrams which do not conserve particle number in a non-relativistic field theory?

In the last 10 years there has been more and more crossover of techniques from high energy physics being used in AMO and condensed matter scenarios, in particular diagrammatic techniques and related ...
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1answer
55 views

Is there a mathematical relationship between Legendre conjugates and Fourier conjugates?

In quantum mechanics, there is an uncertainty principle between conjugate variables, giving rise to complementary descriptions of a quantum system. But the variables are conjugates in two different ...
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1answer
107 views

Why does temperature have no uncertainity?

Lets say I have an object A, with temperature $T$ and Hamiltonian $H_{A}$. Now take a thermometer B, with Hamiltonian $H_{B}$. Now when I put the thermometer in contact with A and do a measurement ...
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2answers
64 views

Does calculus work on the quantum scale [duplicate]

I have read somewhere that Leibniz championed the idea that the world is continuous as this was needed for his (or maybe Newtons) new invention (or discovery?) of calculus. But if I am not mistaken a ...
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2answers
845 views

Is there experimental verification of the s, p, d, f orbital shapes?

Have there been any experiments performed (or proposed) to prove that the shapes of the s,p,d,f orbitals correspond to our spatial reality as opposed to just being a figment of the mathematics that ...
2
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2answers
66 views

Can I apply $E=hf$ to a particle having mass?

I am reading concepts of modern physics (by Arthur Beiser) where he calculates the de Broglie wave velocity. For that he uses the relation $v = fλ$ where $v$, $f$, and $λ$ are velocity (de Broglie ...
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1answer
75 views

Does the randomness of QM do much in everyday life? How much? [closed]

My apologies if in its current state this question isn't squarely suited here; I've worked it until it seemed reasonably articulate. Feel free to move it if it'd be better received elsewhere. ...
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48 views

Are photons just electric waves in an electron's frame of reference?

They say that electrons emit photons when they jump to a lower orbit. But the way electrons should see it, there's no any emission, really. There's just rapid change in electric field due to a rapid ...
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3answers
94 views

Both Eigenvalues and Operators are “Observables”? [duplicate]

I am having a bit of difficulty wading through the what seems to be multiple usages for Observables in Quantum Mechanics. " Mathematically observables are postulated to be Hermitian operators.. " ...
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2answers
115 views

Faster-Than-Light Communication using Entangled Photons

Based on my understanding of the “Double-Slit Quantum Eraser Experiment”, documented here: http://grad.physics.sunysb.edu/~amarch/, it seems that Faster-Than-Light communication is possible. Of ...
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3answers
111 views

Why photons reflect off glass?

Why photon reflects and refracts through glass? Some photons pass through glass and some reflects.I know this is due to energy levels of electrons of glass, an incoming photon is unable to excite the ...
2
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1answer
78 views

Why isn't the time-derivative considered an operator in quantum mechanics? [duplicate]

Based on my understanding when doing quantum mechanics we deal with a small set of mathematical objects: namely scalars, kets, bras, and operators. But then in the Schrodinger equation we have this ...
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1answer
83 views

Is there a reason why a relativistic quantum theory of a single fermion exists, but of a single scalar not?

When we try to construct the relativistic generalization of non-relativistic time dependent Schroedinger equation, there are at least two possible completions - Klein-Gordon equation and Dirac ...
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2answers
71 views

What does it mean to observe? [duplicate]

This is a layman's question. The only thing I know about quantum physics is from casual reading and documentaries. I can imagine electrons being probabilistic waves. Their position is an infinite ...
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1answer
120 views

Can operators be argument of Dirac Delta function

In one part of Marc Bee's book on Quasielastic Neutron Scattering, he defines the pair correlation function $$ G(\textbf r,t) = \frac{1}{(2\pi)^3}\int I(\textbf Q,t)\text e^{-i\textbf Q.\textbf r}\ ...
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3answers
82 views

Does Bell's theorem exclude local hidden variables as explanation for radioactive decay?

Often it is said that Bell's theorem (and the observed violations thereof) rules out local hidden variable theories as the explanation for the seeming non-determinism found in quantum mechanics. I'm ...
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21 views

Mass, Spin, Internal Energy and 1-Particle States in Galilean Quantum Mechanics

I have been reading an article discussing the unitary representation of Galilean group and non-relativistic quantum mechanics. The link to the article is given below. http://arxiv.org/abs/1107.2442 ...
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31 views

$U(1)$ gauge symmetry in superfluid

The conventional superfluid phase in a Bose-Hubbard ground state has $U(1)$ symmetry. In the presence of spin-orbit coupling (SOC), the superfluid ground state has non-uniform phases. Why do people in ...
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2answers
75 views

Changing coordinates in partial derivatives, re: Hydrogen atom

At around 11:35 in this video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q99ygFeWGv4 the instructor is using a "standard way of changing coordinates" in partial derivatives relating to the new variables of ...
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33 views

How to arrive on the diffraction pattern for the double slit experiment using path integrals for the Gaussian slit case?

I wish to take the path integral route to derive the diffraction pattern for the double slit experiment using the Gaussian slits as the nature of the slits. The kernel looks like: \begin{equation} ...
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1answer
64 views

Can the wall in the double-slit experiment be considered to perform a “half measurement”?

