Quantum mechanics describes the microscopic properties of nature in a regime where classical mechanics no longer applies. It explains phenomena such as the wave-particle duality, quantization of energy and the uncertainty principle and is generally used in single body systems. Use the quantum-field-...

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8
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1answer
11k views

Why does the refractive index depend on wavelength? [duplicate]

Why do different wavelength get impeded more or less when in different materials? Moving with the same speed, but a longer physical distance would imply that the fields oscillate less times in the ...
-2
votes
3answers
258 views

How “things” radiate electromagnetic radiation? [closed]

How things radiate electromagnetic radiation? I don't ask why they radiate (higher temperature than 0K) but how they radiate this electromagnetic waves?
1
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1answer
2k views

Bound states and scattering length

What is the relationship between bound states and scattering length? What is the relationship between scattering states and scattering length? When we say, potential is 'like' repulsive for positive ...
0
votes
1answer
210 views

Rotational Hamiltonian for collective model

The effect of rotation can be considered by modelling the nucleus as a rotating body, characterised by some moment of inertia. Then how The Hamiltonian describing rotation is? $$H_{rot}=\frac{\...
0
votes
1answer
612 views

Formula for Rabi frequency

The Rabi frequency is an expression of the light-matter interaction (Hamiltonian) and gives a relation between field polarization and electric dipole. Reading the book of Cohen-Tannoudji (Complement $...
6
votes
1answer
421 views

What do we mean when we say the QM wave function is a section of the $U(1)$ bundle?

I have a couple questions here. To keep the discussion simple lets stick to the following case: what is the quantum mechanics of a single particle in the presence of a background EM field, such as ...
7
votes
2answers
1k views

The problem of a relativistic path integral

Many books have described the path integral for non-relativistic quantum. For example, how to get the Schrödinger equation from the path integral. But no one told us the relativistic version. In fact, ...
-4
votes
1answer
508 views

Entanglement, really? [duplicate]

If I have two "entangled" particles and I know the spin state of every one of them. Then, I change the spin state of one of the particles, will it affect the spin state of the other particle even if ...
0
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0answers
143 views

Symmetry for even even nuclei

For even even axially symmetric nuclei K=0 because even even spherical nuclei don't show rotaional spectra and therefore do not rotate about the axis of symmetry; Thus the angular momentum about a ...
2
votes
0answers
198 views

Hamiltonian Nuclear collective model

Let $\mathscr{I}_3$ and $\mathscr{I}$ are the moments of inertia for rotations about symmetry axis 3 and about an axis perpendicular to it , and I is the angular momentum operator with components $I_1,...
1
vote
2answers
565 views

What is the meaning of spin two?

As the title suggests, what is the meaning of spin two? I kind of understand spin half for electrons. I can kind of understand spin one for other particles. However I'm not sure how something could ...
3
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0answers
289 views

How to set up Schrodinger's equation for an electron (as a charge distribution) under its own electrostatic field

After reading about the hydrogen atom and understanding how Schrodinger's equation explains most part of the atomic spectrum of an hydrogen atom, and also came to know that, it explains most of the ...
2
votes
1answer
446 views

Non-equilibrium Green functions

How do we use non-equilibrium Green's functions (NEGF) or the Keldysh formalism in the theory of quantum transport? Please take a simple example like the Hopping model with a non-equilibrium ...
9
votes
2answers
1k views

Adiabatic theorem and Berry phase

As far as I can check, the adiabatic theorem in quantum mechanics can be proven exactly when there is no crossing between (pseudo-)time-evolved energy levels. To be a little bit more explicit, one ...
1
vote
0answers
358 views

Kubo formalism application

Suppose I have some pertubative Hamiltonian on the Hubbard Hamiltonian and I want to calculate the change in current in linear response using the Kubo formalism. Now the kind of perturbative ...
2
votes
2answers
329 views

Biggest experimental validations of postulates of Quantum Mechanics

What are some experimental results that validate postulates of Quantum mechanics completely beyond any doubt ? Since there are alternate theories being used by various physicists to describe the same ...
3
votes
2answers
960 views

current operator in Hubbard model

How to derive the particle current operators for the non-interacting and interacting Hubbard model ? Hubbard Hamiltonian is given here with the interaction term: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...
3
votes
2answers
603 views

