Quantum mechanics describes the microscopic properties of nature in a regime where classical mechanics no longer applies. It explains phenomena such as the wave-particle duality, quantization of energy and the uncertainty principle and is generally used in single body systems. Use the ...

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Matrix order in Dirac equations

The trace of matrix is always sum of its eigen values , which can be seen if $\hat{U}$ transforms the matrix $\alpha_i$ into it's diagonal form . $$ \begin{pmatrix} A_1 & 0 & \cdots & 0 ...
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2answers
354 views

when photons can be trapped in a cavity and manipulated. How they can be observed without being destroyed?

An observer is anything that can cause a wave function to collapse. That is an interpretation of wave function collapse (usually referred to as the measurement problem). Now, when can photons be ...
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3answers
700 views

Disproving a refutation of quantum mechanics (QM) via a calculation of the ground state of the helium atom

This website http://www7b.biglobe.ne.jp/~kcy05t/ appears to refute Quantum mechanics using some proof. An important paper involved is this 'Calculation of Helium Ground State Energy by Bohr's ...
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3answers
673 views

Propagators and Probabilities in the Heisenberg Picture

I'm trying to understand why $$\Bigl|\langle0|\phi(x)\phi(y)|0\rangle\Bigr|^2$$ is the probability for a particle created at $y$ to propagate to $x$ where $\phi$ is the Klein-Gordon field. What's ...
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217 views

Dilatations in non-relativistic QM and operator tranformation

I was looking at a QM textbook exercise dealing with dilatations, the transformations are $x \rightarrow x' = \lambda x$ transforming $|\psi\rangle$ into $|\psi'\rangle = ...
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2answers
1k views

The Heisenberg uncertainty principle: Interpreting $\Delta p$, $\Delta t$, etc

(1) I have a textbook question that states the following: An electron has a speed of 500 m/s with an accuracy of 0.004%. Calculate the certainty with which we can locate the position of the ...
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5answers
762 views

Distinguishing identical particles

I've been going through Shankar's Principles of Quantum Mechanics. In the section of the system of identical particles, he uses an example of billiards to illustrate the difference between identical ...
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2answers
821 views

Non-commuting operators can't share any eigenvector

In an introductory Quantum Mechanics textbook, I found the following statement: For two Hamiltonians $H$ and $H'$, non commuting with each other, but commuting with the same group of translations ...
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2answers
236 views

Proof of $Dq-qD=1$ where $D=\frac{\partial }{\partial q}$ is the differential operator

Can anyone provie me the proof of $Dq-qD=1$ where $D=\frac{\partial }{\partial q}$ refers to the differential operator? Or if it's something special to quantum mechanics, why is it? Is this ...
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3answers
328 views

How do I integrate $\frac{1}{\Psi}\frac{\partial \Psi}{\partial x} = Cx$

How do I integrate the following? $$\frac{1}{\Psi}\frac{\partial \Psi}{\partial x} = Cx$$ where $C$ is a constant. I'm supposed to get a Gaussian function out of the above by integrating but don't ...
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2answers
213 views

Will a one year undergraduate course of Linear Algebra be enough for QM? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Linear Algebra for Quantum Physics Can you get all/most of the knowledge you need of Linear Algebra for QM in a one year course? I know for certain my course also ...
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0answers
112 views

Correlation function in relaxation in NMR

I am new in this community, I am from a chemistry background. I want to know a detailed solution of a density matrix for a singlet state using the concept of spin lattice relaxation in NMR. I will ...
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2answers
354 views

proof for $\langle q| p \rangle = e^{ipq}$

What would be the proof for $\langle q| p \rangle = e^{ipq}$? Is it derived from canonical commutation relation? ($|q \rangle $ represents the position eigenstate, while $|p \rangle$ represents the ...
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1answer
6k views

What is an energy eigenstate exactly?

Say you have energy eigenstates \begin{align} \begin{split} |+\rangle= \frac{1}{\sqrt{2}}|1{\rangle}+\frac{1}{\sqrt{2}}|2 \rangle \end{split} \end{align} \begin{align} \begin{split} |-\rangle= ...
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1answer
471 views

Why minibands are formed in superlattices?

In a single, finite quantum well, there are energy levels defined by the eigenstates - the solutions of the Schroedinger's Equation. The corresponding wavefunctions leak to the barrier because of its ...
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3answers
512 views

Why is $\int (dp/2\pi) |p \rangle\langle p| = 1 $?

