Quantum mechanics describes the microscopic properties of nature in a regime where classical mechanics no longer applies. It explains phenomena such as the wave-particle duality, quantization of energy and the uncertainty principle and is generally used in single body systems. Use the quantum-field-...

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463 views

Is that true that real quantum chaos doesn't exist?

I read several books and papers on quantum chaos, to my understanding they all emphases that the quantum chaos does not really exist because the linearity of the Schrodinger equation. Some works were ...
3
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1answer
509 views

What conservation law corresponds to this local $U(1)$ symmetry of the CCR?

It is known that canonical commutation relations do not fix the form of momentum operator. That means that if canonical commutation relations (CCR) are given by $$[\hat{x}^i,\hat{p}_j]~=~i\hbar~\...
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1answer
709 views

Does this experiment on wave-particle duality and complementarity disprove quantum mechanics and prove the EPR viewpoint on it?

I recently read Photons act like they go through two paths, even when we know which they took, at Ars Technica, which reports on the paper Wave-particle dualism and complementarity unraveled ...
2
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2answers
545 views

In Dirac notation, what do the subscripts represent? (Solution for particle in a box in mind)

So the set of solutions for the particle in a box is given by $$\psi_n(x) = \sqrt{\frac{2}{L}}\sin(\frac{n\pi x}{L}).$$ In Dirac notation $<\psi_i|\psi_j>=\delta_{ij}$ assuming $|\psi_i>$ ...
3
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1answer
2k views

three-particle quantum entanglement

So I know that two particles can be entangled in a quantum way, but is it possible that more than two particles be entangled in a quantum way? Most descriptions provide with two-particles cases, so I ...
2
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0answers
190 views

How to make DIY flight detector for double slit experiment?

I want to reproduce double slit experiment. So, is it possible to build flight detector (situated near one slit) at home? Is it possible to buy it somewhere?
2
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1answer
95 views

In the expansion of the scattered wave function, why do these two functions have the same index?

See Griffiths Quantum Mechanics, eq. 11.21. Evidently, $$\psi(r,\theta,\phi)=Ae^{ikz}+A\sum\limits_{l,m}^{\infty}C_{l,m}h_{l}(kr)Y_{l}^{m}(\theta,\phi).$$ But I don't see why the $l$th Hankel function ...
6
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3answers
593 views

Could quantum mechanics work without the Born rule?

Slightly inspired by this question about the historical origins of the Born rule, I wondered whether quantum mechanics could still work without the Born rule. I realize it's one of the most ...
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3answers
1k views

Normalisation factor $\psi_0$ for wave function $\psi = \psi_0 \sin(kx-\omega t)$

I know that if I integrate probabilitlity $|\psi|^2$ over a whole volume $V$ I am supposed to get 1. This equation describes this. $$\int \limits^{}_{V} \left|\psi \right|^2 \, \textrm{d} V = 1\\$$ ...
7
votes
3answers
517 views

Quantum Entanglement Versus Inflation in the Early Universe?

Quantum entanglement is one of the most fascinating and mysterious phenomena in nature. It needs no interactions, or any sort of exchange for it to take place. It is possible, not against any rules of ...
2
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1answer
2k views

How is quantum tunneling possible?

How is quantum tunneling possible? According to quantum mechanics, each particle is represented by a probability density function. This function must be continuous, and therefore when we look at a ...
2
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1answer
409 views

Is the following a simpler viable alternative to Feynman's interpretation of the double slit experiment

Feynman suggested that there is an infinity of trajectories for a single electron travelling from the source to the phosphorescent screen. He said that one electron goes through both holes (Fig 4.10, ...
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2answers
1k views

Is the uncertainty principle just saying something about what an observer can know or is it a fundamental property of nature?

I ask this question because I have read two different quotes on the uncertainty principle that don't seem to match very well. There are similar questions around here but I would like an explanation ...
10
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1answer
1k views

“An operator is hermitian”. Implications?

Alastair Rae states that there are 4 postulates of Quantum Mechanics in his text on the subject matter. The first part of his second postulate can be stated as: Every dynamical variable may be ...
5
votes
2answers
578 views

Technical detail in the solution of the hydrogen atom

I'm trying to do an exercise in which you solve the Schrödinger equation for the hydrogen atom. Through the exercise, I've already shown that the wavefunction is: $$ \psi_{n\ell m}(r,\theta,\varphi) =...
3
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3answers
856 views

Is velocity quantized?