Tensor Product of Hilbert spaces

This question is regarding a definition of Tensor product of Hilbert spaces that I found in Wald's book on QFT in curved space time. Let's first get some notation straight. Let $(V,+,*)$ denote a set ...
4
votes
3answers
2k views

Direct Sum of Hilbert spaces

I am a physicist who is not that well-versed in mathematical rigour (a shame, I know! But I'm working on it.) In Wald's book on QFT in Curved spacetimes, I found the following definitions of the ...
0
votes
2answers
384 views

What is the required prerequisite knowledge of QM, for starting QFT?

As a physics bsc student, I have a very limited knowledge of QM: Dirac formalism, Schrodinger equation and simple solutions (oscillators, particle in a given potential, hydrogen-like atom etc). There ...
3
votes
3answers
354 views

spectral function in condensed matter physics

What is the importance of deriving the results of perturbation theory in condensed matter physics in terms of spectral functions ?
1
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2answers
1k views

Particle current operator in general vs Particle current operator for tight binding Hamiltonian

I am referring Mahan Many-Particle Physics. There are 2 particle current operators -one in general and one for the tight binding Hamiltonian. How do we go from the general current operator (1.195 in ...
2
votes
0answers
214 views

Definition of a 'tunneling lifetime'

I'm given a one-dimensional potential with two wells, one local minimum at some higher energy and one deep global minimum next to it, separated by a barrier of own shape and height (phase qubit). I ...
29
votes
6answers
3k views

Canonical everyday-life example of a technology that could not work without humans mastering QM in analogy to the application of GR in GPS?

The GPS is a very handy example in explaining to a broad audience why it is useful for humanity to know the laws of general relativity. It nicely bridges the abstract theory with daily life ...
1
vote
0answers
60 views

commutators in an uncertainty relationship derived from a partition function?

The maximum information principle for the discrete case gives rise to a partition function (>>> see details here) $$Z(\lambda_1,\ldots, \lambda_m) = \sum_{i=1}^n \exp\left[\lambda_1 f_1(x_i) + \cdots ...
2
votes
0answers
83 views

commutator to entropy in an uncertainty relationship?

Question: Does there exist a commutator to entropy in an uncertainty relationship? Similar Energy and time for instance.
4
votes
1answer
291 views

Absorption & emission spectra

The process of obtaining an absorption spectra involves passing a complete spectrum of light from the material under consideration. The material absorbs the specific wavelength and allows the rest to ...
1
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0answers
113 views

Types of Solitons

In the condensed matter literature, I have seen broadly two types of solitons which are dark and bright corresponding to fall and rise in density. (I know only the number density case ). But among the ...
1
vote
2answers
532 views

Full time-derivative of a function and Schrodinger equation

From Hamiltonian formalism there is well known equation, $$ \frac{d F}{dt} = \frac{\partial F}{\partial t} + \{F, H\}_{PB}, $$ where $ \{H, F\}_{PB}$ is the Poisson bracket. After using Hamiltonian ...
2
votes
1answer
329 views

Does the spin precession change sign when the angular momentum does?

Say you have a charged particle moving circularly in an electromagnetic field. Basic quantum mechanics tell us that its spin will precess with a certain frequency. If the same particle were traveling ...
7
votes
1answer
6k views

Differences between pure/mixed/entangled/separable/superposed states

I am currently trying to establish a clear picture of pure/mixed/entangled/separable/superposed states. In the following I will always assume a basis of $|1\rangle$ and $|0\rangle$ for my quantum ...
4
votes
2answers
264 views

Why there is no Gibb's phenomenon in QM?

Why we don't see any Gibb's phenomenon in quantum mechanics? EDIT At sharp edges (discontinuities), we usually find ringing. This can be observed in many physical phenomenon (eg. shock waves). ...
1
vote
1answer
137 views

Quantization for particle in a box problem

Consider the particle in a box problem in QM. The crux of the reason why QM is able to explain the physical phenomenon is not just the theory but also able to impose boundary conditions which ...
4
votes
2answers
280 views

On Bell inequality and bound entangled states

I have recently seen some presentation slides of Michał Horodecki (slide number 77) in which he discussed the following conjecture. Bound entangled states satisfy all Bell inequalities The ...
0
votes
1answer
304 views

Electrons in a box [closed]

According to the Pauli principle, there can be no more than two electrons in a given state. If there are a number N of electrons in this box in the lowest states possible, show that the energy of the "...
9
votes
3answers
2k views

Eigenstate of position+momentum?

