Quantum mechanics describes the microscopic properties of nature in a regime where classical mechanics no longer applies. It explains phenomena such as the wave-particle duality, quantization of energy and the uncertainty principle and is generally used in single body systems. Use the ...

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Does $\sigma_x\sigma_p = 0 \cdot \infty$ after a measurement of particle position?

I feel this question has an obvious answer that I should have been able to find independently, but I've searched for a while now it hasn't clicked. When position is measured, the uncertainty of the ...
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1answer
186 views

Understanding the Particle Data Group review documents

Would someone mind outlining what each piece of semi-structured data means in these images taken of some PDG documents? As a newcomer it is very difficult to interpret the tables. tl;dr This ...
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1answer
194 views

Does electromagnetic field collapse the wave function of charged particles?

In an electron double slit experiment, let's put two charged plates behind the slits in an attempt to move the pattern up and down on the the screen. What will happen? Will it just shift the ...
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1answer
231 views

Is this a photograph of an electron-positron annihilation? [closed]

With degrees in Mechanical and Electrical engineering but no advanced education in physics, I submit a query based on ellipsometric macro photography of TEMS supplied by FDA/NIH. In one TEM a ...
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1answer
522 views

Confused by Many-Body Formalism: Creation/Annihilation to Field Operators

I'm going through an introduction to many-body theory and I am getting tripped up on the formalism. I understand quantities such as $\hat {N} = ...
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1answer
629 views

Questions about angular momentum and 3-dimensional(3D) space?

Q1: As we know, in classical mechanics(CM), according to Noether's theorem, there is always one conserved quantity corresponding to one particular symmetry. Now consider a classical system in a $n$ ...
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1answer
371 views

Is momentum still conserved in non-phase-matched nonlinear optical processes?

To be efficient, a phase-matching condition has to be fulfilled in many nonlinear optical processes. For instance, the phase-matching requirement for second-harmonic generation is ...
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2answers
1k views

Zero point fluctuation of an harmonic oscillator

In a paper, I ran into the following definition of the zero point fluctuation of our favorite toy, the harmonic oscillator: $$x_{ZPF} = \sqrt{\frac{\hbar}{2m\Omega}} $$ where m is its mass and ...
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2answers
545 views

Has BCS Cooper pair condensate been observed in experiment?

Feshbach resonance in s-wave scattering states a BCS Cooper pair condensation at B-field just above the resonance where the scattering length a <0. Just wondering if the condensation has been ...
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484 views

Extending the idea of superdense coding

I was reading through the superdense coding protocol, that lets A convey two classical bits to B by sending one qubit (assuming B sends A a qubit beforehand). So B creates a 2-qubit state and sends ...
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2answers
689 views

Shor's algorithm and Bohmian Mechanics

Do quantum computer's tell us anything about the foundations of quantum theory? In particular Shor argued in the famous thread by 't Hooft Why do people categorically dismiss some simple quantum ...
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1answer
226 views

Eigenvalue of $L_z$

In section 4.3 of Griffths' "Introduction to Quantum Mechanics", just below Figure 4.6, the sentence begins Let $\hbar \ell$ be the eigenvalue of $L_z$ at this top rung... Why is this valid? ...
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272 views

Uniqueness of eigenvector representation in a complete set of compatible observables [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Uniqueness of eigenvector representation in a complete set of compatible observables Sakurai states that if we have a complete, maximal set of compatible observables, ...
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800 views

Again about all-win lottery

I suggest the following thought experiment that describes a machine which makes everybody happy. Suppose a lottery is conducted. The winner is awarded a billion dollars plus the title of eternal ...
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2answers
936 views

Use of Operators in Quantum Mechanics

I understand the form of operators in use for quantum mechanics such as the momentum operator: $$\hat{\text{P}}=-ih\frac{d}{dx}$$ My question is in what ways can I use it and what am I getting back? ...
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1answer
267 views

Young's double slit

Am I right to think the (general) probability distribution of photon in a double slit experiment at the screen has the form $|\psi|^2 = c e^{\alpha x^2}\cos^2(\beta x)$? (Due to the superposition of ...
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1answer
203 views

