Quantum mechanics describes the microscopic properties of nature in a regime where classical mechanics no longer applies. It explains phenomena such as the wave-particle duality, quantization of energy and the uncertainty principle and is generally used in single body systems. Use the ...

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790 views

Why electron clouds in atoms don't radiate? [duplicate]

I was reading that Bohr assumed electrons in orbit simply did not radiate, and my professor told me that the actual case is that electrons are clouds of probability. Even so, aren't they still moving ...
6
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2answers
160 views

Can an observer be the observed?

As a supplement to this question as to whether particles can be observers, supposing that the answer is yes. One could suppose a setup where particle A is observing particle B, but what to stop us ...
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0answers
241 views

Where does mass come from? [duplicate]

I've read material claiming it comes from the Higgs boson fails while others claim it is from the tensions of quarks in the gluon field... I am only a 15 year old kid in high school so please "dumb it ...
2
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3answers
369 views

States and observables in quantum mechanics

I'm beginning learn quantum mechanics. As I understand, state is a map $\phi$ from $L^2(\mathbb R)$ such that $|\phi|^2$ describes probability density of a particle's position. By integrating ...
11
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1answer
294 views

Can observers be particles?

Generally Quantum mechanics divides a system what is to be observed and an observer. This is generally taken to be some human being. But why restrict it to such? Why not a particle? Is there a good ...
2
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1answer
75 views

Radiation interactions: how is the transition from the “electric” regimen to “particle-like” regimen?

When we study the interaction of the electromagnetic radiation with free electrons we can find two different approaches in the literature: for low frequency (RF, light...) a classical view is used and ...
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3answers
987 views

Connection between $\Delta x \Delta p \geq \frac{\hbar}{2}$ and $\Delta E \Delta t \geq \frac{\hbar}{2}$

Is there a way to derive second equation from the first one? I mean is there a connection between those two uncertainty relations? \begin{align} \Delta x \Delta p &\geq \frac{\hbar}{2}\\ \Delta ...
2
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2answers
435 views

Difference between charge density wave and charge distribution

We can always see modulated charge density, the Friedel Oscillation, around an probe charge due to other electrons' response. Can this be called charge density wave (I believe not)? If not, what is ...
3
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3answers
426 views

Computation theory and the simulation argument

Can physical states be treated as information (strings over some alphabet)? If (1) is true, isn't this a trivial conclusion that the universe can be simulated by a Turing machine or a cellular ...
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4answers
2k views

Bra–ket notation & Schrödinger's cat intepretation

Can anyone explain to me the meaning of this picture? I Know that the argument is Quantum Physics and that cat is the Schrödinger's cat, but I don't know how to interpret the bra–ket notation and also ...
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1answer
524 views

Can atoms have nonzero dipole moments?

Let's make the question easier by considering two-level atoms(with spin states, i.e. spin up $|\uparrow\rangle$ and spin down $|\downarrow\rangle$). An article I recently read claims that atoms do not ...
7
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2answers
1k views

Slowing down light in an opaque crystal for a whole minute

I just read about a team of physicists at the University of Darmstadt, Germany, that managed to completely slow down a beam of light that traveled through an opaque crystal (article here). How is it ...
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0answers
110 views

Adiabatic theorem in the regime of quantum optics

I am wondering whether there is a version of adiabatic theorem in the regime of quantum optics. My understanding of quantum optics involves with the interaction between photon and atom. This ...
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2answers
742 views

Difference between a quantum process and a thermal process?

I was reading an article online pertaining to quantum mechanics and I stumbled across these few sentences. A look at the corresponding energy regimes shows (Beck and Eccles 1992) that quantum ...
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2answers
140 views

Is the beta barium borate crystal an observer in the delayed choice quantum eraser double split experiment?