I'm studying Quantum Mechanics on my own, so I'm bound to have alot of wrong ideas - please be forgiving! Recently, I was thinking about the quantum mechanical assertion (postulate?) that states with ...
0
votes
0answers
158 views

relative phase/sign in $\Psi$ after exchange of composite particles with angular momenta

I'm reading Quantum Liquids by A.J. Leggett and became confused by the following statement in the first chapter. Consider now a pair of such identical atoms. In the absence of appreciable coupling ...
4
votes
2answers
781 views

What is the most general expression for the coordinate representation of momentum operator?

I have a question about deriving the coordinate representation of momentum operator from the commutation relation, $[x,p]= i$. One derivation (ref W. Greiner's Quantum Mechanics: An Introduction, 4th ...
1
vote
3answers
3k views

Why electrons can't radiate in their atoms' orbits?

It's an old-new question (I found only one similar question with unsatisfactory (for me) answer: Where did Schrödinger solve the radiating problem of Bohr's model?) It's strange for me how all books ...
5
votes
1answer
321 views

Operator norm of creation and annihilation operators

Are the creation and the annihilation operators $a(f)$ and $a^{\dagger}(f)$ for the bosonic Fock space bounded? What is their norm? So far I did not have found any note about this in the linked ...
3
votes
1answer
2k views

Time Reversal Operator

I know that time reversal operator is an antiunitary operator. How does it work on wavefunctions? I believe in this way: $$T \psi (k,+)=e^{i\pi S_y/\hbar} K \psi (k,+) = \psi^*(-k,-),$$ but I am not ...
4
votes
1answer
1k views

quantum mechanics current operators

How to derive the charge current and the energy current operators in second quantized form in Quantum mechanics ? Also if you could comment in a similar way on the entropy current operator, that will ...
0
votes
1answer
275 views

how do they rip one single atom from something?

this is simple. what i actually want to ask is, when they do the subatomic particle collision experiments, how do they produce one single subatomic particle, e.g proton, neutron? how do they rip one ...
2
votes
2answers
974 views

Do electrons have a radius when they behave like a particle?

I know sometimes electrons behave like waves, but it sometimes can be seen as a particle. while it's a particle, does it have a radius? or, a volume? If it doesn't even have a volume, how can we still ...
0
votes
1answer
338 views

How to determine the region that would contain a quantum particle

(a) A hydrogen atom is in its ground state. If space is divided into identical infinitesimal cubes, in which cube is the electron most likely to be found? If instead space is divided into 31 ...
0
votes
1answer
167 views

At what point does everything become nothing?

I understand that the universe, which I'll call "everything", is expanding and it used to be much smaller. But I keep hearing assertions about a universe coming from nothing. If you rolled the clock ...
6
votes
1answer
5k views

Why do some materials reflect (metals) and other materials reflect and refract (glass) from the quantum perspective?

Recently I was asked to explain the difference between reflection and total internal reflection from a purely conceptual standpoint (no math). Let me explain what I already know. Reflection and ...
12
votes
1answer
3k views

Variational Derivation of Schrodinger Equation

In reading Weinstock's Calculus of Variations, on pages 261 - 262 he explains how Schrodinger apparently first derived the Schrodinger equation from variational principles. Unfortunately I don't ...
8
votes
5answers
1k views

Why doesn't a quantum particle in an attractive 1D potential accumulate at the center?

I have two questions regarding (possibly counter intuitive results) Schrodinger equation and its application to two (strictly hypothetical) scenarios. Consider the 1D potential $V(x) = - \frac{\...
1
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0answers
233 views

Total angular momentum in multielectron atoms

I have some confusion about orbitals in multielectron atoms. Let's say we consider an atom (Lithium, for example, $1s^2\, 2p^1$) and that the state of the last electron is [n=2, l=1, ml=0, s=1/2, ms=...