Products of Gaussian stochastic process variables

In the classic experimental physics text "Statistical Theory of Signal Detection" by Carl. W. Helstrom, Chapter II, section 4 concerns Gaussian Stochastic Processes. Such a process is observed at ...
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2answers
4k views

Quantum momentum (De Broglie)

The de broglie hypothesis suggests a particle can be associated with a wave of momentum $p = \hbar k$ my question is the following: how does one arrive at this concept of the momentum of a wave? I ...
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3answers
856 views

Historical background of wave function collapse

I wonder what were the main experiments that led people to develop the concept of wave function collapse? (I think I am correct in including the Born Rule within the general umbrella of the collapse ...
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2answers
6k views

Zero probability of finding an electron in the nucleus

One and the same electron in a p orbital and taking part in a common π (pi) bond has two lobes visualized as connecting through the nucleus. There is however zero probability of finding an electron at ...
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1answer
221 views

Beyond the gravity of a black hole

http://www.sciencealert.com/the-magnetic-field-just-outside-our-black-hole-has-been-studied-for-the-first-time reported strong magnetic fields escape out of black holes. Does that rule out photons ...
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77 views

How does one compute the state of a quantum system following imperfect measurement?

Suppose I have a quantum system $S$ ("system") with Hamiltonian $H_S$ and initial density matrix $\rho_S(0)$. I allow $S$ to interact with another system $P$ ("probe"), which has Hamiltonian $H_P$ and ...
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1answer
56 views

Are stationary quantum states attractors?

While explaining the quantum adiabatic theorem recently, I appealed to a thermodynamic analogy: when slowly contracting the walls containing a classical gas, the relaxation timescale can be taken to ...
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3answers
162 views

Seemingly a paradox on the eigenstate thermalization hypothesis (ETH)

In the research field of Many-body Localization (MBL), people are always talking about the eigenstate thermalization hypothesis (ETH). ETH asserts that for a isolated quantum system, all many-body ...
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2answers
384 views

Why does the magnitude squared of the wave function give us the probability density? [duplicate]

My question doesn't go much beyond the title: Why does $$\left | \psi \left ( x,t \right ) \right |^{2}$$ give us the probability density of something appearing at a certain location? I understand ...
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198 views

Where does an LED use energy other than emitting light?

I have a quantum formula describing what kind of photon should be emitted by an LED depending on its voltage. Of course the colour is depending on the material, but every type of LED also needs its ...
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1answer
82 views

Why do electrons in a superconductor lack energy to produce “massive” photons

My two questions are based around looking for a good, simple (if possible) explanation of the Cooper pair effect in superconductors. I follow the idea that, in intuitive terms, "a Cooper Pair" ...
3
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1answer
166 views

Are Forces Involved Non-Local?

Below is a copy of a answer given to this Phys.SE question asked previously: Does every material thing just consist in forces? In short, assume that we have two labs A and B, in each one there is ...
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128 views

Why is the “complete metric space” property of Hilbert spaces needed in quantum mechanics?

I have been learning more about Hilbert spaces in an effort to better understand quantum mechanics. Most of the properties of Hilbert spaces seem useful (e.g. vector space, inner product, complex ...
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1answer
356 views

Size of positronium

Positronium consists of an electron and a positron. By what factor is a positronium atom bigger than a hydrogen atom? The solution has been explained to me. The characteristic length when solving ...
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1answer
176 views

Why according to Hund's first rule all electron with same spin should occupy orbitals when partially filling?

I get that because of coulomb repulsion initially all the electrons will not occupy the same site but will single occupy the orbitals.But while doing so how do they know to keep their spins aligned ...
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87 views

Tunneling from Dirac material into Schrodinger material?

When a Dirac material, like graphene or TI, has a connection with a normal metal which Schrodinger equation govern on their carriers, how could we manipulate the tunneling of electron from Dirac side ...
3
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2answers
238 views

What is the analogy of $|x\rangle$ in quantum field theory?

Let me start from path integral formulation in quantum mechanics and quantum field theory. In QM, we have $$ U(x_b,x_a;T) = \langle x_b | U(T) |x_a \rangle= \int \mathcal{D}q e^{iS} \tag{1} $$ ...
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Is there any relation between Planck constant and Gravitational constant?