If velocity is not quantized, then do moving objects have 'infinitely decimal place' velocities which we just can't measure to infinite decimal places? From my understanding the quantization of ...
-2
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1answer
350 views

Creation and Annihilation operator [closed]

In this page I want to know, why the equation (1.32) introduced creation and annihilation operator. Please elaborate.
1
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1answer
460 views

Shift operator (integral calculus involving Hermite polynomials) [closed]

I didn't know whether to pose this question on Physics.stackexchange or Math.stackexchange. But since this is the last step of a development involving the eigenfunctions of an Harmonic oscillator and ...
15
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3answers
15k views

Is it possible to reproduce Double-slit experiment by myself at home?

I want to reproduce this experiment by myself. What I need for this. What parameters of slits and laser/another light source it needs? Is it possible to make DIY-detector?
0
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2answers
340 views

Difficulties with bra and ket notation

I have problem in understanding equation (1.23), I croped this image from Mark_Srednicki "Quantum field theory". Can anyone show me the reason for the equation (1.23)?
15
votes
4answers
437 views

Comments on entropy and the direction of time in Landau and Lifshitz's Statistical Mechanics

In Landau and Lifshitz's Stat Mech Volume I is the comment: However, despite this symmetry, quantum mechanics does in fact involve an important non-equivalence of the two directions of time. ...
2
votes
1answer
398 views

Usage of Schrödinger equation vs Madelung equations

It is well known that Madelung formulation is alternative to the Schrödinger Formulation, cf. this previous Madelung transformation Phys.SE post. I wanted to know what makes Schrödinger's formulation ...
4
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1answer
897 views

Industry application of computational quantum mechanics?

I was wondering if anybody knew of an industry application of computational quantum mechanics. For example, the efficient placement of circuit elements on a PCB is in part motivated by classical FDTD ...
5
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1answer
1k views

How to evaluate spin operators in second quantization for spin symmetry-broken Slater determinants?

Suppose we have the following Slater determinant: \begin{equation} | \Psi \rangle = \prod \limits_{i,i'} a^+_{i\alpha} a^+_{i'\beta} | \rangle \end{equation} where $a^+_{i\alpha}$ creates an electron ...
3
votes
1answer
370 views

What is the height of the electron orbits of an atom?

What are the heights of the electron orbits of an atom? (How far apart are the energy levels of the electron relative to the center of the atomic nucleus?) How fast do electrons move in their orbits?
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1answer
123 views

NMR rotating frame

I'm reading about a linearly polarized field (in the context of NMR). The field is given by $$ {\bf H_{lin}}=2H_1({\bf i}cos(\omega_zt)).$$ This can be created by having a pulse field plus its ...
0
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1answer
155 views

Young experiment: square of classical real wave function

I can't understand why the sum of two real waves result in a time dependent wave, but not so for the complex waves. In details, I can't get this passage on p.38-39 in A.C. Phillips, Introduction to ...
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2answers
350 views

Is there anything wrong with the cybernetic interpretation of quantum mechanics by Ross Rhodes?

The interpretation is outlined here It certainly gives a good logical explanation of most quantum oddities.
0
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2answers
259 views

What will happen if a ground state hydrogen atom is placed in a low frequency, but high intensity laser field?

Similar questions have been asked before, but this one extends the scope of interpretation and applications. Let us ask the question: What will happen if we have a laser gun that produces a high ...
39
votes
8answers
7k views

What is $\Delta t$ in the time-energy uncertainty principle?

In non-relativistic QM, the $\Delta E$ in the time-energy uncertainty principle is the limiting standard deviation of the set of energy measurements of $n$ identically prepared systems as $n$ goes to ...
2
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2answers
2k views

Changes in Water Bonding Angle

I heard something recently in a casual discussion, but have yet to be able to confirm it: is there any evidence that the bonding angle for a water molecule, currently defined as 104.5, has been either ...
3
votes
1answer
3k views

What happens if an atom absorbs a photon of energy higher than first excited state but lower than second excited state? [duplicate]

Since the energy levels of atoms are quantized, I was wondering what happens if an electron is hit by a photon whose energy is higher than electron's first excited state but lower than second excited ...
5
votes
1answer
149 views

Tracing out an observable vs integrating over unitaries

Let $O$ be an observable on a Hilbert space $\mathcal{H}$, and let $B$ be a subset of the spins composing $\mathcal{H}$, and let $\bar{B}$ be its complement. Now define $\displaystyle O_B = \frac{1}{\...
9
votes
1answer
472 views

How fat is Feynman’s photon?