In quantum mechanics, why is $\int (dp/2\pi) |p \rangle\langle p| = 1 $ where $|p \rangle$ represents momentum eigenstate?
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4answers
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What does it mean (how is it visualized) for a particle to act as a wave?

I have no background in physics. This isn't for homework, just for interest. In quantum physics, it's described that a particle can act as both a particle and a wave. Quoted from HowStuffWorks ...
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1answer
203 views

Proof of quantum mechanical position uncertainty

How can you prove the uncertainty for position is: $$\Delta{x} =\sqrt{\langle x^2\rangle-\langle x\rangle^2}$$ $\Delta{x}$, taken to be the root mean square of x. $$\Delta{x} =\sqrt{\langle ...
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2answers
1k views

How robust is Kramers degeneracy in real material?

Kramers theorem rely on odd total number of electrons. In reality, total number of electrons is about 10^23. Can those electrons be so smart to count the total number precisely and decide to form ...
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0answers
53 views

Free Energy and quantum measurement

Free Energy must be expended to reset the state of an measurement apparatus. Is this statement valid in all situations? Is there a Definitive mathematical exposition?
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2answers
1k views

Solving the Schrödinger equation for the double-slit experiment

I'm not sure if this is the right place to ask a question about the Schrödinger equation, but I'll take my chances anyway. Basically, I would like to know how one can set up a potential function that ...
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2answers
1k views

Confusion about Free Energy and the Hamiltonian

I'm probably making a relatively basic mistake here, but I'm a bit confused about the relation between the Hamiltonian and Helmholtz free energy. From what I can see, the free energy can be written ...
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1answer
123 views

What are relativistic and radiative effects (in quantum simulation)?

I'm reading about Quantum Monte Carlo, and I see that some people are trying to calculate hydrogen and helium energies as accurately as possible. QMC with Green's function or Diffusion QMC seem to be ...
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2answers
319 views

Physical meaning of some operators formed by $|Q\rangle \langle Q|$

In Dirac's formulation of quantum mechanics, Suppose that $q$ represents position observable. About $|q\rangle \langle q|$: what does this operator mean? I do get that it results in an operator, but ...
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Barrier in an infinite double well

I am stuck on a QM homework problem. The setup is this: (To be clear, the potential in the left and rightmost regions is $0$ while the potential in the center region is $V_0$, and the wavefunction ...
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1answer
682 views

State normalization in Dirac's formulation of quantum mechanics

Let us divide the time $T$ into $N$ segments each lasting $δt = T/N$. Then we write $\langle q_F | e^{−iHT} |q_I \rangle = \langle q_F | e^{−iHδt} e^{−iHδt} . . . e^{−iHδt} |q_I \rangle $ Our ...
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1answer
1k views

Schrödinger equation with complex potential

In 1 dimension what is the solution of the Schrödinger equation with potential $$ V(x) = V_r + i V_i $$ Potentials are constant.
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1answer
165 views

Why is amplitude of a wavefunction to propagate from $q$ to $q'$ governed by $e^{-\frac{i}{\hbar}HT}$ unitary operator?

In the textbook Quantum Field Theory by A. Zee, it says: In quantum mechanics, the amplitude to propagate from a point $q_i$ to a point $q_f$ in time $T$ is governed by the unitary operator ...
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2answers
5k views

What math is needed to understand the Schrödinger equation?

If I now see the Schrödinger equation, I just see a bunch of weird symbols, but I want to know what it actually means. So I'm taking a course of Linear Algebra and I'm planning on starting with PDE's ...
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4answers
1k views

Entangled electron-positron pair

Usually when we talk about entanglement, we mean entangled spin states (of electrons) or polarizations (of photons). My questions are: Does pair production guarantee the product electron and ...
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1answer
233 views

Are Born-Oppenheimer energies analytic functions of nuclear positions?

I am looking for references to bibliography that explores the smoothness and analyticity of eigenvalues and eigenfunctions (and matrix elements in general) of a hamiltonian that depends on some ...
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2answers
264 views

Measurement of the energy of an atom using a cold substance

An atom was prepared in a superposition of ground state and excited states.I propose to measure the state by coupling the system to a cold enough substance. By cold enough I mean $$kT\ll E_1,$$ where ...
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1answer
291 views

How quantum field transforms in case of some particular spin

Except when a particle is spin-0, field of all particles transforms when frame of reference is changed, and this defines what spin is. The question is, specifically how does the quantum field ...
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2answers
571 views

How to write Schrodinger equation!