I'm a little confused about the top answer to this question: Variation of delayed choice quantum eraser He says "if you simply detect all signal photons and make no distinction between them, there ...
3
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2answers
278 views

Quantum Mechanics Basics: product space

Consider a coupled harmonic oscillator with their position given by $x_1$ and $x_2$. Say the normal coordinates $x_{\pm}={1\over\sqrt{2}} (x_1\pm x_2)$, in which the harmonic oscillators decouple, ...
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2answers
187 views

classical understanding of an atom [duplicate]

A problem in Bohr's day was understanding why an orbiting electron does not continuously radiate an EM field. An orbiting electron is a moving charge and according to Maxwell, this should generate an ...
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2answers
575 views

First principle calculation of boiling point of water

How can we theoretically calculate the boiling point of water at given pressure (other subtle parameters as well, if any)? What is the most accurate (minimum discrepancy with experimental value) ...
3
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1answer
323 views

Energy of an EM wave compared to energy of a photon

Several posts on this forum ask the question about the role of amplitude in calculating the energy of an Em wave. This struck me as odd since I learned that E=hv. There is no amplitude in the Planck ...
3
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1answer
293 views

Intuition behind Hamiltonian

I am reading this paper by Das et al. which converts Deutsch's algorithm into an adiabatic quantum algorithm. I don't get the intuition behind the initial and final Hamiltonians. If defines the ...
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2answers
558 views

Quantum XOR: How do you generalize it?

Consider the classical XOR Gate: Given a 2 bit system: $G = [u_1, u_2]$ $$XOR(G) = (u_1 + u_2) \ mod \ 2$$ Is the following a good generalizaiton of a Quantum XOR Gate: Given a 2-qubit system: ...
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0answers
189 views

Why is particle number conserved, and what are the bounds on non-conservation?

Think of a modified Mott experiment: You place a single particle in the center of an empty perfect detector. The particle is described by a wave function, which will spread outwards and interact at ...
3
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1answer
861 views

Can a force stop a Photon since Photons have momentum and What does momentum mean when talking about massless particles?

Momentum measures how hard it is to stop an object. While Photons are massless they still have relativistic mass and energy. My question is can something stop photons other than being absorbed by ...
4
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1answer
2k views

Is the electromagnetic force responsible for contact forces? [duplicate]

It is commonly stated that there are four fundamental forces, or interactions, in nature. It is natural to consider which of those is responsible for the normal force we meet in elementary physics. ...
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4answers
221 views

Where does the change in energy come from when trapping a photon between mirrors?

You have a photon traveling with E=hf and you trap it between two perfectly reflecting mirrors (like a QM particle in a box). The photon has to make a standing wave between the mirrors and its spacial ...
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2answers
721 views

Basic question on bra-ket notation

Which of the following corresponds to a $ \psi(x)$, a wavefunction written in the position basis: $ x| \psi\rangle $ or $ \langle x| \psi\rangle $? If it is the second expression (which my textbook ...
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57 views

What physical value is described by following operator?

Let's have the system of point-like non-interacting particles and it's own angular momentum $$ \mathbf L_{1} = \mathbf L - [\mathbf R_{E} \times \mathbf P], $$ where $\mathbf R_{E}$ - center of energy ...
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3answers
2k views

It appears that stationary states aren't so stationary

$$ \DeclareMathOperator{\dif}{d \!} \newcommand{\ramuno}{\mathrm{i}} \newcommand{\exponent}{\mathrm{e}} \newcommand{\ket}[1]{|{#1}\rangle} \newcommand{\bra}[1]{\langle{#1}|} ...
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0answers
166 views

From Berry's phase to artificial Gauge potential

How a nonzero geometric phase in a loop is used to generate artificial gauge potentials? If possible, can you also tell how to generate the non-abelian artificial gauge potentials.
4
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1answer
711 views

Reference frame involved in the Schrödinger's equation

I have a doubt as to in which frame of reference the Schrödinger equation is written? I think it is inertial but can't reason it out.
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0answers
74 views

Potentials in Feynman path integral II

I am still working on the Feynman path integral, more specifically on the case of a free particle with an infinite potential wall, i.e. the quantum system defined by the Hamiltonian $$H_1 = ...
13
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1answer
259 views

Do Franck-Condon oscillations have natural lineshapes?

I recently found a paper (for the curious, this one) that talks about observing the motion of a nuclear wavepacket in H2O, as initiated by tunnel ionization. This wavepacket should be thought of as a ...
2
votes
1answer
885 views

What are the Conflicting Predictions of General Relativity & Quantum Mechanics? [duplicate]

I see a lot of questions in various sites about why the 2 theories are or aren't incompatible, I'm satisfied as to why that's the case. However it has been mentioned that both theories make ...
2
votes
1answer
195 views

Topological quantum computation: abelian vs. non-abelian anyons

We need non-abelian fractional hall states because of the ground state degeneracy http://rmp.aps.org/abstract/RMP/v80/i3/p1083_1 (arXiv version for free). But we can also have degeneracy even in case ...
9
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2answers
721 views

Why were the fathers of quantum mechanics so sure radioactive decay was indeterministic?