When talking about the double-slit experiment, most physics books consider the wall to be a infinitely high potential, so that the photon is either reflected or transmitted through one of the slits. ...
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1answer
58 views

How would the frequency of particle spin be estimated if it really was rotation?

I understand from reading that particle spin is not real spin as the globe spins. from what I have read particle spin came about because of the magnetic field of a particle. If I understand the text ...
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1answer
49 views

Eigenstates of a harmonic oscillator

Using ladder operators, I can find eigenstates $\psi_n$ with eigenenergies $$E_n=\hbar\omega\left(n+\frac{1}{2}\right). $$ In my textbook, ladder operators work like $$ a\psi_n = c_n \psi_{n-1}$$ $$ ...
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2answers
60 views

Photon Absorption vs. Photoelectric Effect

USually, photons are absorbed by substances only if their energies coincide with the orbital transitions of that particle. However, in the photoelectric effect, it seems that you can take the energy ...
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44 views

Evolution of a 'state' in the Heisenberg picture

Suppose that we have a Hamiltonian, $\hat{H}$, and an operator $\hat{A}$ which satisfies the Heisenberg equation$^{[a]}$ $$i \frac{d}{dt} \hat{A} = [\hat{A},\hat{H}].$$ Can we create a 'state' by ...
2
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1answer
63 views

Schrodinger equation contains two pieces of information?

I've read that Schrödinger equation contains two pieces of information: about amplitudes and about phases. I know continuity eqn. for probability which is nice expression of former. I wanted to ...
1
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1answer
31 views

Mean squared velocity of a particle moving in a logarithmic potential [closed]

A particle of mass $m$ moves in the logarithmic potential $V(r)= C\ln(ar)$. $C$ and $a$ are constants. What is the mean squared velocity of the particle? Do I have to solve this in ...
0
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1answer
42 views

Find the expression of $j_+$ and $j_-$operators [closed]

I have just started to do exercises about quantum mechanics and I have some difficulties. I have a particle with spin $j=1$ and the Hamiltonian is $H=\gamma(j_xj_y+j_y j_x)$ (where $\gamma$ is a ...
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39 views

Is the connection of two spin-zero projectors with a singlet again a projector?

Let me pose a question that popped up in my research. Consider a square lattice, where each of the lattice sites is associated to 4 spin 1/2 particles. Now let the single-site projector $P_{(1,1)}$ be ...
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1answer
54 views

What is the relationship between quantum physics and chaos theory?

I am not a physicist, I am looking for a non-technical explanation. Articles such as this one seem to hint at the fact that "macro reality" regulated by classical mechanics is somehow a pattern ...
1
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1answer
74 views

Width of a 1 dimensional box with same ground state energy as hydrogen atom [closed]

I am trying to find the width $L$ of a one-dimensional box for which the ground state energy of an electron in the box equals the absolute value of the ground state of a hydrogen atom. No ...
0
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2answers
66 views

How can a solution of the time-independent Schrödinger equation evolve in space?

I understand that if the Hamiltonian does not depend on the time, the Schrödinger Equation becomes separable, so you get $$ H \psi(x) = E \psi(x) $$ and $$ \Psi(x,t) = ...
1
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1answer
27 views

Mass eigenstates and occupied physical volume?

I recently read about atom lasers and it made me wonder about something I recalled from my limited experience with quantum (two undergraduate and two graduate level classes). I recall that some ...
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1answer
67 views

No two identical fermions can have the same quantum state at once?

This is the Pauli Exclusion Principle, but I have a question about it... It states that no two identical fermions can have the same quantum state, but what about different fermions having the same ...
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0answers
18 views

Ramsey pulse versus optical pumping: what's the difference?

A Ramsey pulse is a coherent process, where the electronic states of for example an ion (or some other two-level-system) are coupled to a laser field. By tuning the laser precisely, we can coherently ...
1
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1answer
36 views

Potential energy function for high energy continuum?

For the hydrogen atom the quantised energy levels are: $$E_n = \frac{- 13.6 eV}{n^2}\quad\text{with}\quad n = 1,2,3...$$ One peculiar property of this quantisation is that for large $n$ the energy ...
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1answer
66 views

Can't a hydrogen electron have net positive energy?

This page http://www.physicspages.com/2011/06/07/hydrogen-atom-series-solution/ is the 2nd half of a solution to the hydrogen atom Schrödinger equation. They derive that $E = -1/n^2 *$ (bunch of ...
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1answer
96 views

Definition of probablity current in dirac space not including spatial dimension?

I'm currently reviewing (basic) relativistic quantum mechanics and stumbled upon the probability current in "dirac space", defined as $j^μ = (j^0,\vec j)^\mathrm T$ with $j^0 = c\,ρ = c\,ψ^+ψ$ and ...
5
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1answer
68 views

Can Schroedinger equation be derived from the unitary representation of Galilean group?

I have been trying to understand quantum mechanics as a unitary representation of spacetime symmetries. My first question is: Can Schroedinger equation be derived from the unitary representation of ...
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1answer
84 views

Derivation of time-dependent Schrödinger equation from De Broglie hypothesis

In a quantum mechanics script I'm reading, the Schrödinger equation is "derived" (more precisely, motivated) by the De Broglie hypothesis. It starts at $$ \lambda = \frac{2\pi h}{p} $$ $$ \omega = ...