Quantum mechanics: Suppose that there is a particle with orbital angular momentum |L|. But if the particle also has spin quantity |S| the question is: How do I reflect this into Schrodinger equation? ...
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1answer
412 views

An equation that describes massless spin-1 particle

Proca action/equation describes massive spin-1 particle, but I was unable to find an equation that describes massless spin-1 particle. Can anyone tell me what the name of this equation is?
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4answers
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What is the meaning of uncertainty in Heisenberg's uncertainty principle?

The Heisenberg's uncertainty principle states the following: $$\Delta p \cdot \Delta x \ge \frac{h}{4\pi}.$$ While studying for my high school physics exams, I fooled myself into believing that I ...
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3answers
5k views

Why do we use Hermitian operators in QM?

Position, momentum, energy and other observables yield real-valued measurements. The Hilbert-space formalism accounts for this physical fact by associating observables with Hermitian ('self-adjoint') ...
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4answers
919 views

Does measuring destroy entanglement

Before measuring a quantum particle(photon) it exists in a superposition state, once we observe(measure) it, it settles in one of the possible states(destroying superposition). For entangled ...
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0answers
68 views

fiber optic second order PMD as an operator on the tensor product Hilbert space

Second order polarization mode dispersion (SOPMD) is a coupling mechanism between polarization and frequency. Take our photon to be the following tensor product: $\psi = \int \gamma_{\omega} | ...
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4answers
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Why would Klein-Gordon describe spin-0 scalar field while Dirac describe spin-1/2?

The derivation of both Klein-Gordon equation and Dirac equation is due the need of quantum mechanics (or to say more correctly, quantum field theory) to adhere to special relativity. However, excpet ...
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1answer
209 views

Something I don't understand in Quantum Mechanics

I've just started on QM and I'm puzzled with a lot of new ideas in it. 1.On a recent lecture I've attended, there is an equation says: $\langle q'|\sum q|q\rangle \langle q|q' \rangle =\sum q ...
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1answer
103 views

Other ways of checking whether particular system result in non-locality

In quantum mechanics, when hamiltonian $H$ is constrained ($H = \sqrt{m^2 - \hbar^2 \nabla^2} $) so that it would produce simple "relativistic" model of quantum mechanics, we can show that it results ...
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112 views

decoherence free subspace of a single photon

Take the state vector for a single photon as $\psi = \int \gamma_{\omega} | \omega \rangle \otimes (\alpha |H \rangle + \beta | V \rangle )d \omega$ $H, V, \omega$ are the horizontal polarization, ...
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5answers
1k views

Derivation of Schrodinger equation for a system with position dependent effective mass

How to derive the Schrodinger equation for a system with position dependent effective mass? For example, I encountered this equation when I first studied semiconductor hetero-structures. All the books ...
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1answer
4k views

Normalizable wave functions?

How can I test whether a wave function is normalizable? If you apply an operator to a wave function, sometimes the result will not be normalizable. But how can I find these wave functions that do not ...
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1answer
416 views

Matrix and exponential term problem

We know the Schrodinger equation for free Hamiltonian is : $$ i\hbar\frac{\partial\psi}{\partial t} = H_f \psi $$ the wave function could be written as $$ \psi(x,t)=\hat{S}(t) \psi(x,0) $$ $$ ...
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1answer
313 views

On the double slit experiment with 4 slits

I'm not a physicist nor a science savvy person, but I was wondering if this experiment was ever performed in a simultaneous fashion on screens with fixed references(marks) and firing different ...
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2answers
201 views

Diffusion of probability amplitudes

Let's say I have a probability amplitude $\psi:\Sigma\rightarrow\mathbb{C}$ for some domain $\Sigma$ (so, $\psi$ satisfies $\int_\Sigma |\psi|^2=1$). Is there a way to use $\psi$ as initial ...
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4answers
4k views

Intuitive explanation of why momentum is the Fourier transform variable of position?

Does anyone have a (semi-)intuitive explanation of why momentum is the Fourier transform variable of position? (By semi-intuitive I mean, I already have intuition on Fourier transform between ...
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2answers
240 views

$\nabla$ and non-locality in simple relativistic model of quantum mechanics

In Wavefunction in quantum mechanics and locality, wavefunction is constrained by $H = \sqrt{m^2 - \hbar^2 \nabla^2} $, and taylor-expanding $H$ results in: $$ H = \dots = m\sqrt{1 - \hbar^2/m^2 ...