According to my calculations, it is a lot skinnier than Airy’s photon, but still a whole lot fatter than a straight line. So, how does a photon get from point A to Point B? The ray optics ...
1
vote
1answer
126 views

Photon indistinguishability and beam splitters

$\newcommand{\bra}[1]{\left\langle#1\right|}$ $\newcommand{\ket}[1]{\left|#1\right\rangle}$ Suppose I have a beam splitter that will either reflect a photon by 45 degrees, or will allow the photon to ...
5
votes
2answers
3k views

Pauli matrix rotations

When doing physics with two-level systems and introducing rotations, a term that appears quite often is the rotation of a Pauli matrix by another one: $$e^{- i \sigma_j \theta/2} \sigma_k e^{i \...
5
votes
5answers
8k views

Confused over complex representation of the wave

My quantum mechanics textbook says that the following is a representation of a wave traveling in the +$x$ direction:$$\Psi(x,t)=Ae^{i\left(kx-\omega t\right)}\tag1$$ I'm having trouble visualizing ...
10
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1answer
384 views

Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Conceptual Questions

Let $M$ be the magnetic moment of a system. Below are the Bloch equations, including the relaxation terms. $$\frac{\partial M_x}{\partial t}=({\bf M} \times \gamma {\bf H_0})_x-\frac{M_x}{T_2} $$ $$...
5
votes
3answers
1k views

Particle coming across a step potential barrier

My quantum mechanics textbook says that when a particle (in the classical case) comes across a potential-step barrier of finite height, if it has sufficient energy to surmount the barrier, it will ...
1
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1answer
154 views

Constant-dependent potential in radial Schrodinger equation

Studying quantum mechanics, I've found an exercise I don't know how to solve it. Given the radial Schrödinger equation, $$\left [ \frac{d^2}{dr^2}+k^2-\frac{2m}{\hbar^2}\lambda U\left ( r \right ) \...
1
vote
1answer
465 views

What's the average position of oscillating particles in a box with periodic boundary conditions?

Imagine an open box repeating itself in a way that a if a particle crossing one of the box boundary is "teleported" on the opposite boundary (typical periodic boundary position in 3D). Now put a ...
0
votes
1answer
305 views

Quantum entanglement, quantum measurement, spin and position

By uncertainty principle, we know that determining particle's position at some location is limited. So we cannot determine the position of a particle at some exact point location as this would make ...
9
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1answer
839 views

Has The Aharonov-Bohm Effect Been Experimentally Proven?

I have encountered two contradicting papers on the Aharonov-Bohm Effect: One supporting, The Aharonov-Bohm Effects: Variations on a Subtle Theme. H Batelaan and A Tonomura. Physics Today 62 pp. 38-...
0
votes
1answer
783 views

Solving the 1-D Schrodinger equation for a free particle: Confused about 2 possible general solutions

I am following Griffiths' Introduction to Quantum Mechanics, as well as an online lecture that follows a different book, and both sources give different equations for the general solution of the 1-D ...
1
vote
2answers
132 views

Given a state function of a particle, can we determine its mass?

The quantum state of a system is supposed to contain all the information that can be obtained about the system such as its energy, momentum...etc. So I have 2 questions: 1-If someone gave us a ...
1
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1answer
646 views

Quantum Ripples?

Would someone please explain what quantum ripples are? I've heard of gravitational waves, are they the same thing? I overheard someone saying that it could allow for possible faster than light speed ...
3
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2answers
644 views

How do particles, such as electrons become visible?

Quantum mechanics says that atoms are invisible - they do not have some specified location, only a probability distribution. So, how can we see them? If there is to be particle-antiparticle ...
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1answer
130 views

Data For Quantum Entanglement

Is there any publicly accessible data that shows quantum entanglement empirically. I want to see what these researches are seeing that is showing them that indeed this phenomenon is real. Also, any ...
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2answers
1k views

Amplitude of Probability amplitude. Which one is it?

QM begins with a Born's rule which states that probability $P$ is equal to a modulus square of probability amplitude $\psi$: $$P = \left|\psi\right|^2.$$ If I write down a wave function like this $\...
2
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0answers
328 views

Probability and probability amplitude [duplicate]

What made scientists believe that we should calculate probability $P$ as the $P = \left|\psi\right|^2$ in quantum mechanics? Was it the double slit experiment? How? Is there anywhere in the ...