The classic example of an indeterministic system is a radioactive isotope, e.g. the one that kills Schrödinger's cat. I get there are arguments against hidden variables in quantum mechanics, but how ...
10
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2answers
3k views

What causes a black-body radiation curve to be continuous?

The ideal black-body radiation curve (unlike the quantized emission seen from atomic spectra), is continuous over all frequencies. Many objects approximate ideal blackbodies and have radiation curves ...
5
votes
1answer
99 views

Meaning of the 'deep lattice limit' and 'shallow lattice limit'?

In condensed matter literature, at many places, the phrase 'deep lattice limit' is used. Please tell what is the deep lattice limit and the shallow lattice limit?
2
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0answers
141 views

Quantum annealing computing

What is Quantum Annealing and quantum annealing computing and what are its advantages and disadvantages with respect to quantum circuit quantum computing/computers?
2
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1answer
249 views

Axiomatic structure behind Dirac's formulation of QM?

According to the paper Quantum Mechanics Beyond Hilbert Space by J.P. Antoine, several mathematical structures have been devised to make mathematical sense of Dirac's formulation of quantum mechanics ...
4
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4answers
2k views

Scientist propose solution to quantum measurement problem, explain further

Link to Article The scientists In their recent opus magnum, Theo Nieuwenhuizen (Institute of Physics, UvA) and colleagues claim to have found a solution to the so-called quantum measurement ...
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0answers
342 views

What is the energy scale of a Hamiltonian?

On the second page of this paper a term 'fundamental energy scale' is used while talking about a Hamiltonian. The context is implementing Deutsch's algorithm using Adiabatic Quantum Computation. What ...
4
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1answer
333 views

Saturation of the Cauchy-Schwarz Inequality

Going to as little details as possible, here is a statement from Wald's text on QFT in curved spacetimes(I am not quoting the book) He considers two vector spaces ${\cal S}$ and ${\cal H}$. Note ...
1
vote
1answer
159 views

How does adding electrons break the angular momentum degeneracy?

In the hydrogen atom, the energy does not depend on l. This degeneracy is sometimes called "accidental" (because it does not correspond to some symmetry?). However, there is l dependence in the energy ...
0
votes
1answer
123 views

I heard that at quantum level the past-present-future is not in order, is this true? Is time really messed up there?

I heard that at Quantum level events can happen out of order making causality invalid. Thus the future can happen in present and the present in the future. Is this true?
0
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1answer
122 views

Nillson Potential [closed]

We define a Hamiltonian to derive Nilsson potential, $$\hat{H}=-\frac{\mathbf{\hat{p}}^2}{2m}+ \frac{1}{2}m\left[\omega_\bot^2(\hat{x}^2+\hat{y}^2)+\omega_z^2\hat{z}^2\right]$$ Nilsson model is a ...
0
votes
1answer
300 views

Coordinate system

Quoting from 'Nuclear Physics - Theory and Experiment' by RR Roy, BP Nigam 2005 edition Link to text How did the author arrive at equations (23a, 23b,23c)? Chapter 8 Nuclear model II, 8.7 ...
8
votes
1answer
11k views

Why does the refractive index depend on wavelength? [duplicate]

Why do different wavelength get impeded more or less when in different materials? Moving with the same speed, but a longer physical distance would imply that the fields oscillate less times in the ...
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3answers
256 views

How “things” radiate electromagnetic radiation? [closed]

How things radiate electromagnetic radiation? I don't ask why they radiate (higher temperature than 0K) but how they radiate this electromagnetic waves?
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1answer
2k views

Bound states and scattering length

What is the relationship between bound states and scattering length? What is the relationship between scattering states and scattering length? When we say, potential is 'like' repulsive for ...
0
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1answer
207 views

Rotational Hamiltonian for collective model

The effect of rotation can be considered by modelling the nucleus as a rotating body, characterised by some moment of inertia. Then how The Hamiltonian describing rotation is? ...