Why is the Gravitational constant about $10^{23}$ times of the Planck constant in SI-units? Is there any relation between them? I mean Planck constant is about $6.6\times 10^{-34}$ $Js$ and ...
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228 views

Free-particle solution to Schrödinger Equation

The free particle solution in stationary state (with definite energy) to the Schrödinger equation is $$\psi(x,t) =Ae^{i(kx-\omega t)} + Be^{-i(kx+\omega t)}$$ Since the energy is definite, and ...
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1answer
1k views

Fermi-Dirac distribution derivation?

I am trying to derive the Fermi-Dirac statistics using density matrix formalism. I know that $$<A>= Tr \rho A.$$ So I started from $$<n(\epsilon_i)>= Tr \rho n(\epsilon_i)=\frac {1}{Z} ...
3
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1answer
104 views

Differential Realizations of certain algebras

I'm a first year graduate student in Mathematical Physics, and I am trying to generalise a certain method involving the so-called "Differential realizations" of certain algebras. The problem I'm ...
3
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3answers
122 views

At what point is the spin determined in a Stern-Gerlach Apparatus

Consider a particle with spin that travels through a Stern Gerlach box (SGB), which projects the particle’s spin onto one of the eigenstates in the $z$-direction. The SGB defines separate trajectories ...
3
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1answer
405 views

Estimating minimum energy with uncertainty principle

I'm currently trying to solve a problem that involves estimating the minimum energy of a particle in the potential: $$ V(x) = \frac{-V_0a}{|{x}|} $$ I'm quite confused about how to handle the ...
3
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1answer
1k views

Hamiltonian matrix off diagonal elements?

I'm trying to understand how Hamiltonian matrices are built for optical applications. In the excerpts below, from the book "Optically polarized atoms: understanding light-atom interaction", what I ...
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2answers
646 views

Proton-proton bound state

There is something unclear for me. We say that the deuterium is a proton-neutron bound state of orbital angular momentum L=0 and of total spin S=1. I don't understand why can't we build such a state ...
3
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2answers
694 views

Second order degenerate perturbation theory

What is a good resource to learn about higher degree degenerate perturbation theory - one that involves mathematics that isn't much more advanced than first order perturbation theory? I've looked ...
3
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1answer
404 views

Minus Sign in Feynman Diagram

I've been reading these notes and I can't figure out the why on P.120, it is said that The fermionic statistics mean that the first diagram has an extra minus sign relative to the ψψ scattering ...
3
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2answers
485 views

Physical intepretation of nodes in quantum mechanics

I am taking my second course in QM, and my head is starting to spin as it probably should. But I would very much like to clear up my head about a few details regarding the wave function. As I know it ...
3
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3answers
288 views

Why does a force field leave the momentum operator unchanged in the Schrödinger equation?

The reasoning leading to the Schrödinger equation goes as follows: A plane wave in empty space has the following form: $$\psi = e^{i(kx-\omega t)}$$ Einstein had previously explained the ...
3
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2answers
539 views

Tensor Product of Hilbert spaces

This question is regarding a definition of Tensor product of Hilbert spaces that I found in Wald's book on QFT in curved space time. Let's first get some notation straight. Let $(V,+,*)$ denote a set ...
3
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1answer
1k views

Solving a time independent Schrödinger equation with a given potential

I'm trying to rework this old homework problem, and I am having problems arriving at the same solution on the answer sheet: Let $$V(x)=\begin{cases}\infty &\text{ if } x < 0\\ ...
3
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1answer
182 views

Path integral formulation understanding [duplicate]

I have done basic quantum mechanics and now I want to do the path integral formulation. I find Feynman's book Path Integrals in Quantum Mechanics difficult. Is there an easier alternative?
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1answer
821 views

Schrödinger equation for a harmonic oscillator

I have came across this equation for quantum harmonic oscillator $$ W \psi = - \frac{\hbar^2}{2m}\frac{d^2\psi}{dx^2} + \frac{1}{2} m \omega^2 x^2 \psi $$ which is often remodelled by defining a new ...